December 17, 2012

Matthew 1: 1-17

An account of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham was the father of Isaac, and Isaac the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers,and Judah the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar, and Perez the father of Hezron, and Hezron the father of Aram, and Aram the father of Aminadab, and Aminadab the father of Nahshon, and Nahshon the father of Salmon, and Salmon the father of Boaz by Rahab, and Boaz the father of Obed by Ruth, and Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of King David.

And David was the father of Solomon by the wife of Uriah, and Solomon the father of Rehoboam, and Rehoboam the father of Abijah, and Abijah the father of Asaph, and Asaph the father of Jehoshaphat, and Jehoshaphat the father of Joram, and Joram the father of Uzziah, and Uzziah the father of Jotham, and Jotham the father of Ahaz, and Ahaz the father of Hezekiah, and Hezekiah the father of Manasseh, and Manasseh the father of Amos, and Amos the father of Josiah, and Josiah the father of Jechoniah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon.

And after the deportation to Babylon: Jechoniah was the father of Salathiel, and Salathiel the father of Zerubbabel, and Zerubbabel the father of Abiud, and Abiud the father of Eliakim, and Eliakim the father of Azor, and Azor the father of Zadok, and Zadok the father of Achim, and Achim the father of Eliud, and Eliud the father of Eleazar, and Eleazar the father of Matthan, and Matthan the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom Jesus was born, who is called the Messiah. So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David to the deportation to Babylon, fourteen generations; and from the deportation to Babylon to the Messiah, fourteen generations.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Dimensions of O Come, O Come, Emmanuel

Although many of us know the Advent hymn O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, we not appreciate some interesting aspects of this traditional hymn. O Come, O Come, Emmanuel is a collection of seven different antiphons sung at Vespers (or evening prayer), beginning on December 17 and continuing until the Vespers of December 23, the day before the vigil of Christmas.

Each antiphon has a designation or title given to Jesus with rich resonance back to the Hebrew Scriptures. The following are the designations given to the Messiah as taken from the Hebrew Scriptures, followed by the appropriate days on which the opening words are sung:

December 17:   O Sapentia    O Wisdom O Holy Word of God
December 18:   O Adonai      O Lord of Ancient Israel
December 19:   O Radix Jesse     O Flower of the Root of Jesse
December 20:   O Clavis David    O Key of David
December 21:   O Oriens          O Radiant Dawn
December 22:   O Rex Gentium     O King of All Nations
December 23:   O Emmanuel        O Lord With us.

In addition to proclaiming the titles of the savior, this set of antiphons also announces the nearness of Jesus’ birth. If you reverse the order of the words, beginning with Emmanuel on December 23, and then take the first letter of each word, you discover the Latin phrase Ero cras, which means “Tomorrow I will be here.” The following day is of course December 24, the eve of Christmas.

And they figured all this out in the 700s without a computer!

—Fr. Michael Maher, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, you watch over us as we move through the intricacies of our lives. You are King of all the Nations and you are Lord with us. You are God Almighty, creator of all and Mary’s baby boy. We are awed by your majesty; we find our purpose in your love.  Lord, let this day be our thank you gift to you.  We will be more observant of the many blessings in our lives and more attentive to the needs and joys of those we love.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


Get our FREE App

Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
     12
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
    123
45678910
       
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

December 17, 2012

Matthew 1: 1-17

An account of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham was the father of Isaac, and Isaac the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers,and Judah the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar, and Perez the father of Hezron, and Hezron the father of Aram, and Aram the father of Aminadab, and Aminadab the father of Nahshon, and Nahshon the father of Salmon, and Salmon the father of Boaz by Rahab, and Boaz the father of Obed by Ruth, and Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of King David.

And David was the father of Solomon by the wife of Uriah, and Solomon the father of Rehoboam, and Rehoboam the father of Abijah, and Abijah the father of Asaph, and Asaph the father of Jehoshaphat, and Jehoshaphat the father of Joram, and Joram the father of Uzziah, and Uzziah the father of Jotham, and Jotham the father of Ahaz, and Ahaz the father of Hezekiah, and Hezekiah the father of Manasseh, and Manasseh the father of Amos, and Amos the father of Josiah, and Josiah the father of Jechoniah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon.

And after the deportation to Babylon: Jechoniah was the father of Salathiel, and Salathiel the father of Zerubbabel, and Zerubbabel the father of Abiud, and Abiud the father of Eliakim, and Eliakim the father of Azor, and Azor the father of Zadok, and Zadok the father of Achim, and Achim the father of Eliud, and Eliud the father of Eleazar, and Eleazar the father of Matthan, and Matthan the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom Jesus was born, who is called the Messiah. So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David to the deportation to Babylon, fourteen generations; and from the deportation to Babylon to the Messiah, fourteen generations.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Dimensions of O Come, O Come, Emmanuel

Although many of us know the Advent hymn O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, we not appreciate some interesting aspects of this traditional hymn. O Come, O Come, Emmanuel is a collection of seven different antiphons sung at Vespers (or evening prayer), beginning on December 17 and continuing until the Vespers of December 23, the day before the vigil of Christmas.

Each antiphon has a designation or title given to Jesus with rich resonance back to the Hebrew Scriptures. The following are the designations given to the Messiah as taken from the Hebrew Scriptures, followed by the appropriate days on which the opening words are sung:

December 17:   O Sapentia    O Wisdom O Holy Word of God
December 18:   O Adonai      O Lord of Ancient Israel
December 19:   O Radix Jesse     O Flower of the Root of Jesse
December 20:   O Clavis David    O Key of David
December 21:   O Oriens          O Radiant Dawn
December 22:   O Rex Gentium     O King of All Nations
December 23:   O Emmanuel        O Lord With us.

In addition to proclaiming the titles of the savior, this set of antiphons also announces the nearness of Jesus’ birth. If you reverse the order of the words, beginning with Emmanuel on December 23, and then take the first letter of each word, you discover the Latin phrase Ero cras, which means “Tomorrow I will be here.” The following day is of course December 24, the eve of Christmas.

And they figured all this out in the 700s without a computer!

—Fr. Michael Maher, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, you watch over us as we move through the intricacies of our lives. You are King of all the Nations and you are Lord with us. You are God Almighty, creator of all and Mary’s baby boy. We are awed by your majesty; we find our purpose in your love.  Lord, let this day be our thank you gift to you.  We will be more observant of the many blessings in our lives and more attentive to the needs and joys of those we love.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!