May 31, 2013

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary 

Luke 1: 39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation.

He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.” And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Untying the Knots

Here is an anecdote from Pope Francis’ personal devotion to Mary that helps this feast of the Visitation come alive. While studying in Germany many years ago, then-Father Bergoglio found a painting which shows an image of “Mary who unties knots.”  In the painting Mary looks determined to untie a number of big and small knots in a ribbon that is handed to her by an angel. A second angel then returns to earth the now-untied ribbon.

Of this image, painted in 1700, Bergoglio wrote some years ago:  “All of us have knots in our hearts and all of us go through difficult times. Our good Lord who bestows grace on all his children wants us to have faith in Mary; he wants us to entrust to her the knots of our miseries which prevent us from reaching God, so that she can untie them and bring us closer to Jesus.”

This feast of Mary’s visitation to her cousin Elizabeth, you and I might pray over the “knots” of our own hearts.  Which of these can I entrust today to Mary’s grace and care?  In your prayer today, which of these “knots” do I invite her to untie?  Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death.  Amen.

The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Mother of the silence that preserves the mystery of God, deliver us from the idolatry of the present, to which those who forget are condemned. Purify the eyes of pastors with the balm of memory: that we might return to the freshness of the beginning, for a praying and penitent Church.

Mother of the beauty that blossoms from fidelity to daily work, remove us from the torpor of laziness, of pettiness, and defeatism. Cloak Pastors with that compassion that unifies and integrates: that we might discover the joy of a humble and fraternal servant Church.

Mother of the tenderness which enfolds in patience and mercy, help us burn away the sadness, impatience, and rigidity of those who have not known what it means to belong.
Intercede with your Son that our hands, our feet and our hearts may be swift: that we may build the Church with the truth in charity. Mother, we will be the People of God, on pilgrimage towards the Kingdom. Amen.

Pope Francis


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Prayer

Mother of the silence that preserves the mystery of God, deliver us from the idolatry of the present, to which those who forget are condemned. Purify the eyes of pastors with the balm of memory: that we might return to the freshness of the beginning, for a praying and penitent Church.

Mother of the beauty that blossoms from fidelity to daily work, remove us from the torpor of laziness, of pettiness, and defeatism. Cloak Pastors with that compassion that unifies and integrates: that we might discover the joy of a humble and fraternal servant Church.

Mother of the tenderness which enfolds in patience and mercy, help us burn away the sadness, impatience, and rigidity of those who have not known what it means to belong.
Intercede with your Son that our hands, our feet and our hearts may be swift: that we may build the Church with the truth in charity. Mother, we will be the People of God, on pilgrimage towards the Kingdom. Amen.

Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Untying the Knots

Here is an anecdote from Pope Francis’ personal devotion to Mary that helps this feast of the Visitation come alive. While studying in Germany many years ago, then-Father Bergoglio found a painting which shows an image of “Mary who unties knots.”  In the painting Mary looks determined to untie a number of big and small knots in a ribbon that is handed to her by an angel. A second angel then returns to earth the now-untied ribbon.

Of this image, painted in 1700, Bergoglio wrote some years ago:  “All of us have knots in our hearts and all of us go through difficult times. Our good Lord who bestows grace on all his children wants us to have faith in Mary; he wants us to entrust to her the knots of our miseries which prevent us from reaching God, so that she can untie them and bring us closer to Jesus.”

This feast of Mary’s visitation to her cousin Elizabeth, you and I might pray over the “knots” of our own hearts.  Which of these can I entrust today to Mary’s grace and care?  In your prayer today, which of these “knots” do I invite her to untie?  Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death.  Amen.

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Luke 1: 39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation.

He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.” And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


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Prayer

Lord, too often we silence ourselves when we should defend the good name of another Sometimes we become quiet and surrender our convictions to preserve harmony and spare ourselves the tension that conflict brings. With the persistence and enthusiasm of Bartimaeus let us not flinch before the truth.  And like Bartimaeus may we hear those assuring words: Take heart; get up, he is calling you.”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Enthusiasm for the Lord

Bartimaeus is a richly described character in Mark´s gospel.  We learn that he is a blind, roadside beggar who was unafraid to raise his voice when he learned that Jesus was passing by.  Though told to be quiet, he raises his voice yet again to get Jesus´ attention.  Finally, when he learns that he is being called, he “throws off” his cloak and “jumps” to his feet.

In Bartimaeus we see perseverance, a desire for healing, and maybe most importantly his enthusiasm. He does not want this moment to pass by.  His engagement with the present moment, with the reality that surrounds him, is passionate.

At the end of the story, Jesus tells him that it was his faith that saved him.  Given the actions of Bartimaeus in the story, we might say that it was his passion and enthusiasm that saved him.  Faith in this story has something to do with “throwing off our cloak” and “jumping to our feet”.

We might ask ourselves then: what makes me jump to my feet?  For whom or what do I throw off my cloak to meet or be with?

May the witness of Bartimaeus guide us.  May he help us jump to our feet to meet those who most need us today.

Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic teaching at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 30, 2013

Mark 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Enthusiasm for the Lord

Bartimaeus is a richly described character in Mark´s gospel.  We learn that he is a blind, roadside beggar who was unafraid to raise his voice when he learned that Jesus was passing by.  Though told to be quiet, he raises his voice yet again to get Jesus´ attention.  Finally, when he learns that he is being called, he “throws off” his cloak and “jumps” to his feet.

In Bartimaeus we see perseverance, a desire for healing, and maybe most importantly his enthusiasm. He does not want this moment to pass by.  His engagement with the present moment, with the reality that surrounds him, is passionate.

At the end of the story, Jesus tells him that it was his faith that saved him.  Given the actions of Bartimaeus in the story, we might say that it was his passion and enthusiasm that saved him.  Faith in this story has something to do with “throwing off our cloak” and “jumping to our feet”.

We might ask ourselves then: what makes me jump to my feet?  For whom or what do I throw off my cloak to meet or be with?

May the witness of Bartimaeus guide us.  May he help us jump to our feet to meet those who most need us today.

Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic teaching at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL

Prayer

Lord, too often we silence ourselves when we should defend the good name of another Sometimes we become quiet and surrender our convictions to preserve harmony and spare ourselves the tension that conflict brings. With the persistence and enthusiasm of Bartimaeus let us not flinch before the truth.  And like Bartimaeus may we hear those assuring words: Take heart; get up, he is calling you.”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 29, 2013

Mark 10: 32-45

They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was to happen to him, saying, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles; they will mock him, and spit upon him, and flog him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking.

Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

God’s People — That’s Us!

In today’s reading from the Book of Sirach we hear a prayer for God’s people. Have you ever played the game of describing yourself without referring to what you do? This game forces us to reflect on our most fundamental identity. All too often, we think about how we are different from one another…Christian, Jew or Muslim; rich or poor; educated or uneducated; conservative or liberal; right or wrong.

Today’s reading reminds us that our most fundamental identity is that we are children of God. We are God’s people! God creates each and every one of us from and for his infinite, absolute and unconditional love. He calls us to live and share this love with every person he puts in our lives. Be alert today for the people God puts in your life and share with them God’s love.  Make a special effort to share with those who are different and in most need of love.

David McNulty is the Provincial Assistant for Advancement, Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits

Prayer

Lord, we search for that which will brings us true success. We seek for our families that which will bring them enduring fulfillment. You have given us the pathway to such joy.  “Whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all” Today may our decisions and the ways we spend our time follow your call to greatness.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


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Prayer

Lord, we search for that which will brings us true success. We seek for our families that which will bring them enduring fulfillment. You have given us the pathway to such joy.  “Whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all” Today may our decisions and the ways we spend our time follow your call to greatness.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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May 31, 2013

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary 

Luke 1: 39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation.

He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.” And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Untying the Knots

Here is an anecdote from Pope Francis’ personal devotion to Mary that helps this feast of the Visitation come alive. While studying in Germany many years ago, then-Father Bergoglio found a painting which shows an image of “Mary who unties knots.”  In the painting Mary looks determined to untie a number of big and small knots in a ribbon that is handed to her by an angel. A second angel then returns to earth the now-untied ribbon.

Of this image, painted in 1700, Bergoglio wrote some years ago:  “All of us have knots in our hearts and all of us go through difficult times. Our good Lord who bestows grace on all his children wants us to have faith in Mary; he wants us to entrust to her the knots of our miseries which prevent us from reaching God, so that she can untie them and bring us closer to Jesus.”

This feast of Mary’s visitation to her cousin Elizabeth, you and I might pray over the “knots” of our own hearts.  Which of these can I entrust today to Mary’s grace and care?  In your prayer today, which of these “knots” do I invite her to untie?  Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death.  Amen.

The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Mother of the silence that preserves the mystery of God, deliver us from the idolatry of the present, to which those who forget are condemned. Purify the eyes of pastors with the balm of memory: that we might return to the freshness of the beginning, for a praying and penitent Church.

Mother of the beauty that blossoms from fidelity to daily work, remove us from the torpor of laziness, of pettiness, and defeatism. Cloak Pastors with that compassion that unifies and integrates: that we might discover the joy of a humble and fraternal servant Church.

Mother of the tenderness which enfolds in patience and mercy, help us burn away the sadness, impatience, and rigidity of those who have not known what it means to belong.
Intercede with your Son that our hands, our feet and our hearts may be swift: that we may build the Church with the truth in charity. Mother, we will be the People of God, on pilgrimage towards the Kingdom. Amen.

Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Mother of the silence that preserves the mystery of God, deliver us from the idolatry of the present, to which those who forget are condemned. Purify the eyes of pastors with the balm of memory: that we might return to the freshness of the beginning, for a praying and penitent Church.

Mother of the beauty that blossoms from fidelity to daily work, remove us from the torpor of laziness, of pettiness, and defeatism. Cloak Pastors with that compassion that unifies and integrates: that we might discover the joy of a humble and fraternal servant Church.

Mother of the tenderness which enfolds in patience and mercy, help us burn away the sadness, impatience, and rigidity of those who have not known what it means to belong.
Intercede with your Son that our hands, our feet and our hearts may be swift: that we may build the Church with the truth in charity. Mother, we will be the People of God, on pilgrimage towards the Kingdom. Amen.

Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Untying the Knots

Here is an anecdote from Pope Francis’ personal devotion to Mary that helps this feast of the Visitation come alive. While studying in Germany many years ago, then-Father Bergoglio found a painting which shows an image of “Mary who unties knots.”  In the painting Mary looks determined to untie a number of big and small knots in a ribbon that is handed to her by an angel. A second angel then returns to earth the now-untied ribbon.

Of this image, painted in 1700, Bergoglio wrote some years ago:  “All of us have knots in our hearts and all of us go through difficult times. Our good Lord who bestows grace on all his children wants us to have faith in Mary; he wants us to entrust to her the knots of our miseries which prevent us from reaching God, so that she can untie them and bring us closer to Jesus.”

This feast of Mary’s visitation to her cousin Elizabeth, you and I might pray over the “knots” of our own hearts.  Which of these can I entrust today to Mary’s grace and care?  In your prayer today, which of these “knots” do I invite her to untie?  Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death.  Amen.

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Luke 1: 39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation.

He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.” And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, too often we silence ourselves when we should defend the good name of another Sometimes we become quiet and surrender our convictions to preserve harmony and spare ourselves the tension that conflict brings. With the persistence and enthusiasm of Bartimaeus let us not flinch before the truth.  And like Bartimaeus may we hear those assuring words: Take heart; get up, he is calling you.”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Enthusiasm for the Lord

Bartimaeus is a richly described character in Mark´s gospel.  We learn that he is a blind, roadside beggar who was unafraid to raise his voice when he learned that Jesus was passing by.  Though told to be quiet, he raises his voice yet again to get Jesus´ attention.  Finally, when he learns that he is being called, he “throws off” his cloak and “jumps” to his feet.

In Bartimaeus we see perseverance, a desire for healing, and maybe most importantly his enthusiasm. He does not want this moment to pass by.  His engagement with the present moment, with the reality that surrounds him, is passionate.

At the end of the story, Jesus tells him that it was his faith that saved him.  Given the actions of Bartimaeus in the story, we might say that it was his passion and enthusiasm that saved him.  Faith in this story has something to do with “throwing off our cloak” and “jumping to our feet”.

We might ask ourselves then: what makes me jump to my feet?  For whom or what do I throw off my cloak to meet or be with?

May the witness of Bartimaeus guide us.  May he help us jump to our feet to meet those who most need us today.

Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic teaching at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 30, 2013

Mark 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Enthusiasm for the Lord

Bartimaeus is a richly described character in Mark´s gospel.  We learn that he is a blind, roadside beggar who was unafraid to raise his voice when he learned that Jesus was passing by.  Though told to be quiet, he raises his voice yet again to get Jesus´ attention.  Finally, when he learns that he is being called, he “throws off” his cloak and “jumps” to his feet.

In Bartimaeus we see perseverance, a desire for healing, and maybe most importantly his enthusiasm. He does not want this moment to pass by.  His engagement with the present moment, with the reality that surrounds him, is passionate.

At the end of the story, Jesus tells him that it was his faith that saved him.  Given the actions of Bartimaeus in the story, we might say that it was his passion and enthusiasm that saved him.  Faith in this story has something to do with “throwing off our cloak” and “jumping to our feet”.

We might ask ourselves then: what makes me jump to my feet?  For whom or what do I throw off my cloak to meet or be with?

May the witness of Bartimaeus guide us.  May he help us jump to our feet to meet those who most need us today.

Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic teaching at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL

Prayer

Lord, too often we silence ourselves when we should defend the good name of another Sometimes we become quiet and surrender our convictions to preserve harmony and spare ourselves the tension that conflict brings. With the persistence and enthusiasm of Bartimaeus let us not flinch before the truth.  And like Bartimaeus may we hear those assuring words: Take heart; get up, he is calling you.”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 29, 2013

Mark 10: 32-45

They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was to happen to him, saying, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles; they will mock him, and spit upon him, and flog him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking.

Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

God’s People — That’s Us!

In today’s reading from the Book of Sirach we hear a prayer for God’s people. Have you ever played the game of describing yourself without referring to what you do? This game forces us to reflect on our most fundamental identity. All too often, we think about how we are different from one another…Christian, Jew or Muslim; rich or poor; educated or uneducated; conservative or liberal; right or wrong.

Today’s reading reminds us that our most fundamental identity is that we are children of God. We are God’s people! God creates each and every one of us from and for his infinite, absolute and unconditional love. He calls us to live and share this love with every person he puts in our lives. Be alert today for the people God puts in your life and share with them God’s love.  Make a special effort to share with those who are different and in most need of love.

David McNulty is the Provincial Assistant for Advancement, Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits

Prayer

Lord, we search for that which will brings us true success. We seek for our families that which will bring them enduring fulfillment. You have given us the pathway to such joy.  “Whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all” Today may our decisions and the ways we spend our time follow your call to greatness.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, we search for that which will brings us true success. We seek for our families that which will bring them enduring fulfillment. You have given us the pathway to such joy.  “Whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all” Today may our decisions and the ways we spend our time follow your call to greatness.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!