Prayer

Lord, how can it be that those who should most understand the experience and insight we bring to a challenge or opportunity can be the most dismissive? Give us the grace to persist for the good despite the lack of affirmation or encouragement. There are also times when we undervalue the contribution of another because of the person’s age or because of our familiarity with the individual. Lord, guide us to approach this day realizing that we must never decide in advance who will be your spokesperson.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prophets on their Home Turf

Today’s gospel reading marks a new section in Matthew in which Jesus begins the way of the Cross more explicitly and prepares his disciples to carry on after him. His rejection begins in his hometown!

Through his teaching in the synagogue, Jesus astounds the people. Rather than hearing his deeper meaning, however, the crowd focuses on the superficial and turns on Jesus: They wonder, How can the carpenter’s son, whose family we all know, be so full of wisdom and power?

Two phrases immediately come to mind: “You can’t go home again” and “familiarity breeds contempt.”

One of their very own had gone away and earned a reputation for building a kingdom of love and healing, yet even he acknowledges that “prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” Despite recognizing Jesus as special and the bearer of a mighty message, his own homeland becomes hostile territory.

Probably all of us have had some experience, directly or indirectly, of this! We Irish, in particular, are well known for our ‘begrudgery’!

It might be helpful for us to see how often and where we ourselves have been guilty of this. How often have we written off what people we know very well, or think we know very well, suggest to us? It is important for us to realize that God can communicate with us through anyone at all and we must never decide in advance who his spokespersons will be.

Finally, we are told that Jesus could not do in Nazareth any of the wonderful things he had done elsewhere “because of their lack of faith”. His hands were tied. Jesus can only help those who are ready to be helped, those who are open to him. How open am I?

—Jeremy Langford, Director of Communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mt 13:54-58

He came to his hometown and began to teach the people in their synagogue, so that they were astounded and said, “Where did this man get this wisdom and these deeds of power? Is not this the carpenter’s son? Is not his mother called Mary? And are not his brothers James and Joseph and Simon and Judas? And are not all his sisters with us?

Where then did this man get all this?” And they took offense at him. But Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” And he did not do many deeds of power there, because of their unbelief.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 2, 2013

Mt 13: 54-58

He came to his hometown and began to teach the people in their synagogue, so that they were astounded and said, “Where did this man get this wisdom and these deeds of power? Is not this the carpenter’s son? Is not his mother called Mary? And are not his brothers James and Joseph and Simon and Judas? And are not all his sisters with us?

Where then did this man get all this?” And they took offense at him. But Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” And he did not do many deeds of power there, because of their unbelief.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Prophets on their Home Turf

Today’s gospel reading marks a new section in Matthew in which Jesus begins the way of the Cross more explicitly and prepares his disciples to carry on after him. His rejection begins in his hometown!

Through his teaching in the synagogue, Jesus astounds the people. Rather than hearing his deeper meaning, however, the crowd focuses on the superficial and turns on Jesus. They wonder, How can the carpenter’s son, whose family we all know, be so full of wisdom and power?

Two phrases immediately come to mind: “You can’t go home again” and “familiarity breeds contempt.”

Jesus, one of their very own, had gone away and earned a reputation for building a kingdom of love and healing, yet even he acknowledges that “prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” Despite recognizing Jesus as special and the bearer of a mighty message, Jesus’ own people miss the sacred for the mundane and turn homeland into hostile territory. As a result, Jesus does not perform any great works because of the people’s unbelief.

St. Ignatius invites us to put ourselves into these scenes so that we can better understand the gospel message and ourselves.

Ask yourself, when have I written someone off because of what I know, or think I know, of him or her? How open am I to allowing God to communicate with me through others?

—Jeremy Langford, Director of Communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

Lord, how can it be that those who should most understand the experience and insight we bring to a challenge or opportunity can be the most dismissive? Give us the grace to persist for the good despite the lack of affirmation or encouragement. There are also times when we undervalue the contribution of another because of the person’s age or because of our familiarity with the individual. Lord, guide us to approach this day realizing that we must never decide in advance who will be your spokesperson.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

Lord, how can it be that those who should most understand the experience and insight we bring to a challenge or opportunity can be the most dismissive? Give us the grace to persist for the good despite the lack of affirmation or encouragement. There are also times when we undervalue the contribution of another because of the person’s age or because of our familiarity with the individual. Lord, guide us to approach this day realizing that we must never decide in advance who will be your spokesperson.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prophets on their Home Turf

Today’s gospel reading marks a new section in Matthew in which Jesus begins the way of the Cross more explicitly and prepares his disciples to carry on after him. His rejection begins in his hometown!

Through his teaching in the synagogue, Jesus astounds the people. Rather than hearing his deeper meaning, however, the crowd focuses on the superficial and turns on Jesus: They wonder, How can the carpenter’s son, whose family we all know, be so full of wisdom and power?

Two phrases immediately come to mind: “You can’t go home again” and “familiarity breeds contempt.”

One of their very own had gone away and earned a reputation for building a kingdom of love and healing, yet even he acknowledges that “prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” Despite recognizing Jesus as special and the bearer of a mighty message, his own homeland becomes hostile territory.

Probably all of us have had some experience, directly or indirectly, of this! We Irish, in particular, are well known for our ‘begrudgery’!

It might be helpful for us to see how often and where we ourselves have been guilty of this. How often have we written off what people we know very well, or think we know very well, suggest to us? It is important for us to realize that God can communicate with us through anyone at all and we must never decide in advance who his spokespersons will be.

Finally, we are told that Jesus could not do in Nazareth any of the wonderful things he had done elsewhere “because of their lack of faith”. His hands were tied. Jesus can only help those who are ready to be helped, those who are open to him. How open am I?

—Jeremy Langford, Director of Communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mt 13:54-58

He came to his hometown and began to teach the people in their synagogue, so that they were astounded and said, “Where did this man get this wisdom and these deeds of power? Is not this the carpenter’s son? Is not his mother called Mary? And are not his brothers James and Joseph and Simon and Judas? And are not all his sisters with us?

Where then did this man get all this?” And they took offense at him. But Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” And he did not do many deeds of power there, because of their unbelief.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 2, 2013

Mt 13: 54-58

He came to his hometown and began to teach the people in their synagogue, so that they were astounded and said, “Where did this man get this wisdom and these deeds of power? Is not this the carpenter’s son? Is not his mother called Mary? And are not his brothers James and Joseph and Simon and Judas? And are not all his sisters with us?

Where then did this man get all this?” And they took offense at him. But Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” And he did not do many deeds of power there, because of their unbelief.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Prophets on their Home Turf

Today’s gospel reading marks a new section in Matthew in which Jesus begins the way of the Cross more explicitly and prepares his disciples to carry on after him. His rejection begins in his hometown!

Through his teaching in the synagogue, Jesus astounds the people. Rather than hearing his deeper meaning, however, the crowd focuses on the superficial and turns on Jesus. They wonder, How can the carpenter’s son, whose family we all know, be so full of wisdom and power?

Two phrases immediately come to mind: “You can’t go home again” and “familiarity breeds contempt.”

Jesus, one of their very own, had gone away and earned a reputation for building a kingdom of love and healing, yet even he acknowledges that “prophets are not without honor except in their own country and in their own house.” Despite recognizing Jesus as special and the bearer of a mighty message, Jesus’ own people miss the sacred for the mundane and turn homeland into hostile territory. As a result, Jesus does not perform any great works because of the people’s unbelief.

St. Ignatius invites us to put ourselves into these scenes so that we can better understand the gospel message and ourselves.

Ask yourself, when have I written someone off because of what I know, or think I know, of him or her? How open am I to allowing God to communicate with me through others?

—Jeremy Langford, Director of Communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

Lord, how can it be that those who should most understand the experience and insight we bring to a challenge or opportunity can be the most dismissive? Give us the grace to persist for the good despite the lack of affirmation or encouragement. There are also times when we undervalue the contribution of another because of the person’s age or because of our familiarity with the individual. Lord, guide us to approach this day realizing that we must never decide in advance who will be your spokesperson.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!