September 9, 2012

Mark 7: 31-37

Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue.

Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

 “My Crucified Jesus”

The Third “Week” of the Spiritual Exercises, that is, its third movement or theme, centers on the Lord’s Passion and death. St. Ignatius understood that the zeal and holy desires enflamed in the Second Week, with its focus on Jesus’s person, teachings and manner of life, are tested by our ability to stay close to Him in His suffering, as well as our willingness to carry the cross (or crosses) God permits for us. The Lord does not want “fair weather” disciples who follow only when it’s easy or enjoyable, but true disciples who live their faith when storms strike.

Crucifixes adorn our Catholic homes, schools, hospitals and parishes, yet often they become invisible. When was the last time you took a long, loving, wondrous gaze upon that crucifix in your bedroom or at the end of your Rosary? Last weekend a man on retreat here at Demontreville shared with me a prayer he recites daily on his knees before a crucifix. Perhaps we might consider doing the same:

My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred head
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every thought of mine today
Be an act of love for you.
My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred hands
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every work of my hands today
Be an act of love for you.

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, throughout this day I will experience many occasions that need my best listening. It is so difficult to listen and not use that time to prepare my response. It takes such discipline and humility not to interrupt the other and truly seek first to understand then to be understood.  Just as you helped the deaf man to hear, I, too, want to be present to the other as I focus on their words, the tone of their voice, and the look in their eyes. And when I respond, help my comments be focused in the truth and ever mindful of the other’s dignity.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, throughout this day I will experience many occasions that need my best listening. It is so difficult to listen and not use that time to prepare my response. It takes such discipline and humility not to interrupt the other and truly seek first to understand then to be understood.  Just as you helped the deaf man to hear, I, too, want to be present to the other as I focus on their words, the tone of their voice, and the look in their eyes. And when I respond, help my comments be focused in the truth and ever mindful of the other’s dignity.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“My Crucified Jesus”

The Third “Week” of the Spiritual Exercises, that is, its third movement or theme, centers on the Lord’s Passion and death. St. Ignatius understood that the zeal and holy desires enflamed in the Second Week, with its focus on Jesus’s person, teachings and manner of life, are tested by our ability to stay close to Him in His suffering, as well as our willingness to carry the cross (or crosses) God permits for us. The Lord does not want “fair weather” disciples who follow only when it’s easy or enjoyable, but true disciples who live their faith when storms strike.

Crucifixes adorn our Catholic homes, schools, hospitals and parishes, yet often they become invisible. When was the last time you took a long, loving, wondrous gaze upon that crucifix in your bedroom or at the end of your Rosary? Last weekend a man on retreat here at Demontreville shared with me a prayer he recites daily on his knees before a crucifix. Perhaps we might consider doing the same:

My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred head
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every thought of mine today
Be an act of love for you.
My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred hands
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every work of my hands today
Be an act of love for you.

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 7: 31-37

Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue.

Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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September 9, 2012

Mark 7: 31-37

Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue.

Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

 “My Crucified Jesus”

The Third “Week” of the Spiritual Exercises, that is, its third movement or theme, centers on the Lord’s Passion and death. St. Ignatius understood that the zeal and holy desires enflamed in the Second Week, with its focus on Jesus’s person, teachings and manner of life, are tested by our ability to stay close to Him in His suffering, as well as our willingness to carry the cross (or crosses) God permits for us. The Lord does not want “fair weather” disciples who follow only when it’s easy or enjoyable, but true disciples who live their faith when storms strike.

Crucifixes adorn our Catholic homes, schools, hospitals and parishes, yet often they become invisible. When was the last time you took a long, loving, wondrous gaze upon that crucifix in your bedroom or at the end of your Rosary? Last weekend a man on retreat here at Demontreville shared with me a prayer he recites daily on his knees before a crucifix. Perhaps we might consider doing the same:

My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred head
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every thought of mine today
Be an act of love for you.
My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred hands
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every work of my hands today
Be an act of love for you.

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, throughout this day I will experience many occasions that need my best listening. It is so difficult to listen and not use that time to prepare my response. It takes such discipline and humility not to interrupt the other and truly seek first to understand then to be understood.  Just as you helped the deaf man to hear, I, too, want to be present to the other as I focus on their words, the tone of their voice, and the look in their eyes. And when I respond, help my comments be focused in the truth and ever mindful of the other’s dignity.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, throughout this day I will experience many occasions that need my best listening. It is so difficult to listen and not use that time to prepare my response. It takes such discipline and humility not to interrupt the other and truly seek first to understand then to be understood.  Just as you helped the deaf man to hear, I, too, want to be present to the other as I focus on their words, the tone of their voice, and the look in their eyes. And when I respond, help my comments be focused in the truth and ever mindful of the other’s dignity.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“My Crucified Jesus”

The Third “Week” of the Spiritual Exercises, that is, its third movement or theme, centers on the Lord’s Passion and death. St. Ignatius understood that the zeal and holy desires enflamed in the Second Week, with its focus on Jesus’s person, teachings and manner of life, are tested by our ability to stay close to Him in His suffering, as well as our willingness to carry the cross (or crosses) God permits for us. The Lord does not want “fair weather” disciples who follow only when it’s easy or enjoyable, but true disciples who live their faith when storms strike.

Crucifixes adorn our Catholic homes, schools, hospitals and parishes, yet often they become invisible. When was the last time you took a long, loving, wondrous gaze upon that crucifix in your bedroom or at the end of your Rosary? Last weekend a man on retreat here at Demontreville shared with me a prayer he recites daily on his knees before a crucifix. Perhaps we might consider doing the same:

My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred head
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every thought of mine today
Be an act of love for you.
My crucified Jesus I adore
The wounds in thy sacred hands
With a sorrow deep and true,
May every work of my hands today
Be an act of love for you.

—Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 7: 31-37

Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue.

Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!