7-3-2012

Feast of St. Thomas, Apostle

John 20: 24-29

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came.. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side,  I will not believe.”

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side.  Do not doubt but believe.”Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me?  Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

The Eyes of Faith

Whether ordained or not, we have all heard at least two confessions these past few days. The first occurred on June 29, the Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, when at Mass we heard Peter’s famous confession of faith: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God!”  Immediately after this bold confession, Peter attempts to block Jesus from moving toward Jerusalem and the Cross.

Today we hear another apostle’s confession of faith, this time from the lips of St. Thomas after Jesus’ resurrection: “My Lord and my God!” Whereas Peter showed a lack of faith after his confession, Thomas’ “doubt” happened a week before his confession, when he refused to believe his brothers’ testimony.

You and I are among those whom Jesus calls “blessed” today because we believe He is truly our Lord and God without having seen him in the flesh. We see Jesus not with the eyes in our head but with those of our heart. We might reflect on this question: How or where do I most easily or frequently see Jesus with my own eyes of faith?

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel so strong in our belief. It’s easy to recognize your presence in our day. We feel protected from anxiety. All is well. But then that strong faith begins to wobble as the storms crash against our dreams, against the lives of those we love. This day we recommit to you. We know that you are a God of great patience, ever ready to forgive us. In those moments when we feel so distant from you, we trust that you are seeking us. Here we are, Lord. We do come to do your will.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel so strong in our belief. It’s easy to recognize your presence in our day. We feel protected from anxiety. All is well. But then that strong faith begins to wobble as the storms crash against our dreams, against the lives of those we love. This day we recommit to you. We know that you are a God of great patience, ever ready to forgive us. In those moments when we feel so distant from you, we trust that you are seeking us. Here we are, Lord. We do come to do your will.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Eyes of Faith

Whether ordained or not, we have all heard at least two confessions these past few days. The first occurred on June 29, the Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, when at Mass we heard Peter’s famous confession of faith: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God!”  Immediately after this bold confession, Peter attempts to block Jesus from moving toward Jerusalem and the Cross.

Today we hear another apostle’s confession of faith, this time from the lips of St. Thomas after Jesus’ resurrection: “My Lord and my God!” Whereas Peter showed a lack of faith after his confession, Thomas’ “doubt” happened a week before his confession, when he refused to believe his brothers’ testimony.

You and I are among those whom Jesus calls “blessed” today because we believe He is truly our Lord and God without having seen him in the flesh. We see Jesus not with the eyes in our head but with those of our heart. We might reflect on this question: How or where do I most easily or frequently see Jesus with my own eyes of faith?

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of St. Thomas, Apostle

John 20: 24-29

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.”Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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7-3-2012

Feast of St. Thomas, Apostle

John 20: 24-29

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came.. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side,  I will not believe.”

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side.  Do not doubt but believe.”Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me?  Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).

The Eyes of Faith

Whether ordained or not, we have all heard at least two confessions these past few days. The first occurred on June 29, the Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, when at Mass we heard Peter’s famous confession of faith: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God!”  Immediately after this bold confession, Peter attempts to block Jesus from moving toward Jerusalem and the Cross.

Today we hear another apostle’s confession of faith, this time from the lips of St. Thomas after Jesus’ resurrection: “My Lord and my God!” Whereas Peter showed a lack of faith after his confession, Thomas’ “doubt” happened a week before his confession, when he refused to believe his brothers’ testimony.

You and I are among those whom Jesus calls “blessed” today because we believe He is truly our Lord and God without having seen him in the flesh. We see Jesus not with the eyes in our head but with those of our heart. We might reflect on this question: How or where do I most easily or frequently see Jesus with my own eyes of faith?

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel so strong in our belief. It’s easy to recognize your presence in our day. We feel protected from anxiety. All is well. But then that strong faith begins to wobble as the storms crash against our dreams, against the lives of those we love. This day we recommit to you. We know that you are a God of great patience, ever ready to forgive us. In those moments when we feel so distant from you, we trust that you are seeking us. Here we are, Lord. We do come to do your will.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel so strong in our belief. It’s easy to recognize your presence in our day. We feel protected from anxiety. All is well. But then that strong faith begins to wobble as the storms crash against our dreams, against the lives of those we love. This day we recommit to you. We know that you are a God of great patience, ever ready to forgive us. In those moments when we feel so distant from you, we trust that you are seeking us. Here we are, Lord. We do come to do your will.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Eyes of Faith

Whether ordained or not, we have all heard at least two confessions these past few days. The first occurred on June 29, the Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, when at Mass we heard Peter’s famous confession of faith: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God!”  Immediately after this bold confession, Peter attempts to block Jesus from moving toward Jerusalem and the Cross.

Today we hear another apostle’s confession of faith, this time from the lips of St. Thomas after Jesus’ resurrection: “My Lord and my God!” Whereas Peter showed a lack of faith after his confession, Thomas’ “doubt” happened a week before his confession, when he refused to believe his brothers’ testimony.

You and I are among those whom Jesus calls “blessed” today because we believe He is truly our Lord and God without having seen him in the flesh. We see Jesus not with the eyes in our head but with those of our heart. We might reflect on this question: How or where do I most easily or frequently see Jesus with my own eyes of faith?

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of St. Thomas, Apostle

John 20: 24-29

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.”Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/ ).


Please share the Good Word with your friends!