October 10, 2012

Luke 11: 1-4

He was praying in a certain place, and after he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.” He said to them, “When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us. And do not bring us to the time of trial.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Praise God

Saint Ignatius tells us that we are to praise, reverence, and serve God above all. Indeed, it is the reason that we were created. Those schooled in the Baltimore Catechism, however, may first think our reason for being is to know, love and serve God. Is there a reasonable account for the discrepancy between the formulas?

St. Ignatius’ formulation of the purpose of our being is ingenious because it captures the fruit of what it means to know, love and serve God; when one truly knows and loves God, one necessarily reverences and praises Him.

To reverence God is to manifest a profound respect for Him. This reverence is at the heart of what was once commonly referred to as “fear of the Lord” but is now softened to “awe of the Lord.”  Truly, there is no way to know God without recognizing that He is Almighty.  He is our loving master, our Father in the truest sense of the word.

To praise God is the natural consequence of loving Him. To know God and all that He has done for us kindles a profound sense of gratitude within our hearts, so that praise cannot help but come forth from our lips. When we love God, we cannot help but praise Him because our hearts cannot contain in secret the love we have for our true Father.

—Fr. John Brown, S.J.

Prayer

The Our Father is the oldest of Christian prayers, taught by Jesus to his disciples. Because the prayer came from Christ, it is used in every Mass. Before you pray the Our Father, ask his Spirit to touch your being as you meditate on each word.

The Our Father

Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

The Our Father is the oldest of Christian prayers, taught by Jesus to his disciples. Because the prayer came from Christ, it is used in every Mass. Before you pray the Our Father, ask his Spirit to touch your being as you meditate on each word.

The Our Father

Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Praise God

Saint Ignatius tells us that we are to praise, reverence, and serve God above all. Indeed, it is the reason that we were created. Those schooled in the Baltimore Catechism, however, may first think our reason for being is to know, love and serve God. Is there a reasonable account for the discrepancy between the formulas?

St. Ignatius’ formulation of the purpose of our being is ingenious because it captures the fruit of what it means to know, love and serve God; when one truly knows and loves God, one necessarily reverences and praises Him.

To reverence God is to manifest a profound respect for Him. This reverence is at the heart of what was once commonly referred to as “fear of the Lord” but is now softened to “awe of the Lord.”  Truly, there is no way to know God without recognizing that He is Almighty.  He is our loving master, our Father in the truest sense of the word.

To praise God is the natural consequence of loving Him. To know God and all that He has done for us kindles a profound sense of gratitude within our hearts, so that praise cannot help but come forth from our lips. When we love God, we cannot help but praise Him because our hearts cannot contain in secret the love we have for our true Father.

—Fr. John Brown, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 11: 1-4

He was praying in a certain place, and after he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.” He said to them, “When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us. And do not bring us to the time of trial.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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October 10, 2012

Luke 11: 1-4

He was praying in a certain place, and after he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.” He said to them, “When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us. And do not bring us to the time of trial.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Praise God

Saint Ignatius tells us that we are to praise, reverence, and serve God above all. Indeed, it is the reason that we were created. Those schooled in the Baltimore Catechism, however, may first think our reason for being is to know, love and serve God. Is there a reasonable account for the discrepancy between the formulas?

St. Ignatius’ formulation of the purpose of our being is ingenious because it captures the fruit of what it means to know, love and serve God; when one truly knows and loves God, one necessarily reverences and praises Him.

To reverence God is to manifest a profound respect for Him. This reverence is at the heart of what was once commonly referred to as “fear of the Lord” but is now softened to “awe of the Lord.”  Truly, there is no way to know God without recognizing that He is Almighty.  He is our loving master, our Father in the truest sense of the word.

To praise God is the natural consequence of loving Him. To know God and all that He has done for us kindles a profound sense of gratitude within our hearts, so that praise cannot help but come forth from our lips. When we love God, we cannot help but praise Him because our hearts cannot contain in secret the love we have for our true Father.

—Fr. John Brown, S.J.

Prayer

The Our Father is the oldest of Christian prayers, taught by Jesus to his disciples. Because the prayer came from Christ, it is used in every Mass. Before you pray the Our Father, ask his Spirit to touch your being as you meditate on each word.

The Our Father

Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

The Our Father is the oldest of Christian prayers, taught by Jesus to his disciples. Because the prayer came from Christ, it is used in every Mass. Before you pray the Our Father, ask his Spirit to touch your being as you meditate on each word.

The Our Father

Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Praise God

Saint Ignatius tells us that we are to praise, reverence, and serve God above all. Indeed, it is the reason that we were created. Those schooled in the Baltimore Catechism, however, may first think our reason for being is to know, love and serve God. Is there a reasonable account for the discrepancy between the formulas?

St. Ignatius’ formulation of the purpose of our being is ingenious because it captures the fruit of what it means to know, love and serve God; when one truly knows and loves God, one necessarily reverences and praises Him.

To reverence God is to manifest a profound respect for Him. This reverence is at the heart of what was once commonly referred to as “fear of the Lord” but is now softened to “awe of the Lord.”  Truly, there is no way to know God without recognizing that He is Almighty.  He is our loving master, our Father in the truest sense of the word.

To praise God is the natural consequence of loving Him. To know God and all that He has done for us kindles a profound sense of gratitude within our hearts, so that praise cannot help but come forth from our lips. When we love God, we cannot help but praise Him because our hearts cannot contain in secret the love we have for our true Father.

—Fr. John Brown, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 11: 1-4

He was praying in a certain place, and after he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.” He said to them, “When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us. And do not bring us to the time of trial.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!