January 21, 2013

Feast of St. Agnes

Hebrew 5: 1-10

Every high priest chosen from among mortals is put in charge of things pertaining to God on their behalf, to offer gifts and sacrifices for sins. He is able to deal gently with the ignorant and wayward, since he himself is subject to weakness; and because of this he must offer sacrifice for his own sins as well as for those of the people.

And one does not presume to take this honor, but takes it only when called by God, just as Aaron was. So also Christ did not glorify himself in becoming a high priest, but was appointed by the one who said to him, “You are my Son, today I have begotten you”; as he says also in another place, “You are a priest forever, according to the order of Melchizedek.”

In the days of his flesh, Jesus offered up prayers and supplications, with loud cries and tears, to the one who was able to save him from death, and he was heard because of his reverent submission. Although he was a Son, he learned obedience through what he suffered; and having been made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him, having been designated by God a high priest according to the order of Melchizedek.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Model of Obedience

Jesus learned through his sufferings to be obedient. When he was made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all those who obey him. [Hebrews 5: 8-9]

A little boy hated stewed prunes. Somehow he managed to eat all but two. His mother insisted that he eat these as well. He refused, so she sent him to bed, saying “God can’t stand disobedient boys; he gets very, very angry at them!”

That night a violent storm blew up. Lightning flashed and thunder crashed. The mother feared that her son would be frightened to death. So she went to his room to comfort him. She found him at the window, staring out into the storm and saying, “All that fuss over two prunes!”

What is my main motive for obeying God’s law—fear or love?  How strong is that motive?

I’ll go where you want me to go, dear Lord,
O’er mountain or plain or sea;
I’ll say what you want me to say, dear Lord,
I’ll be what you want me to be. 

—Mary Brown

—Excerpted from Action, by Fr. Mark Link, S.J. ©2000 RCL Enterprises, Inc., Allen TX. For more prayer resources from Fr. Link, please visit www.staygreat.com

Prayer

“He who remembers the presence of God is less open to other thoughts, especially bad thoughts.  As long as we believe that God sees us, we are restrained from daring to sin before such a Witness and Judge.  In two ways the presence of God is an antidote against sin:  First, because God sees us, and secondly because we see God.” — St. Ignatius of Loyola

Lord, ultimately all will be well.  Loss, suffering, and death will not have the final word.  For you are here and we are ready to do your will.  May the words of St. Ignatius of Loyola be alive in our attitudes and choices today.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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January 21, 2013

Feast of St. Agnes

Hebrew 5: 1-10

Every high priest chosen from among mortals is put in charge of things pertaining to God on their behalf, to offer gifts and sacrifices for sins. He is able to deal gently with the ignorant and wayward, since he himself is subject to weakness; and because of this he must offer sacrifice for his own sins as well as for those of the people.

And one does not presume to take this honor, but takes it only when called by God, just as Aaron was. So also Christ did not glorify himself in becoming a high priest, but was appointed by the one who said to him, “You are my Son, today I have begotten you”; as he says also in another place, “You are a priest forever, according to the order of Melchizedek.”

In the days of his flesh, Jesus offered up prayers and supplications, with loud cries and tears, to the one who was able to save him from death, and he was heard because of his reverent submission. Although he was a Son, he learned obedience through what he suffered; and having been made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him, having been designated by God a high priest according to the order of Melchizedek.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Model of Obedience

Jesus learned through his sufferings to be obedient. When he was made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all those who obey him. [Hebrews 5: 8-9]

A little boy hated stewed prunes. Somehow he managed to eat all but two. His mother insisted that he eat these as well. He refused, so she sent him to bed, saying “God can’t stand disobedient boys; he gets very, very angry at them!”

That night a violent storm blew up. Lightning flashed and thunder crashed. The mother feared that her son would be frightened to death. So she went to his room to comfort him. She found him at the window, staring out into the storm and saying, “All that fuss over two prunes!”

What is my main motive for obeying God’s law—fear or love?  How strong is that motive?

I’ll go where you want me to go, dear Lord,
O’er mountain or plain or sea;
I’ll say what you want me to say, dear Lord,
I’ll be what you want me to be. 

—Mary Brown

—Excerpted from Action, by Fr. Mark Link, S.J. ©2000 RCL Enterprises, Inc., Allen TX. For more prayer resources from Fr. Link, please visit www.staygreat.com

Prayer

“He who remembers the presence of God is less open to other thoughts, especially bad thoughts.  As long as we believe that God sees us, we are restrained from daring to sin before such a Witness and Judge.  In two ways the presence of God is an antidote against sin:  First, because God sees us, and secondly because we see God.” — St. Ignatius of Loyola

Lord, ultimately all will be well.  Loss, suffering, and death will not have the final word.  For you are here and we are ready to do your will.  May the words of St. Ignatius of Loyola be alive in our attitudes and choices today.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!