Prayer

Lord, where do you send us to bring your love and mercy to others? There are no borders, no limits: you send us to everyone. Grant us the grace to remember that your love is not only for those who seem close to us, more receptive, more welcoming. It is for everyone.  Help us not to be afraid to go and to bring the Gospel into every area of life, to the fringes of society, even to those who seem farthest away, most indifferent. You seek all, and you want everyone to feel the warmth of your mercy and love.

—Pope Francis, adapted from World Youth Day Homily, July 28, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Embracing the World

How many of you still celebrate feast days? They’re not unlike birthdays; they come around once a year, always on the same date and help us to remember who we’re named for. I can’t imagine a “surprise feast-day party” or singing “Happy Feast Day to you . . .” but they do mark major milestones and can be the occasion of a good party. Today we celebrate the 447th anniversary of the day Ignatius Loyola died. When one is declared a saint, the Church generally chooses the date of death to remember so holy a life.

While this is a big day for Jesuits, millions of people celebrate it throughout the world. So many lives have been touched by the legacy of Saint Ignatius and they take comfort in remembering him this day. This July 31 marks yet another milestone; today Jesuits in Rome will celebrate Mass with the first Jesuit Pope at the Church of the Gesu beside the tomb of Saint Ignatius. I doubt that Saint Ignatius ever imagined such a scene in his lifetime, but with God all things are possible.

This year I take great comfort in the words of Pope Francis who shares his Jesuit vocation with the universal Church. This past week on the famed Copacabana beach in Brazil, Pope Francis encouraged young people “to get in shape.” But he wasn’t talking about their bodies, he was talking about their prayer life. He said, “By talking to Jesus in prayer, we can face every situation in life undaunted.” Saint Ignatius Loyola loved the world, and he never wanted us to be afraid of it. Let’s use this day to embrace this world that Ignatius loved so much, and may our own prayer with Jesus replace our fear with hope.

Fr. Timothy Kesicki, SJ, Provincial of the Chicago-Detroit Province


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits

Matthew 13: 44-46

The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which someone found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field. Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 31, 2013

St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits

Matthew 13: 44-46

The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which someone found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field. Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Embracing the World

How many of you still celebrate feast days? They’re not unlike birthdays; they come around once a year, always on the same date and help us to remember who we’re named for. I can’t imagine a “surprise feast-day party” or singing “Happy Feast Day to you . . .” but they do mark major milestones and can be the occasion of a good party. Today we celebrate the 447th anniversary of the day Ignatius Loyola died. When one is declared a saint, the Church generally chooses the date of death to remember so holy a life.

While this is a big day for Jesuits, millions of people celebrate it throughout the world. So many lives have been touched by the legacy of Saint Ignatius and they take comfort in remembering him this day. This July 31 marks yet another milestone; today Jesuits in Rome will celebrate Mass with the first Jesuit Pope at the Church of the Gesu beside the tomb of Saint Ignatius. I doubt that Saint Ignatius ever imagined such a scene in his lifetime, but with God all things are possible.

This year I take great comfort in the words of Pope Francis who shares his Jesuit vocation with the universal Church. This past week on the famed Copacabana beach in Brazil, Pope Francis encouraged young people “to get in shape.” But he wasn’t talking about their bodies, he was talking about their prayer life. He said, “By talking to Jesus in prayer, we can face every situation in life undaunted.” Saint Ignatius Loyola loved the world, and he never wanted us to be afraid of it. Let’s use this day to embrace this world that Ignatius loved so much, and may our own prayer with Jesus replace our fear with hope.

Fr. Timothy Kesicki, SJ, Provincial of the Chicago-Detroit Province

Prayer

Lord, where do you send us to bring your love and mercy to others? There are no borders, no limits: you send us to everyone. Grant us the grace to remember that your love is not only for those who seem close to us, more receptive, more welcoming. It is for everyone.  Help us not to be afraid to go and to bring the Gospel into every area of life, to the fringes of society, even to those who seem farthest away, most indifferent. You seek all, and you want everyone to feel the warmth of your mercy and love.

—Pope Francis, adapted from World Youth Day Homily, July 28, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, we believe that we are here
not here by chance, but by your choosing. Your
hand formed us and made us the people we are.
You compare us to no one else —
we are one of a kind. We lack nothing  your grace
can’t give us. You have allowed us to be here at
this time in history to fulfill your special purpose
for this generation.

Roy Lessin, author of Christian daily devotions


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Active Service

This year’s World Youth Day, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil closed on Sunday with Mass celebrated by Pope Francis with nearly 3 million young pilgrims at Campus Fidei.  This gathering site became a gigantic meeting tent where the Holy Father invited all present to lives of prayer and simplicity, leadership and active service –service especially of the poor and those on the margins of society.

Moses’ words in today’s reading from Exodus were certainly echoed on Sunday in Brazil:  “The Lord, a merciful and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity, continuing his kindness for a thousand generations.”  Surely those present formed one of those “thousand generations” Moses was speaking about.

The challenge of any large spiritual gathering—especially one as moving as WYD—is to translate the spiritual energy and personal enthusiasm into daily practice.  For all of us in the shadow of this global faith event today’s gospel offers a cue.  How is that in an ongoing way we harvest the good seed from this event into the routine of our daily living?  “Whoever has ears ought to hear,”  Jesus exclaims.  What have I heard and seen recently that moves me to gather in even a small part of this spiritual harvest … just today?!

Dear Young People:  do not bury your talents, the gifts that God has given you!  Do not be afraid to dream of great things.  The Holy Spirit truly transforms us.  With our cooperation, he also wants to transform the world we live in.          

Pope Francis

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Matthew 13: 36-43

Then he left the crowds and went into the house. And his disciples approached him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds of the field.” He answered, “The one who sows the good seed is the Son of Man; the field is the world, and the good seed are the children of the kingdom; the weeds are the children of the evil one, and the enemy who sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the age, and the reapers are angels.

Just as the weeds are collected and burned up with fire, so will it be at the end of the age. The Son of Man will send his angels, and they will collect out of his kingdom all causes of sin and all evildoers, and they will throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Let anyone with ears listen!

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 30, 2013

Matthew 13: 36-43

Then he left the crowds and went into the house. And his disciples approached him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds of the field.” He answered, “The one who sows the good seed is the Son of Man; the field is the world, and the good seed are the children of the kingdom; the weeds are the children of the evil one, and the enemy who sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the age, and the reapers are angels.

Just as the weeds are collected and burned up with fire, so will it be at the end of the age. The Son of Man will send his angels, and they will collect out of his kingdom all causes of sin and all evildoers, and they will throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Let anyone with ears listen!

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Active Service

This year’s World Youth Day, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil closed on Sunday with Mass celebrated by Pope Francis with nearly 3 million young pilgrims at Campus Fidei.  This gathering site became a gigantic meeting tent where the Holy Father invited all present to lives of prayer and simplicity, leadership and active service –service especially of the poor and those on the margins of society.

Moses’ words in today’s reading from Exodus were certainly echoed on Sunday in Brazil:  “The Lord, a merciful and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity, continuing his kindness for a thousand generations.”  Surely those present formed one of those “thousand generations” Moses was speaking about.

The challenge of any large spiritual gathering—especially one as moving as WYD—is to translate the spiritual energy and personal enthusiasm into daily practice.  For all of us in the shadow of this global faith event today’s gospel offers a cue.  How is that in an ongoing way we harvest the good seed from this event into the routine of our daily living?  “Whoever has ears ought to hear,”  Jesus exclaims.  What have I heard and seen recently that moves me to gather in even a small part of this spiritual harvest … just today?!

Dear Young People:  do not bury your talents, the gifts that God has given you!  Do not be afraid to dream of great things.  The Holy Spirit truly transforms us.  With our cooperation, he also wants to transform the world we live in.          

Pope Francis

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord, we believe that we are here
not here by chance, but by your choosing. Your
hand formed us and made us the people we are.
You compare us to no one else —
we are one of a kind. We lack nothing  your grace
can’t give us. You have allowed us to be here at
this time in history to fulfill your special purpose
for this generation.

Roy Lessin, author of Christian daily devotions


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord Jesus, teach me to be generous;
teach me to serve you
as you deserve,
to give and not to count the cost,
to fight and not to heed the wounds,
to toil and not to seek for rest,
to labor and not to seek reward,
except that of knowing that
I do your will.
Amen.

—St. Ignatius of Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The “Both / And” of Daily Living

This is the memorial feast day for St. Martha.  She is one of my favorite and personally familiar women in the bible.  I oftentimes feel like the Martha described in this Gospel narrative:  that it is all up to me; that the more I accomplish the better I am as a person; that I will be recognized and appreciated for the hard work that I do.  Yeah, right!

It is often easy to play off Mary’s way as better than Martha’s.  In reality, both personal aspects of Mary and Martha are a part of my own sense of self.  There is always the interplay of both of these within me:  the contemplative, quiet and mindful Mary…along with the active, energetic and productive Martha.  A visual example of this reality is found in the familiar ying-yang symbol.

An essential invitation in Ignatian Spirituality is to become a “contemplative in action.”  Since both realities are essential aspects of our nature, they are thus essential aspects of a fruitful spiritual relationship with God.  One is not better than the other, but the balance of both is essential for effective daily living.

We fulfill our Christian vocations and live more meaningful lives when we both contemplatively welcome and receive God’s presence in our own lives, and actively express God’s love and forgiveness in word and action with our neighbors.  Faith is both contemplative and active, inward and outward, personal and communal.

How am I attentive to both the contemplative and active side of living and expressing my Christian vocation?  

—Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. is minister of the Loyola University Jesuit Community, Chicago, and also serves on the vocations staff for the Chicago-Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

Lord, where do you send us to bring your love and mercy to others? There are no borders, no limits: you send us to everyone. Grant us the grace to remember that your love is not only for those who seem close to us, more receptive, more welcoming. It is for everyone.  Help us not to be afraid to go and to bring the Gospel into every area of life, to the fringes of society, even to those who seem farthest away, most indifferent. You seek all, and you want everyone to feel the warmth of your mercy and love.

—Pope Francis, adapted from World Youth Day Homily, July 28, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Embracing the World

How many of you still celebrate feast days? They’re not unlike birthdays; they come around once a year, always on the same date and help us to remember who we’re named for. I can’t imagine a “surprise feast-day party” or singing “Happy Feast Day to you . . .” but they do mark major milestones and can be the occasion of a good party. Today we celebrate the 447th anniversary of the day Ignatius Loyola died. When one is declared a saint, the Church generally chooses the date of death to remember so holy a life.

While this is a big day for Jesuits, millions of people celebrate it throughout the world. So many lives have been touched by the legacy of Saint Ignatius and they take comfort in remembering him this day. This July 31 marks yet another milestone; today Jesuits in Rome will celebrate Mass with the first Jesuit Pope at the Church of the Gesu beside the tomb of Saint Ignatius. I doubt that Saint Ignatius ever imagined such a scene in his lifetime, but with God all things are possible.

This year I take great comfort in the words of Pope Francis who shares his Jesuit vocation with the universal Church. This past week on the famed Copacabana beach in Brazil, Pope Francis encouraged young people “to get in shape.” But he wasn’t talking about their bodies, he was talking about their prayer life. He said, “By talking to Jesus in prayer, we can face every situation in life undaunted.” Saint Ignatius Loyola loved the world, and he never wanted us to be afraid of it. Let’s use this day to embrace this world that Ignatius loved so much, and may our own prayer with Jesus replace our fear with hope.

Fr. Timothy Kesicki, SJ, Provincial of the Chicago-Detroit Province


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits

Matthew 13: 44-46

The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which someone found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field. Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 31, 2013

St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits

Matthew 13: 44-46

The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which someone found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field. Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Embracing the World

How many of you still celebrate feast days? They’re not unlike birthdays; they come around once a year, always on the same date and help us to remember who we’re named for. I can’t imagine a “surprise feast-day party” or singing “Happy Feast Day to you . . .” but they do mark major milestones and can be the occasion of a good party. Today we celebrate the 447th anniversary of the day Ignatius Loyola died. When one is declared a saint, the Church generally chooses the date of death to remember so holy a life.

While this is a big day for Jesuits, millions of people celebrate it throughout the world. So many lives have been touched by the legacy of Saint Ignatius and they take comfort in remembering him this day. This July 31 marks yet another milestone; today Jesuits in Rome will celebrate Mass with the first Jesuit Pope at the Church of the Gesu beside the tomb of Saint Ignatius. I doubt that Saint Ignatius ever imagined such a scene in his lifetime, but with God all things are possible.

This year I take great comfort in the words of Pope Francis who shares his Jesuit vocation with the universal Church. This past week on the famed Copacabana beach in Brazil, Pope Francis encouraged young people “to get in shape.” But he wasn’t talking about their bodies, he was talking about their prayer life. He said, “By talking to Jesus in prayer, we can face every situation in life undaunted.” Saint Ignatius Loyola loved the world, and he never wanted us to be afraid of it. Let’s use this day to embrace this world that Ignatius loved so much, and may our own prayer with Jesus replace our fear with hope.

Fr. Timothy Kesicki, SJ, Provincial of the Chicago-Detroit Province

Prayer

Lord, where do you send us to bring your love and mercy to others? There are no borders, no limits: you send us to everyone. Grant us the grace to remember that your love is not only for those who seem close to us, more receptive, more welcoming. It is for everyone.  Help us not to be afraid to go and to bring the Gospel into every area of life, to the fringes of society, even to those who seem farthest away, most indifferent. You seek all, and you want everyone to feel the warmth of your mercy and love.

—Pope Francis, adapted from World Youth Day Homily, July 28, 2013


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, we believe that we are here
not here by chance, but by your choosing. Your
hand formed us and made us the people we are.
You compare us to no one else —
we are one of a kind. We lack nothing  your grace
can’t give us. You have allowed us to be here at
this time in history to fulfill your special purpose
for this generation.

Roy Lessin, author of Christian daily devotions


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Active Service

This year’s World Youth Day, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil closed on Sunday with Mass celebrated by Pope Francis with nearly 3 million young pilgrims at Campus Fidei.  This gathering site became a gigantic meeting tent where the Holy Father invited all present to lives of prayer and simplicity, leadership and active service –service especially of the poor and those on the margins of society.

Moses’ words in today’s reading from Exodus were certainly echoed on Sunday in Brazil:  “The Lord, a merciful and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity, continuing his kindness for a thousand generations.”  Surely those present formed one of those “thousand generations” Moses was speaking about.

The challenge of any large spiritual gathering—especially one as moving as WYD—is to translate the spiritual energy and personal enthusiasm into daily practice.  For all of us in the shadow of this global faith event today’s gospel offers a cue.  How is that in an ongoing way we harvest the good seed from this event into the routine of our daily living?  “Whoever has ears ought to hear,”  Jesus exclaims.  What have I heard and seen recently that moves me to gather in even a small part of this spiritual harvest … just today?!

Dear Young People:  do not bury your talents, the gifts that God has given you!  Do not be afraid to dream of great things.  The Holy Spirit truly transforms us.  With our cooperation, he also wants to transform the world we live in.          

Pope Francis

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Matthew 13: 36-43

Then he left the crowds and went into the house. And his disciples approached him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds of the field.” He answered, “The one who sows the good seed is the Son of Man; the field is the world, and the good seed are the children of the kingdom; the weeds are the children of the evil one, and the enemy who sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the age, and the reapers are angels.

Just as the weeds are collected and burned up with fire, so will it be at the end of the age. The Son of Man will send his angels, and they will collect out of his kingdom all causes of sin and all evildoers, and they will throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Let anyone with ears listen!

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 30, 2013

Matthew 13: 36-43

Then he left the crowds and went into the house. And his disciples approached him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds of the field.” He answered, “The one who sows the good seed is the Son of Man; the field is the world, and the good seed are the children of the kingdom; the weeds are the children of the evil one, and the enemy who sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the age, and the reapers are angels.

Just as the weeds are collected and burned up with fire, so will it be at the end of the age. The Son of Man will send his angels, and they will collect out of his kingdom all causes of sin and all evildoers, and they will throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Let anyone with ears listen!

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Active Service

This year’s World Youth Day, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil closed on Sunday with Mass celebrated by Pope Francis with nearly 3 million young pilgrims at Campus Fidei.  This gathering site became a gigantic meeting tent where the Holy Father invited all present to lives of prayer and simplicity, leadership and active service –service especially of the poor and those on the margins of society.

Moses’ words in today’s reading from Exodus were certainly echoed on Sunday in Brazil:  “The Lord, a merciful and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity, continuing his kindness for a thousand generations.”  Surely those present formed one of those “thousand generations” Moses was speaking about.

The challenge of any large spiritual gathering—especially one as moving as WYD—is to translate the spiritual energy and personal enthusiasm into daily practice.  For all of us in the shadow of this global faith event today’s gospel offers a cue.  How is that in an ongoing way we harvest the good seed from this event into the routine of our daily living?  “Whoever has ears ought to hear,”  Jesus exclaims.  What have I heard and seen recently that moves me to gather in even a small part of this spiritual harvest … just today?!

Dear Young People:  do not bury your talents, the gifts that God has given you!  Do not be afraid to dream of great things.  The Holy Spirit truly transforms us.  With our cooperation, he also wants to transform the world we live in.          

Pope Francis

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord, we believe that we are here
not here by chance, but by your choosing. Your
hand formed us and made us the people we are.
You compare us to no one else —
we are one of a kind. We lack nothing  your grace
can’t give us. You have allowed us to be here at
this time in history to fulfill your special purpose
for this generation.

Roy Lessin, author of Christian daily devotions


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord Jesus, teach me to be generous;
teach me to serve you
as you deserve,
to give and not to count the cost,
to fight and not to heed the wounds,
to toil and not to seek for rest,
to labor and not to seek reward,
except that of knowing that
I do your will.
Amen.

—St. Ignatius of Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The “Both / And” of Daily Living

This is the memorial feast day for St. Martha.  She is one of my favorite and personally familiar women in the bible.  I oftentimes feel like the Martha described in this Gospel narrative:  that it is all up to me; that the more I accomplish the better I am as a person; that I will be recognized and appreciated for the hard work that I do.  Yeah, right!

It is often easy to play off Mary’s way as better than Martha’s.  In reality, both personal aspects of Mary and Martha are a part of my own sense of self.  There is always the interplay of both of these within me:  the contemplative, quiet and mindful Mary…along with the active, energetic and productive Martha.  A visual example of this reality is found in the familiar ying-yang symbol.

An essential invitation in Ignatian Spirituality is to become a “contemplative in action.”  Since both realities are essential aspects of our nature, they are thus essential aspects of a fruitful spiritual relationship with God.  One is not better than the other, but the balance of both is essential for effective daily living.

We fulfill our Christian vocations and live more meaningful lives when we both contemplatively welcome and receive God’s presence in our own lives, and actively express God’s love and forgiveness in word and action with our neighbors.  Faith is both contemplative and active, inward and outward, personal and communal.

How am I attentive to both the contemplative and active side of living and expressing my Christian vocation?  

—Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. is minister of the Loyola University Jesuit Community, Chicago, and also serves on the vocations staff for the Chicago-Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!