Prayer

Lord, strengthen our resolve to follow when the way is hazy and our footsteps are not secure. Strengthen our understanding and acceptance that revelation is a process of discovering, choosing, and following you wherever we are in our day, in our life. And should we struggle with taking that first step, assure us that we need but move forward one step at a time in response to your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Decision-making with the Lord

In both the first reading and the gospel,  we see invitations to follow.  Whereas, when Elisha asks to first bid farewell to his parents and Elijah gives a fast retort but then agrees,  Jesus’ response to such incidents of choice is much stronger.  Thus, in today’s passage from Luke, Jesus says: “No one who sets a hand to the plow and looks to what was left behind is fit for the kingdom of God.”

In the second reading, Paul instructs the Galatians: “For freedom Christ set us free …” and …“serve one another through love.” With these words of Scripture in mind, we call upon the Holy Spirit and ponder:

-What means did the Holy Spirit use to let you know the path Jesus wanted you to take to follow Him?  

-Are there things in your life—prior to your

“Follow Me” call— which still block your freedom to totally embrace the call of Jesus? 

-If yes, what strategies will you take to address this lack of freedom? 

—Fr. Tim Shepard, S.J. is a pastoral minister, librarian, and retreat director living at

Colombiere, the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit retirement center in Clarkston MI.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 9: 51-62

When the days drew near for him to be taken up, he set his face to go to Jerusalem. And he sent messengers ahead of him. On their way they entered a village of the Samaritans to make ready for him; but they did not receive him, because his face was set toward Jerusalem. When his disciples James and John saw it, they said, “Lord, do you want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them?” But he turned and rebuked them. Then they went on to another village.

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 30, 2013

Luke 9: 51-62

When the days drew near for him to be taken up, he set his face to go to Jerusalem. And he sent messengers ahead of him. On their way they entered a village of the Samaritans to make ready for him; but they did not receive him, because his face was set toward Jerusalem. When his disciples James and John saw it, they said, “Lord, do you want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them?” But he turned and rebuked them. Then they went on to another village.

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Decision-making with the Lord

In both the first reading and the gospel,  we see invitations to follow.  Whereas, when Elisha asks to first bid farewell to his parents and Elijah gives a fast retort but then agrees,  Jesus’ response to such incidents of choice is much stronger.  Thus, in today’s passage from Luke, Jesus says: “No one who sets a hand to the plow and looks to what was left behind is fit for the kingdom of God.”

In the second reading, Paul instructs the Galatians: “For freedom Christ set us free …” and …“serve one another through love.” With these words of Scripture in mind, we call upon the Holy Spirit and ponder:

-What means did the Holy Spirit use to let you know the path Jesus wanted you to take to follow Him?  

-Are there things in your life—prior to your

“Follow Me” call— which still block your freedom to totally embrace the call of Jesus? 

-If yes, what strategies will you take to address this lack of freedom? 

—Fr. Tim Shepard, S.J. is a pastoral minister, librarian, and retreat director living at

Colombiere, the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit retirement center in Clarkston MI.

Prayer

Lord, strengthen our resolve to follow when the way is hazy and our footsteps are not secure. Strengthen our understanding and acceptance that revelation is a process of discovering, choosing, and following you wherever we are in our day, in our life. And should we struggle with taking that first step, assure us that we need but move forward one step at a time in response to your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord in your great plan, every detail is important,  even the hidden witness of those who live their faith with simplicity in everyday family relationships, work relationships, friendships.  Give us the grace to remember that we cannot proclaim the Gospel of Jesus without the tangible witness of our life.  And Lord, strengthen our desire to empty ourselves of our many small or great idols in which we take refuge, or which form the base of our security.

Adapted from Pope Francis’ Homily, April 4, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Life’s Ultimate Question

The missionary tradition of the Church began with the faith-filled witness to Jesus by his apostles and early followers.  Among these the Church gives primacy of place to St. Peter and St. Paul.  Today’s first two readings from Acts and 1 Timothy give us insight into the character and witness of these faith-filled apostles.  Both preached Jesus Christ as Messiah and Lord no matter the risk, and both were martyred in Rome.

Following in their footsteps may seem to be a formidable and even foolhardy challenge.  Jesus’ question to Peter offers an approach.  Jesus asks Peter –and each of us—“Who do you say that I am?”  Our concrete day-by-day answer over the span of our lives to that simple question will mark our own journey of faith.  Our heartfelt response to throw in our lot with this Jesus of Nazareth – especially, as Pope Francis reminds us, in our outreach to the poor — will give us “the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.”

How today do I offer a personal response to Jesus’ question:  “Who do you say that I am?”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 29, 2013

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Life’s Ultimate Question

The missionary tradition of the Church began with the faith-filled witness to Jesus by his apostles and early followers.  Among these the Church gives primacy of place to St. Peter and St. Paul.  Today’s first two readings from Acts and 1 Timothy give us insight into the character and witness of these faith-filled apostles.  Both preached Jesus Christ as Messiah and Lord no matter the risk, and both were martyred in Rome.

Following in their footsteps may seem to be a formidable and even foolhardy challenge.  Jesus’ question to Peter offers an approach.  Jesus asks Peter –and each of us—“Who do you say that I am?”  Our concrete day-by-day answer over the span of our lives to that simple question will mark our own journey of faith.  Our heartfelt response to throw in our lot with this Jesus of Nazareth – especially, as Pope Francis reminds us, in our outreach to the poor — will give us “the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.”

How today do I offer a personal response to Jesus’ question:  “Who do you say that I am?”

The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord in your great plan, every detail is important,  even the hidden witness of those who live their faith with simplicity in everyday family relationships, work relationships, friendships.  Give us the grace to remember that we cannot proclaim the Gospel of Jesus without the tangible witness of our life.  And Lord, strengthen our desire to empty ourselves of our many small or great idols in which we take refuge, or which form the base of our security.

Adapted from Pope Francis’ Homily, April 4, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we allow the day to day expectations to overwhelm us and to steal our laughter and happiness.  We forget to acknowledge the many gifts and opportunities that fill up our lives.  This day will be different. We pray for perspective and for balance.  And then we can give witness to St. Irenaeus proclamation, “God’s glory is man fully alive.”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Living Fully Alive!

St. Irenaeus may seem an ancient bishop and martyr, except for his wonderful phrase that is ever new:  God’s glory is man fully alive.  Part of a larger instruction on dealing with the heresies of the late 2nd century, this maxim goes right to the heart of living our faith amidst life’s daily successes and struggles.

Irenaeus’ quote was a favorite of Pope John Paul II.  He used it at two World Youth Days as an invitation to young people to develop their God-given talents fully and to place them at the service of the gospel and those in need.   John Paul urged a generous heart and a faith-filled spirit, especially in the face of very real 20th century heresies.

For me, when do I find myself “fully alive”?  How does my heart expand as I use my gifts and talents as Jesus invites in the gospel?  What practical difference can I make in living the Lord’s gospel…just this weekend?

–The  Jesuit  Prayer  Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

Lord, strengthen our resolve to follow when the way is hazy and our footsteps are not secure. Strengthen our understanding and acceptance that revelation is a process of discovering, choosing, and following you wherever we are in our day, in our life. And should we struggle with taking that first step, assure us that we need but move forward one step at a time in response to your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Decision-making with the Lord

In both the first reading and the gospel,  we see invitations to follow.  Whereas, when Elisha asks to first bid farewell to his parents and Elijah gives a fast retort but then agrees,  Jesus’ response to such incidents of choice is much stronger.  Thus, in today’s passage from Luke, Jesus says: “No one who sets a hand to the plow and looks to what was left behind is fit for the kingdom of God.”

In the second reading, Paul instructs the Galatians: “For freedom Christ set us free …” and …“serve one another through love.” With these words of Scripture in mind, we call upon the Holy Spirit and ponder:

-What means did the Holy Spirit use to let you know the path Jesus wanted you to take to follow Him?  

-Are there things in your life—prior to your

“Follow Me” call— which still block your freedom to totally embrace the call of Jesus? 

-If yes, what strategies will you take to address this lack of freedom? 

—Fr. Tim Shepard, S.J. is a pastoral minister, librarian, and retreat director living at

Colombiere, the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit retirement center in Clarkston MI.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 9: 51-62

When the days drew near for him to be taken up, he set his face to go to Jerusalem. And he sent messengers ahead of him. On their way they entered a village of the Samaritans to make ready for him; but they did not receive him, because his face was set toward Jerusalem. When his disciples James and John saw it, they said, “Lord, do you want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them?” But he turned and rebuked them. Then they went on to another village.

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 30, 2013

Luke 9: 51-62

When the days drew near for him to be taken up, he set his face to go to Jerusalem. And he sent messengers ahead of him. On their way they entered a village of the Samaritans to make ready for him; but they did not receive him, because his face was set toward Jerusalem. When his disciples James and John saw it, they said, “Lord, do you want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them?” But he turned and rebuked them. Then they went on to another village.

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Decision-making with the Lord

In both the first reading and the gospel,  we see invitations to follow.  Whereas, when Elisha asks to first bid farewell to his parents and Elijah gives a fast retort but then agrees,  Jesus’ response to such incidents of choice is much stronger.  Thus, in today’s passage from Luke, Jesus says: “No one who sets a hand to the plow and looks to what was left behind is fit for the kingdom of God.”

In the second reading, Paul instructs the Galatians: “For freedom Christ set us free …” and …“serve one another through love.” With these words of Scripture in mind, we call upon the Holy Spirit and ponder:

-What means did the Holy Spirit use to let you know the path Jesus wanted you to take to follow Him?  

-Are there things in your life—prior to your

“Follow Me” call— which still block your freedom to totally embrace the call of Jesus? 

-If yes, what strategies will you take to address this lack of freedom? 

—Fr. Tim Shepard, S.J. is a pastoral minister, librarian, and retreat director living at

Colombiere, the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit retirement center in Clarkston MI.

Prayer

Lord, strengthen our resolve to follow when the way is hazy and our footsteps are not secure. Strengthen our understanding and acceptance that revelation is a process of discovering, choosing, and following you wherever we are in our day, in our life. And should we struggle with taking that first step, assure us that we need but move forward one step at a time in response to your call.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord in your great plan, every detail is important,  even the hidden witness of those who live their faith with simplicity in everyday family relationships, work relationships, friendships.  Give us the grace to remember that we cannot proclaim the Gospel of Jesus without the tangible witness of our life.  And Lord, strengthen our desire to empty ourselves of our many small or great idols in which we take refuge, or which form the base of our security.

Adapted from Pope Francis’ Homily, April 4, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Life’s Ultimate Question

The missionary tradition of the Church began with the faith-filled witness to Jesus by his apostles and early followers.  Among these the Church gives primacy of place to St. Peter and St. Paul.  Today’s first two readings from Acts and 1 Timothy give us insight into the character and witness of these faith-filled apostles.  Both preached Jesus Christ as Messiah and Lord no matter the risk, and both were martyred in Rome.

Following in their footsteps may seem to be a formidable and even foolhardy challenge.  Jesus’ question to Peter offers an approach.  Jesus asks Peter –and each of us—“Who do you say that I am?”  Our concrete day-by-day answer over the span of our lives to that simple question will mark our own journey of faith.  Our heartfelt response to throw in our lot with this Jesus of Nazareth – especially, as Pope Francis reminds us, in our outreach to the poor — will give us “the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.”

How today do I offer a personal response to Jesus’ question:  “Who do you say that I am?”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 29, 2013

Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Life’s Ultimate Question

The missionary tradition of the Church began with the faith-filled witness to Jesus by his apostles and early followers.  Among these the Church gives primacy of place to St. Peter and St. Paul.  Today’s first two readings from Acts and 1 Timothy give us insight into the character and witness of these faith-filled apostles.  Both preached Jesus Christ as Messiah and Lord no matter the risk, and both were martyred in Rome.

Following in their footsteps may seem to be a formidable and even foolhardy challenge.  Jesus’ question to Peter offers an approach.  Jesus asks Peter –and each of us—“Who do you say that I am?”  Our concrete day-by-day answer over the span of our lives to that simple question will mark our own journey of faith.  Our heartfelt response to throw in our lot with this Jesus of Nazareth – especially, as Pope Francis reminds us, in our outreach to the poor — will give us “the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.”

How today do I offer a personal response to Jesus’ question:  “Who do you say that I am?”

The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord in your great plan, every detail is important,  even the hidden witness of those who live their faith with simplicity in everyday family relationships, work relationships, friendships.  Give us the grace to remember that we cannot proclaim the Gospel of Jesus without the tangible witness of our life.  And Lord, strengthen our desire to empty ourselves of our many small or great idols in which we take refuge, or which form the base of our security.

Adapted from Pope Francis’ Homily, April 4, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, sometimes we allow the day to day expectations to overwhelm us and to steal our laughter and happiness.  We forget to acknowledge the many gifts and opportunities that fill up our lives.  This day will be different. We pray for perspective and for balance.  And then we can give witness to St. Irenaeus proclamation, “God’s glory is man fully alive.”

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Living Fully Alive!

St. Irenaeus may seem an ancient bishop and martyr, except for his wonderful phrase that is ever new:  God’s glory is man fully alive.  Part of a larger instruction on dealing with the heresies of the late 2nd century, this maxim goes right to the heart of living our faith amidst life’s daily successes and struggles.

Irenaeus’ quote was a favorite of Pope John Paul II.  He used it at two World Youth Days as an invitation to young people to develop their God-given talents fully and to place them at the service of the gospel and those in need.   John Paul urged a generous heart and a faith-filled spirit, especially in the face of very real 20th century heresies.

For me, when do I find myself “fully alive”?  How does my heart expand as I use my gifts and talents as Jesus invites in the gospel?  What practical difference can I make in living the Lord’s gospel…just this weekend?

–The  Jesuit  Prayer  Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!