7-15-2012

Mark 6: 7-13

He called the twelve and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits. He ordered them to take nothing for their journey except a staff; no bread, no bag, no money in their belts; but to wear sandals and not to put on two tunics.He said to them, “Wherever you enter a house, stay there until you leave the place .If any place will not welcome you and they refuse to hear you, as you leave, shake off the dust that is on your feet as a testimony against them.” So they went out and proclaimed that all should repent. They cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/

Following Your Mission

What is your mission in life? The readings of today’s Mass speak of missions received from God. The first reading is about the prophet Amos, sent by God, and the Gospel is about Jesus sending out the twelve apostles. Jesus is particular strong with his apostles: their mission is to preach and to work miracles, but they are to take nothing with them, for God will provide what they need on their mission.

Mission is an important part of the life of all Christ’s followers, ourselves included. Our mission is probably more ordinary than that of a prophet or an apostle. Yet, St. Ignatius is very clear in the Spiritual Exercises that Jesus has a mission for everyone. Every follower of Christ must at some time in his life spend some time in prayer with the Lord to find the mission that is his. But most of our lives are spent living out that mission, rather than finding it. Living it can be much less exciting than the finding. Much of our lives, our mission is right in front of us, rather than someplace far off.

Our mission is in the family, in the workplace, in school, in the community. While we should be attentive to the voice of the Lord calling us elsewhere, the real challenge of Christian life is to see mission in the ordinary parts and times of life: to see our place and task here and now as a mission from God. That realization, kept active through our prayer, can change the complexion of everything that we do. And, just as Jesus impressed so strongly on his apostles that God would support them with everything they needed for their mission, so we can be confident that God will give us everything we need for ours.

—Fr. Matthew Monnig, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel like our mission is “no big deal.”  Sometimes we don’t even know if we have a mission or how to go about finding it. Other times our mission can paralyze us with fear — how will we ever live up to the expectations of the mission. And sometimes we see our mission over yonder with no way to bring it closer. We place our confidence in your, Lord. If we really listen to you, to those you bring into our lives and to the situations that call forth our growth, we will live a mission directed by you and one that brings forth our best.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel like our mission is “no big deal.”  Sometimes we don’t even know if we have a mission or how to go about finding it. Other times our mission can paralyze us with fear — how will we ever live up to the expectations of the mission. And sometimes we see our mission over yonder with no way to bring it closer. We place our confidence in your, Lord. If we really listen to you, to those you bring into our lives and to the situations that call forth our growth, we will live a mission directed by you and one that brings forth our best.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Following Your Mission

What is your mission in life? The readings of today’s Mass speak of missions received from God. The first reading is about the prophet Amos, sent by God, and the Gospel is about Jesus sending out the twelve apostles. Jesus is particular strong with his apostles: their mission is to preach and to work miracles, but they are to take nothing with them, for God will provide what they need on their mission.

Mission is an important part of the life of all Christ’s followers, ourselves included. Our mission is probably more ordinary than that of a prophet or an apostle. Yet, St. Ignatius is very clear in the Spiritual Exercises that Jesus has a mission for everyone. Every follower of Christ must at some time in his life spend some time in prayer with the Lord to find the mission that is his. But most of our lives are spent living out that mission, rather than finding it. Living it can be much less exciting than the finding. Much of our lives, our mission is right in front of us, rather than someplace far off.

Our mission is in the family, in the workplace, in school, in the community. While we should be attentive to the voice of the Lord calling us elsewhere, the real challenge of Christian life is to see mission in the ordinary parts and times of life: to see our place and task here and now as a mission from God. That realization, kept active through our prayer, can change the complexion of everything that we do. And, just as Jesus impressed so strongly on his apostles that God would support them with everything they needed for their mission, so we can be confident that God will give us everything we need for ours.

—Fr. Matthew Monnig, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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7-15-2012

Mark 6: 7-13

He called the twelve and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits. He ordered them to take nothing for their journey except a staff; no bread, no bag, no money in their belts; but to wear sandals and not to put on two tunics.He said to them, “Wherever you enter a house, stay there until you leave the place .If any place will not welcome you and they refuse to hear you, as you leave, shake off the dust that is on your feet as a testimony against them.” So they went out and proclaimed that all should repent. They cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations/

Following Your Mission

What is your mission in life? The readings of today’s Mass speak of missions received from God. The first reading is about the prophet Amos, sent by God, and the Gospel is about Jesus sending out the twelve apostles. Jesus is particular strong with his apostles: their mission is to preach and to work miracles, but they are to take nothing with them, for God will provide what they need on their mission.

Mission is an important part of the life of all Christ’s followers, ourselves included. Our mission is probably more ordinary than that of a prophet or an apostle. Yet, St. Ignatius is very clear in the Spiritual Exercises that Jesus has a mission for everyone. Every follower of Christ must at some time in his life spend some time in prayer with the Lord to find the mission that is his. But most of our lives are spent living out that mission, rather than finding it. Living it can be much less exciting than the finding. Much of our lives, our mission is right in front of us, rather than someplace far off.

Our mission is in the family, in the workplace, in school, in the community. While we should be attentive to the voice of the Lord calling us elsewhere, the real challenge of Christian life is to see mission in the ordinary parts and times of life: to see our place and task here and now as a mission from God. That realization, kept active through our prayer, can change the complexion of everything that we do. And, just as Jesus impressed so strongly on his apostles that God would support them with everything they needed for their mission, so we can be confident that God will give us everything we need for ours.

—Fr. Matthew Monnig, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel like our mission is “no big deal.”  Sometimes we don’t even know if we have a mission or how to go about finding it. Other times our mission can paralyze us with fear — how will we ever live up to the expectations of the mission. And sometimes we see our mission over yonder with no way to bring it closer. We place our confidence in your, Lord. If we really listen to you, to those you bring into our lives and to the situations that call forth our growth, we will live a mission directed by you and one that brings forth our best.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we feel like our mission is “no big deal.”  Sometimes we don’t even know if we have a mission or how to go about finding it. Other times our mission can paralyze us with fear — how will we ever live up to the expectations of the mission. And sometimes we see our mission over yonder with no way to bring it closer. We place our confidence in your, Lord. If we really listen to you, to those you bring into our lives and to the situations that call forth our growth, we will live a mission directed by you and one that brings forth our best.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Following Your Mission

What is your mission in life? The readings of today’s Mass speak of missions received from God. The first reading is about the prophet Amos, sent by God, and the Gospel is about Jesus sending out the twelve apostles. Jesus is particular strong with his apostles: their mission is to preach and to work miracles, but they are to take nothing with them, for God will provide what they need on their mission.

Mission is an important part of the life of all Christ’s followers, ourselves included. Our mission is probably more ordinary than that of a prophet or an apostle. Yet, St. Ignatius is very clear in the Spiritual Exercises that Jesus has a mission for everyone. Every follower of Christ must at some time in his life spend some time in prayer with the Lord to find the mission that is his. But most of our lives are spent living out that mission, rather than finding it. Living it can be much less exciting than the finding. Much of our lives, our mission is right in front of us, rather than someplace far off.

Our mission is in the family, in the workplace, in school, in the community. While we should be attentive to the voice of the Lord calling us elsewhere, the real challenge of Christian life is to see mission in the ordinary parts and times of life: to see our place and task here and now as a mission from God. That realization, kept active through our prayer, can change the complexion of everything that we do. And, just as Jesus impressed so strongly on his apostles that God would support them with everything they needed for their mission, so we can be confident that God will give us everything we need for ours.

—Fr. Matthew Monnig, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!