August 31, 2012

1 Corinthians 1: 17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart. ”Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world?

For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Leadership

Where is the wise one? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of the age? Has not God made the wisdom of the world foolish? [1 Corinthians 1:20]

I turn off the TV. I put down the newsmagazine. I am so weary of following the debates of world leaders and the talking heads of analysis. Is it that no one gets it, or that those who get it can’t personally afford to say so? I pray for courageous and visionary leaders and uncompromised sages.

Alice Camille, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2009 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com

Prayer

Lord, when we see those we love suffer with acute physical or mental pain, it can shake our confidence in you. When death steals away the lives of the young or crushes the life of someone who had battled so hard to regain health, we can even feel a sense of abandonment. Then we recall St. Paul’s reminder: “For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.” Though reason cannot explain the “why” for such hardships, we know that the cross transports us into eternal life. And through our earthly pain, we deepen our reliance on you and through our vulnerability we surrender our life to you and experience a security and hope that passes human understanding.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, when we see those we love suffer with acute physical or mental pain, it can shake our confidence in you. When death steals away the lives of the young or crushes the life of someone who had battled so hard to regain health, we can even feel a sense of abandonment. Then we recall St. Paul’s reminder: “For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.”  Though reason cannot explain the “why” for such hardships, we know that the cross transports us into eternal life. And through our earthly pain, we deepen our reliance on you and through our vulnerability we surrender our life to you and experience a security and hope that passes human understanding.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Leadership

Where is the wise one? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of the age? Has not God made the wisdom of the world foolish? [1 Corinthians 1:20]

I turn off the TV. I put down the newsmagazine. I am so weary of following the debates of world leaders and the talking heads of analysis. Is it that no one gets it, or that those who get it can’t personally afford to say so? I pray for courageous and visionary leaders and uncompromised sages.

Alice Camille, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2009 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

1 Corinthians 1: 17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart. ”Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world?

For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 30, 2012

Matthew 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this:if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into.Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour. “Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time?

Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Stay Awake

The bell rang at 4 am, several times and loud enough to rouse anyone from sleep. It wasn’t a particularly pleasant sound, but then again most things that jar one out of slumber aren’t particularly pleasant. A few minutes passed, giving everyone enough time to wake themselves up and make their way to the abbey church, where the night time office of Vigils would begin. Soon enough the bell rang again and someone began the solemn chanting, “Lord open my lips, and my mouth will proclaim your praise.” Each morning, as I was making my retreat as a guest of the monastery, the psalms and readings would go on and on. Sometimes I had profound experiences of prayer. Most of the time, though, I was just tired. I thought to myself, “Didn’t we pray this psalm already today?” I found myself thankful when the psalms that morning were the shorter ones. Vigilance is not easy.

The monastic life enfleshes in concrete practices the admonition of our Lord to “stay awake!” These monks, day in and day out, choose the time of the day most prone to sleeping and dreaming, and they wake up to pray. It is a symbolic action with a message for each and every one of us, even if we cannot imitate their schedule. The Lord advises us to be ready at all times, since He is returning at any moment. Whether we are working, relaxing, spending time with family or friends, at prayer or resting, an attitude of vigilance should pervade our whole life. We should be ready and waiting when He returns, “So too, you also must be prepared, for at an hour you do not expect, the Son of Man will come.”

—Mr. Timothy Kieras, SJ

Prayer

Lord, an Indian proverb reminds us that when the sun goes down at sunset, it will take a part of our life with it. Help us, Lord, to live with no regrets. Are there talents we have not explored? Are there dreams that we have toyed with but have not given the proper attention? Are there friendships that we have put to the side until our lives slow down? Has our sense of gratitude become dulled? Do we keep looking to the future when we will finally focus on our spirituality? This day, Lord, we want to live in the now, present to all the good things in our lives. We ask for your wisdom so we do give priority to that which really matters. Abolish our regrets as we seek to find you in the ordinary twists and turns of the day.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, an Indian proverb reminds us that when the sun goes down at sunset, it will take a part of our life with it. Help us, Lord, to live with no regrets. Are there talents we have not explored? Are there dreams that we have toyed with but have not given the proper attention? Are there friendships that we have put to the side until our lives slow down? Has our sense of gratitude become dulled? Do we keep looking to the future when we will finally focus on our spirituality? This day, Lord, we want to live in the now, present to all the good things in our lives. We ask for your wisdom so we do give priority to that which really matters.  Abolish our regrets as we seek to find you in the ordinary twists and turns of the day.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Stay Awake

The bell rang at 4 am, several times and loud enough to rouse anyone from sleep. It wasn’t a particularly pleasant sound, but then again most things that jar one out of slumber aren’t particularly pleasant. A few minutes passed, giving everyone enough time to wake themselves up and make their way to the abbey church, where the night time office of Vigils would begin. Soon enough the bell rang again and someone began the solemn chanting, “Lord open my lips, and my mouth will proclaim your praise.” Each morning, as I was making my retreat as a guest of the monastery, the psalms and readings would go on and on. Sometimes I had profound experiences of prayer. Most of the time, though, I was just tired. I thought to myself, “Didn’t we pray this psalm already today?” I found myself thankful when the psalms that morning were the shorter ones. Vigilance is not easy.

The monastic life enfleshes in concrete practices the admonition of our Lord to “stay awake!” These monks, day in and day out, choose the time of the day most prone to sleeping and dreaming, and they wake up to pray. It is a symbolic action with a message for each and every one of us, even if we cannot imitate their schedule. The Lord advises us to be ready at all times, since He is returning at any moment. Whether we are working, relaxing, spending time with family or friends, at prayer or resting, an attitude of vigilance should pervade our whole life. We should be ready and waiting when He returns, “So too, you also must be prepared, for at an hour you do not expect, the Son of Man will come.”

 —Mr. Timothy Kieras, SJ


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Matthew 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour. “Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time?

Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 29, 2012

Passion of John the Baptist

Mark 6: 17-29

For Herod himself had sent men who arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because Herod had married her. For John had been telling Herod, “It is not lawful for you to have your brother’s wife.” And Herodias had a grudge against him, and wanted to kill him. But she could not, for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he protected him. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed; and yet he liked to listen to him. But an opportunity came when Herod on his birthday gave a banquet for his courtiers and officers and for the leaders of Galilee.

When his daughter Herodias came in and danced, she pleased Herod and his guests; and the king said to the girl, “Ask me for whatever you wish, and I will give it.” And he solemnly swore to her, “Whatever you ask me, I will give you, even half of my kingdom.” She went out and said to her mother, “What should I ask for?” She replied, “The head of John the baptizer.”

Immediately she rushed back to the king and requested, “I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter.” The king was deeply grieved; yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he did not want to refuse her. Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John’s head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the girl. Then the girl gave it to her mother. When his disciples heard about it, they came and took his body, and laid it in a tomb.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

A Warning

An innocent man loses his life so that a guilty man can save his honor. This ancient atrocity is repeated year after year as we defend our national and personal pride, no matter the cost in innocent lives or to the poor andhelpless. May we be as critical of our own strategies as we are of Herod.

—Margaret Silf, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2010 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com

Prayer

Lord, why is it more common for people to betray one another than to defend the person wrongly accused? It happens every day in the work place, in social gatherings, and in daily conversations. When position, power, image, and likeability are threatened, we frequently possess a styrofoam backbone that crumbles as the other’s reputation is decimated.

To escape the behavior of the everyday traitor, we must surrender to you and fill up on your love and protection.  Surround us with co-workers, family members, and friends who strengthen our resolve to face conflict with truth and to remain loyal to the one wrongly accused.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, why is it more common for people to betray one another than to defend the person wrongly accused? It happens every day in the work place, in social gatherings, and in daily conversations. When position, power, image, and likeability are threatened, we frequently possess a styrofoam backbone that crumbles as the other’s reputation is decimated.

To escape the behavior of the everyday traitor, we must surrender to you and fill up on your love and protection.  Surround us with co-workers, family members, and friends who strengthen our resolve to face conflict with truth and to remain loyal to the one wrongly accused.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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August 31, 2012

1 Corinthians 1: 17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart. ”Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world?

For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Leadership

Where is the wise one? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of the age? Has not God made the wisdom of the world foolish? [1 Corinthians 1:20]

I turn off the TV. I put down the newsmagazine. I am so weary of following the debates of world leaders and the talking heads of analysis. Is it that no one gets it, or that those who get it can’t personally afford to say so? I pray for courageous and visionary leaders and uncompromised sages.

Alice Camille, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2009 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com

Prayer

Lord, when we see those we love suffer with acute physical or mental pain, it can shake our confidence in you. When death steals away the lives of the young or crushes the life of someone who had battled so hard to regain health, we can even feel a sense of abandonment. Then we recall St. Paul’s reminder: “For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.” Though reason cannot explain the “why” for such hardships, we know that the cross transports us into eternal life. And through our earthly pain, we deepen our reliance on you and through our vulnerability we surrender our life to you and experience a security and hope that passes human understanding.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, when we see those we love suffer with acute physical or mental pain, it can shake our confidence in you. When death steals away the lives of the young or crushes the life of someone who had battled so hard to regain health, we can even feel a sense of abandonment. Then we recall St. Paul’s reminder: “For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.”  Though reason cannot explain the “why” for such hardships, we know that the cross transports us into eternal life. And through our earthly pain, we deepen our reliance on you and through our vulnerability we surrender our life to you and experience a security and hope that passes human understanding.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Leadership

Where is the wise one? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of the age? Has not God made the wisdom of the world foolish? [1 Corinthians 1:20]

I turn off the TV. I put down the newsmagazine. I am so weary of following the debates of world leaders and the talking heads of analysis. Is it that no one gets it, or that those who get it can’t personally afford to say so? I pray for courageous and visionary leaders and uncompromised sages.

Alice Camille, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2009 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

1 Corinthians 1: 17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart. ”Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world?

For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 30, 2012

Matthew 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this:if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into.Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour. “Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time?

Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Stay Awake

The bell rang at 4 am, several times and loud enough to rouse anyone from sleep. It wasn’t a particularly pleasant sound, but then again most things that jar one out of slumber aren’t particularly pleasant. A few minutes passed, giving everyone enough time to wake themselves up and make their way to the abbey church, where the night time office of Vigils would begin. Soon enough the bell rang again and someone began the solemn chanting, “Lord open my lips, and my mouth will proclaim your praise.” Each morning, as I was making my retreat as a guest of the monastery, the psalms and readings would go on and on. Sometimes I had profound experiences of prayer. Most of the time, though, I was just tired. I thought to myself, “Didn’t we pray this psalm already today?” I found myself thankful when the psalms that morning were the shorter ones. Vigilance is not easy.

The monastic life enfleshes in concrete practices the admonition of our Lord to “stay awake!” These monks, day in and day out, choose the time of the day most prone to sleeping and dreaming, and they wake up to pray. It is a symbolic action with a message for each and every one of us, even if we cannot imitate their schedule. The Lord advises us to be ready at all times, since He is returning at any moment. Whether we are working, relaxing, spending time with family or friends, at prayer or resting, an attitude of vigilance should pervade our whole life. We should be ready and waiting when He returns, “So too, you also must be prepared, for at an hour you do not expect, the Son of Man will come.”

—Mr. Timothy Kieras, SJ

Prayer

Lord, an Indian proverb reminds us that when the sun goes down at sunset, it will take a part of our life with it. Help us, Lord, to live with no regrets. Are there talents we have not explored? Are there dreams that we have toyed with but have not given the proper attention? Are there friendships that we have put to the side until our lives slow down? Has our sense of gratitude become dulled? Do we keep looking to the future when we will finally focus on our spirituality? This day, Lord, we want to live in the now, present to all the good things in our lives. We ask for your wisdom so we do give priority to that which really matters. Abolish our regrets as we seek to find you in the ordinary twists and turns of the day.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, an Indian proverb reminds us that when the sun goes down at sunset, it will take a part of our life with it. Help us, Lord, to live with no regrets. Are there talents we have not explored? Are there dreams that we have toyed with but have not given the proper attention? Are there friendships that we have put to the side until our lives slow down? Has our sense of gratitude become dulled? Do we keep looking to the future when we will finally focus on our spirituality? This day, Lord, we want to live in the now, present to all the good things in our lives. We ask for your wisdom so we do give priority to that which really matters.  Abolish our regrets as we seek to find you in the ordinary twists and turns of the day.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Stay Awake

The bell rang at 4 am, several times and loud enough to rouse anyone from sleep. It wasn’t a particularly pleasant sound, but then again most things that jar one out of slumber aren’t particularly pleasant. A few minutes passed, giving everyone enough time to wake themselves up and make their way to the abbey church, where the night time office of Vigils would begin. Soon enough the bell rang again and someone began the solemn chanting, “Lord open my lips, and my mouth will proclaim your praise.” Each morning, as I was making my retreat as a guest of the monastery, the psalms and readings would go on and on. Sometimes I had profound experiences of prayer. Most of the time, though, I was just tired. I thought to myself, “Didn’t we pray this psalm already today?” I found myself thankful when the psalms that morning were the shorter ones. Vigilance is not easy.

The monastic life enfleshes in concrete practices the admonition of our Lord to “stay awake!” These monks, day in and day out, choose the time of the day most prone to sleeping and dreaming, and they wake up to pray. It is a symbolic action with a message for each and every one of us, even if we cannot imitate their schedule. The Lord advises us to be ready at all times, since He is returning at any moment. Whether we are working, relaxing, spending time with family or friends, at prayer or resting, an attitude of vigilance should pervade our whole life. We should be ready and waiting when He returns, “So too, you also must be prepared, for at an hour you do not expect, the Son of Man will come.”

 —Mr. Timothy Kieras, SJ


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Matthew 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour. “Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time?

Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 29, 2012

Passion of John the Baptist

Mark 6: 17-29

For Herod himself had sent men who arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because Herod had married her. For John had been telling Herod, “It is not lawful for you to have your brother’s wife.” And Herodias had a grudge against him, and wanted to kill him. But she could not, for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he protected him. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed; and yet he liked to listen to him. But an opportunity came when Herod on his birthday gave a banquet for his courtiers and officers and for the leaders of Galilee.

When his daughter Herodias came in and danced, she pleased Herod and his guests; and the king said to the girl, “Ask me for whatever you wish, and I will give it.” And he solemnly swore to her, “Whatever you ask me, I will give you, even half of my kingdom.” She went out and said to her mother, “What should I ask for?” She replied, “The head of John the baptizer.”

Immediately she rushed back to the king and requested, “I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter.” The king was deeply grieved; yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he did not want to refuse her. Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John’s head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the girl. Then the girl gave it to her mother. When his disciples heard about it, they came and took his body, and laid it in a tomb.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

A Warning

An innocent man loses his life so that a guilty man can save his honor. This ancient atrocity is repeated year after year as we defend our national and personal pride, no matter the cost in innocent lives or to the poor andhelpless. May we be as critical of our own strategies as we are of Herod.

—Margaret Silf, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2010 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com

Prayer

Lord, why is it more common for people to betray one another than to defend the person wrongly accused? It happens every day in the work place, in social gatherings, and in daily conversations. When position, power, image, and likeability are threatened, we frequently possess a styrofoam backbone that crumbles as the other’s reputation is decimated.

To escape the behavior of the everyday traitor, we must surrender to you and fill up on your love and protection.  Surround us with co-workers, family members, and friends who strengthen our resolve to face conflict with truth and to remain loyal to the one wrongly accused.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, why is it more common for people to betray one another than to defend the person wrongly accused? It happens every day in the work place, in social gatherings, and in daily conversations. When position, power, image, and likeability are threatened, we frequently possess a styrofoam backbone that crumbles as the other’s reputation is decimated.

To escape the behavior of the everyday traitor, we must surrender to you and fill up on your love and protection.  Surround us with co-workers, family members, and friends who strengthen our resolve to face conflict with truth and to remain loyal to the one wrongly accused.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!