7-11-2012

St. Benedict, Abbot

Matthew 10: 1-7

Then Jesus summoned his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to cure every disease and every sickness. These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon, also known as Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus;Simon the Cananaean, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed him.

These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Go nowhere among the Gentiles, and enter no town of the Samaritans,but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, proclaim the good news, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/

“Come and See”

St. Benedict of  Nursia, Italy, lived 480-547.  It is remarkable that his spiritual wisdom and practical approach to life continue to have a notable influence in the 21st century. This is because of his famous “Rule” of monastic life, written between 520 and 530, which transformed Western religious life for the next 600 years and is still followed today. Several passages in Benedict’s “Rule” mirror the invitation of Hosea in today’s first reading: “Sow for yourselves justice, reap the fruit of piety; break up for yourselves a new field, for it is time to seek the Lord.”

Today’s gospel invites us to look at the list of the twelve called by Jesus as the first apostles. They were simple men, local in their speech and manners. Jesus called them, inviting them to “come and see.” Religious women and men down the ages have followed similar invitations from Jesus to “come and see.” Indeed this invitation goes out to all Christian men and women. How we respond to that invitation in our daily living makes all the difference. Just what does that invitation of Jesus look like this July day in 2012?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord, sometimes the challenges of the day seem daunting. Can we really hold it all together or are we going to let the pieces fall apart? What about those invitations that call us out of our comfort zone – challenging our talents and our energies? The stress can build very quickly. You call us back to lean on you. We are not to face anything alone. If we desire service to you in all we do, your grace will sustain us, give us insights beyond our intellect, and provide the people and resources to follow your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes the challenges of the day seem daunting. Can we really hold it all together or are we going to let the pieces fall apart? What about those invitations that call us out of our comfort zone – challenging our talents and our energies?  The stress can build very quickly. You call us back to lean on you. We are not to face anything alone. If we desire service to you in all we do, your grace will sustain us, give us insights beyond our intellect, and provide the people and resources to follow your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“Come and See”

St. Benedict of Nursia, Italy, lived 480-547. It is remarkable that his spiritual wisdom and practical approach to life continue to have a notable influence in the 21st century. This is because of his famous “Rule” of monastic life, written between 520 and 530, which transformed Western religious life for the next 600 years and is still followed today. Several passages in Benedict’s “Rule” mirror the invitation of Hosea in today’s first reading: “Sow for yourselves justice, reap the fruit of piety; break up for yourselves a new field, for it is time to seek the Lord.”

Today’s gospel invites us to look at the list of the twelve called by Jesus as the first apostles. They were simple men, local in their speech and manners. Jesus called them, inviting them to “come and see.” Religious women and men down the ages have followed similar invitations from Jesus to “come and see.” Indeed this invitation goes out to all Christian men and women. How we respond to that invitation in our daily living makes all the difference. Just what does that invitation of Jesus look like this July day in 2012?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Benedict, Abbot

Matthew 10: 1-7

Then Jesus summoned his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to cure every disease and every sickness. These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon, also known as Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus;Simon the Cananaean, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed him.

These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Go nowhere among the Gentiles, and enter no town of the Samaritans,but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, proclaim the good news, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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7-11-2012

St. Benedict, Abbot

Matthew 10: 1-7

Then Jesus summoned his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to cure every disease and every sickness. These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon, also known as Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus;Simon the Cananaean, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed him.

These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Go nowhere among the Gentiles, and enter no town of the Samaritans,but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, proclaim the good news, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/

“Come and See”

St. Benedict of  Nursia, Italy, lived 480-547.  It is remarkable that his spiritual wisdom and practical approach to life continue to have a notable influence in the 21st century. This is because of his famous “Rule” of monastic life, written between 520 and 530, which transformed Western religious life for the next 600 years and is still followed today. Several passages in Benedict’s “Rule” mirror the invitation of Hosea in today’s first reading: “Sow for yourselves justice, reap the fruit of piety; break up for yourselves a new field, for it is time to seek the Lord.”

Today’s gospel invites us to look at the list of the twelve called by Jesus as the first apostles. They were simple men, local in their speech and manners. Jesus called them, inviting them to “come and see.” Religious women and men down the ages have followed similar invitations from Jesus to “come and see.” Indeed this invitation goes out to all Christian men and women. How we respond to that invitation in our daily living makes all the difference. Just what does that invitation of Jesus look like this July day in 2012?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord, sometimes the challenges of the day seem daunting. Can we really hold it all together or are we going to let the pieces fall apart? What about those invitations that call us out of our comfort zone – challenging our talents and our energies? The stress can build very quickly. You call us back to lean on you. We are not to face anything alone. If we desire service to you in all we do, your grace will sustain us, give us insights beyond our intellect, and provide the people and resources to follow your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes the challenges of the day seem daunting. Can we really hold it all together or are we going to let the pieces fall apart? What about those invitations that call us out of our comfort zone – challenging our talents and our energies?  The stress can build very quickly. You call us back to lean on you. We are not to face anything alone. If we desire service to you in all we do, your grace will sustain us, give us insights beyond our intellect, and provide the people and resources to follow your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“Come and See”

St. Benedict of Nursia, Italy, lived 480-547. It is remarkable that his spiritual wisdom and practical approach to life continue to have a notable influence in the 21st century. This is because of his famous “Rule” of monastic life, written between 520 and 530, which transformed Western religious life for the next 600 years and is still followed today. Several passages in Benedict’s “Rule” mirror the invitation of Hosea in today’s first reading: “Sow for yourselves justice, reap the fruit of piety; break up for yourselves a new field, for it is time to seek the Lord.”

Today’s gospel invites us to look at the list of the twelve called by Jesus as the first apostles. They were simple men, local in their speech and manners. Jesus called them, inviting them to “come and see.” Religious women and men down the ages have followed similar invitations from Jesus to “come and see.” Indeed this invitation goes out to all Christian men and women. How we respond to that invitation in our daily living makes all the difference. Just what does that invitation of Jesus look like this July day in 2012?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Benedict, Abbot

Matthew 10: 1-7

Then Jesus summoned his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to cure every disease and every sickness. These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon, also known as Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus;Simon the Cananaean, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed him.

These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Go nowhere among the Gentiles, and enter no town of the Samaritans,but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, proclaim the good news, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!