6-30-12

Matthew 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.” The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

 A Way to Pray

Most of the time, St. Ignatius is associated with a form of prayer with scripture that involves the imagination. This, indeed, accounts for the bulk of the Spiritual Exercises. But he also proposes several other methods of prayer that can be very helpful for someone on retreat or in daily life.

One such method is that of a slow, word by word recitation of key, basic prayers of the Catholic faith. The idea is not to get through as many prayers as possible, but simply to soak up the meaning that is latent in such rich prayers. For instance, take the Our Father. St. Ignatius instructs us to consider each word, taking as long as we need to in order to relish whatever we are able to find there. It could be that a whole hour passes just considering the word “Father” without having any time to move on to another phrase. Or it could be that we only find one particularly rich word. The prayer period is concluded with the usual Ignatian petition for whatever grace we especially need.

One particular benefit of this way of praying, and why it has been useful for so many Catholics, is that it familiarizes us deeply with the prayers that we say so often. While sometimes it is good to pray a full rosary of Hail Mary’s, at other times, it may be good to just consider the words, “Hail Mary.” This way of praying can also be used with any scriptural text, and any excerpt from the liturgy, for instance, the Lamb of God or the Gloria. It’s nothing fancy, just letting God speak a word of grace and life into our hearts through these treasured prayers.

—Mr. Timothy Kieras, S.J.

 Prayer

As you pray, ponder each word and let God’s Spirit take the lead:

Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

As you pray, ponder each word and let God’s Spirit take the lead:

Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come, Thy will  be done on earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

A Way to Pray

Most of the time, St. Ignatius is associated with a form of prayer with scripture that involves the imagination. This, indeed, accounts for the bulk of the Spiritual Exercises. But he also proposes several other methods of prayer that can be very helpful for someone on retreat or in daily life.

One such method is that of a slow, word by word recitation of key, basic prayers of the Catholic faith. The idea is not to get through as many prayers as possible, but simply to soak up the meaning that is latent in such rich prayers. For instance, take the Our Father. St. Ignatius instructs us to consider each word, taking as long as we need to in order to relish whatever we are able to find there. It could be that a whole hour passes just considering the word “Father” without having any time to move on to another phrase. Or it could be that we only find one particularly rich word. The prayer period is concluded with the usual Ignatian petition for whatever grace we especially need.

One particular benefit of this way of praying, and why it has been useful for so many Catholics, is that it familiarizes us deeply with the prayers that we say so often. While sometimes it is good to pray a full rosary of Hail Mary’s, at other times, it may be good to just consider the words, “Hail Mary.” This way of praying can also be used with any scriptural text, and any excerpt from the liturgy, for instance, the Lamb of God or the Gloria.  It’s nothing fancy, just letting God speak a word of grace and life into our hearts through these treasured prayers.

—Mr. Timothy Kieras, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Matthew 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.” The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

6-29-2012

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles

Matthew 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”

And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

The Humble Lord of the Universe

The human world is remarkable in its long dramatic struggle between praising God and building things to His glory, and denying Him and building a world without God. I was very blessed this past Holy Week to return to Rome, where I had spent five years of my priestly formation. Perhaps it’s because I was born in New York that I so love Rome, the “Eternal City.” This time I especially loved visiting churches. I simply could not get enough of the beauty in the churches of Rome. Not least of them are the basilicas of St. Peter and St. Paul.

But the beauty of the churches is merely the overflow – in gorgeous marble and other precious stones, in splendid forms – of the glory of the God encountered in the person of Jesus Christ. No matter how splendid the altar, the heart of it is always the tabernacle with its humble vigil light, and in that tabernacle, the humble Lord of the Universe.

At the church of St. Peter in Chains, I marveled at the groups of people who were all agog at Michelangelo’s statue of Moses (the one with the horns), while – as it seems everywhere – there were only a handful of humble people who even acknowledge the Real Presence of that God before whom all human art is as nothing.

Refusing what she found an intimidating bath in Lourdes, Catholic writer Flannery O’Connor once wrote: “When in Rome, do as you done in Milledgeville.” Indeed. And in Rome, as everywhere in the world, we adore and rejoice in the glory of the Eucharistic Lord, present in every tabernacle of the world, no matter how splendid or humble. And we rejoice in a special way in His special friends, whose lives and martyrdoms witness to His love throughout all the ages, on whom He built His Church.

—Fr. Raymond Gawronski, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we yearn for simpler days: less going on, less expected, and fewer choices. We need to remind ourselves that we have the power to simplify our lives. Lord, we know that when we are too busy to pray, we are too busy. Strengthen our resolve to put first things first, to say “no” to things that are not important, and to say “yes” to that which brings more peace and joy to our lives.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord,  sometimes we yearn for simpler days: less going on,  less expected, and fewer choices.  We need to remind ourselves that we have the power to simplify our lives.  Lord, we know that when we are too busy to pray, we are too busy.  Strengthen our resolve to put first things first, to say “no” to things that are not important, and to say “yes” to that which brings more peace and joy to our lives.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Humble Lord of the Universe

The human world is remarkable in its long dramatic struggle between praising God and building things to His glory, and denying Him and building a world without God.  I was very blessed this past Holy Week to return to Rome, where I had spent five years of my priestly formation.  Perhaps it’s because I was born in New York that I so love Rome, the “Eternal City.” This time I especially loved visiting churches. I simply could not get enough of the beauty in the churches of Rome. Not least of them are the basilicas of St. Peter and St. Paul.

But the beauty of the churches is merely the overflow – in gorgeous marble and other precious stones, in splendid forms – of the glory of the God encountered in the person of Jesus Christ. No matter how splendid the altar, the heart of it is always the tabernacle with its humble vigil light, and in that tabernacle, the humble Lord of the Universe.

At the church of St. Peter in Chains, I marveled at the groups of people who were all agog at Michelangelo’s statue of Moses (the one with the horns), while – as it seems everywhere – there were only a handful of humble people who even acknowledge the Real Presence of that God before whom all human art is as nothing.

Refusing what she found an intimidating bath in Lourdes, Catholic writer Flannery O’Connor  once wrote: “When in Rome, do as you done in Milledgeville.”  Indeed.  And in Rome, as everywhere in the world, we adore and rejoice in the glory of the Eucharistic Lord, present in every tabernacle of the world, no matter how splendid or humble.  And we rejoice in a special way in His special friends, whose lives and martyrdoms witness to His love throughout all the ages, on whom He built His Church.

—Fr. Raymond Gawronski, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles

Matthew 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”

And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

6-28-2012

Saint Irenaeus, Bishop and Martyr

2 Kings 24: 8-17

The king of Babylon took him prisoner in the eighth year of his reign. He carried off all the treasures of the house of the Lord, and the treasures of the king’s house; he cut in pieces all the vessels of gold in the temple of the Lord, which King Solomon of Israel had made, all this as the Lord had foretold. He carried away all Jerusalem, all the officials, all the warriors, ten thousand captives, all the artisans and the smiths; no one remained, except the poorest people of the land. He carried away Jehoiachin to Babylon; the king’s mother, the king’s wives, his officials, and the elite of the land, he took into captivity from Jerusalem to Babylon.

The king of Babylon brought captive to Babylon all the men of valor, seven thousand, the artisans and the smiths, one thousand, all of them strong and fit for war. The king of Babylon made Mattaniah, Jehoiachin’s uncle, king in his place, and changed his name to Zedekiah.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

Ripples of Hope

Jechoiachin was eighteen years old when he became king of Juda, and he…sinned against the Lord. It was during his reign that the Babylonian army … marched against Jerusalem and…carried away as prisoners the people of Jerusalem —2 Kings 24:8-10,24

Josiah and Jeremiah failed to shake the complacency of Judah and to move the people to reform, as a nation. A warning came in the form of the Babylonian army. But it only brought Judah to her knees, not to her senses. Some people even boasted, saying in effect, “Our city and our Temple are still intact. See, God is protecting us!”

How complacent am I about the moral status of my personal life? Our nation?

Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope…Those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance. — Robert F. Kennedy

—Excerpted from Mission, by Fr. Mark Link, S.J. ©2000 RCL Enterprises, Inc., Allen TX. For more prayer resources from Fr. Link, please visit www.staygreat.com

Prayer

O my God, teach me to be generous: to serve you as you deserve to be served; to give without counting the cost; to fight without fear of being wounded; to work without seeking rest; and to spend myself without expecting any reward, but the knowledge that I am doing your holy will.

—Saint Ignatius


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord Jesus, teach me to be generous;

teach me to serve you as you deserve,

to give and not to count the cost,

to fight and not to heed the wounds,

to toil and not to seek for rest,

to labor and not to seek reward,

except that of knowing that I do your will.

Amen.  (Prayer for Generosity)

—St. Ignatius Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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6-30-12

Matthew 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.” The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

 A Way to Pray

Most of the time, St. Ignatius is associated with a form of prayer with scripture that involves the imagination. This, indeed, accounts for the bulk of the Spiritual Exercises. But he also proposes several other methods of prayer that can be very helpful for someone on retreat or in daily life.

One such method is that of a slow, word by word recitation of key, basic prayers of the Catholic faith. The idea is not to get through as many prayers as possible, but simply to soak up the meaning that is latent in such rich prayers. For instance, take the Our Father. St. Ignatius instructs us to consider each word, taking as long as we need to in order to relish whatever we are able to find there. It could be that a whole hour passes just considering the word “Father” without having any time to move on to another phrase. Or it could be that we only find one particularly rich word. The prayer period is concluded with the usual Ignatian petition for whatever grace we especially need.

One particular benefit of this way of praying, and why it has been useful for so many Catholics, is that it familiarizes us deeply with the prayers that we say so often. While sometimes it is good to pray a full rosary of Hail Mary’s, at other times, it may be good to just consider the words, “Hail Mary.” This way of praying can also be used with any scriptural text, and any excerpt from the liturgy, for instance, the Lamb of God or the Gloria. It’s nothing fancy, just letting God speak a word of grace and life into our hearts through these treasured prayers.

—Mr. Timothy Kieras, S.J.

 Prayer

As you pray, ponder each word and let God’s Spirit take the lead:

Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

As you pray, ponder each word and let God’s Spirit take the lead:

Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come, Thy will  be done on earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

A Way to Pray

Most of the time, St. Ignatius is associated with a form of prayer with scripture that involves the imagination. This, indeed, accounts for the bulk of the Spiritual Exercises. But he also proposes several other methods of prayer that can be very helpful for someone on retreat or in daily life.

One such method is that of a slow, word by word recitation of key, basic prayers of the Catholic faith. The idea is not to get through as many prayers as possible, but simply to soak up the meaning that is latent in such rich prayers. For instance, take the Our Father. St. Ignatius instructs us to consider each word, taking as long as we need to in order to relish whatever we are able to find there. It could be that a whole hour passes just considering the word “Father” without having any time to move on to another phrase. Or it could be that we only find one particularly rich word. The prayer period is concluded with the usual Ignatian petition for whatever grace we especially need.

One particular benefit of this way of praying, and why it has been useful for so many Catholics, is that it familiarizes us deeply with the prayers that we say so often. While sometimes it is good to pray a full rosary of Hail Mary’s, at other times, it may be good to just consider the words, “Hail Mary.” This way of praying can also be used with any scriptural text, and any excerpt from the liturgy, for instance, the Lamb of God or the Gloria.  It’s nothing fancy, just letting God speak a word of grace and life into our hearts through these treasured prayers.

—Mr. Timothy Kieras, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Matthew 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.” The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

6-29-2012

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles

Matthew 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”

And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

The Humble Lord of the Universe

The human world is remarkable in its long dramatic struggle between praising God and building things to His glory, and denying Him and building a world without God. I was very blessed this past Holy Week to return to Rome, where I had spent five years of my priestly formation. Perhaps it’s because I was born in New York that I so love Rome, the “Eternal City.” This time I especially loved visiting churches. I simply could not get enough of the beauty in the churches of Rome. Not least of them are the basilicas of St. Peter and St. Paul.

But the beauty of the churches is merely the overflow – in gorgeous marble and other precious stones, in splendid forms – of the glory of the God encountered in the person of Jesus Christ. No matter how splendid the altar, the heart of it is always the tabernacle with its humble vigil light, and in that tabernacle, the humble Lord of the Universe.

At the church of St. Peter in Chains, I marveled at the groups of people who were all agog at Michelangelo’s statue of Moses (the one with the horns), while – as it seems everywhere – there were only a handful of humble people who even acknowledge the Real Presence of that God before whom all human art is as nothing.

Refusing what she found an intimidating bath in Lourdes, Catholic writer Flannery O’Connor once wrote: “When in Rome, do as you done in Milledgeville.” Indeed. And in Rome, as everywhere in the world, we adore and rejoice in the glory of the Eucharistic Lord, present in every tabernacle of the world, no matter how splendid or humble. And we rejoice in a special way in His special friends, whose lives and martyrdoms witness to His love throughout all the ages, on whom He built His Church.

—Fr. Raymond Gawronski, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we yearn for simpler days: less going on, less expected, and fewer choices. We need to remind ourselves that we have the power to simplify our lives. Lord, we know that when we are too busy to pray, we are too busy. Strengthen our resolve to put first things first, to say “no” to things that are not important, and to say “yes” to that which brings more peace and joy to our lives.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord,  sometimes we yearn for simpler days: less going on,  less expected, and fewer choices.  We need to remind ourselves that we have the power to simplify our lives.  Lord, we know that when we are too busy to pray, we are too busy.  Strengthen our resolve to put first things first, to say “no” to things that are not important, and to say “yes” to that which brings more peace and joy to our lives.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Humble Lord of the Universe

The human world is remarkable in its long dramatic struggle between praising God and building things to His glory, and denying Him and building a world without God.  I was very blessed this past Holy Week to return to Rome, where I had spent five years of my priestly formation.  Perhaps it’s because I was born in New York that I so love Rome, the “Eternal City.” This time I especially loved visiting churches. I simply could not get enough of the beauty in the churches of Rome. Not least of them are the basilicas of St. Peter and St. Paul.

But the beauty of the churches is merely the overflow – in gorgeous marble and other precious stones, in splendid forms – of the glory of the God encountered in the person of Jesus Christ. No matter how splendid the altar, the heart of it is always the tabernacle with its humble vigil light, and in that tabernacle, the humble Lord of the Universe.

At the church of St. Peter in Chains, I marveled at the groups of people who were all agog at Michelangelo’s statue of Moses (the one with the horns), while – as it seems everywhere – there were only a handful of humble people who even acknowledge the Real Presence of that God before whom all human art is as nothing.

Refusing what she found an intimidating bath in Lourdes, Catholic writer Flannery O’Connor  once wrote: “When in Rome, do as you done in Milledgeville.”  Indeed.  And in Rome, as everywhere in the world, we adore and rejoice in the glory of the Eucharistic Lord, present in every tabernacle of the world, no matter how splendid or humble.  And we rejoice in a special way in His special friends, whose lives and martyrdoms witness to His love throughout all the ages, on whom He built His Church.

—Fr. Raymond Gawronski, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles

Matthew 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”

And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

6-28-2012

Saint Irenaeus, Bishop and Martyr

2 Kings 24: 8-17

The king of Babylon took him prisoner in the eighth year of his reign. He carried off all the treasures of the house of the Lord, and the treasures of the king’s house; he cut in pieces all the vessels of gold in the temple of the Lord, which King Solomon of Israel had made, all this as the Lord had foretold. He carried away all Jerusalem, all the officials, all the warriors, ten thousand captives, all the artisans and the smiths; no one remained, except the poorest people of the land. He carried away Jehoiachin to Babylon; the king’s mother, the king’s wives, his officials, and the elite of the land, he took into captivity from Jerusalem to Babylon.

The king of Babylon brought captive to Babylon all the men of valor, seven thousand, the artisans and the smiths, one thousand, all of them strong and fit for war. The king of Babylon made Mattaniah, Jehoiachin’s uncle, king in his place, and changed his name to Zedekiah.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

Ripples of Hope

Jechoiachin was eighteen years old when he became king of Juda, and he…sinned against the Lord. It was during his reign that the Babylonian army … marched against Jerusalem and…carried away as prisoners the people of Jerusalem —2 Kings 24:8-10,24

Josiah and Jeremiah failed to shake the complacency of Judah and to move the people to reform, as a nation. A warning came in the form of the Babylonian army. But it only brought Judah to her knees, not to her senses. Some people even boasted, saying in effect, “Our city and our Temple are still intact. See, God is protecting us!”

How complacent am I about the moral status of my personal life? Our nation?

Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope…Those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance. — Robert F. Kennedy

—Excerpted from Mission, by Fr. Mark Link, S.J. ©2000 RCL Enterprises, Inc., Allen TX. For more prayer resources from Fr. Link, please visit www.staygreat.com

Prayer

O my God, teach me to be generous: to serve you as you deserve to be served; to give without counting the cost; to fight without fear of being wounded; to work without seeking rest; and to spend myself without expecting any reward, but the knowledge that I am doing your holy will.

—Saint Ignatius


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord Jesus, teach me to be generous;

teach me to serve you as you deserve,

to give and not to count the cost,

to fight and not to heed the wounds,

to toil and not to seek for rest,

to labor and not to seek reward,

except that of knowing that I do your will.

Amen.  (Prayer for Generosity)

—St. Ignatius Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!