August 9, 2013

Matthew 16: 24-28

Then Jesus told his disciples, ‘If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it. For what will it profit them if they gain the whole world but forfeit their life? Or what will they give in return for their life?

‘For the Son of Man is to come with his angels in the glory of his Father, and then he will repay everyone for what has been done. Truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Cost of Discipleship

The great scholar and Catholic apologist G. K. Chesterton observed, “The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried.”

Responding to Christ’s call is never easy. We have a hard enough time doing the basics such as praying and being charitable, let alone denying ourselves and taking up our crosses!

But Christ never promised us that discipleship would be easy. In fact, he taught us that to be a disciple is to pay a price.

In his book The Cost of Discipleship, the Lutheran martyr-theologian Dietrich Bonheoffer–who died at age 39 in 1945 at the hands of the Gestapo in the concentration camp at Flossenbürg–explains that the greatest enemy of discipleship is “cheap grace.” The kind of grace that showers blessings without asking questions, fixing limits, or requiring action. The kind of grace that offers forgiveness of sin without transforming the sinner, baptism without church discipline, communion without confession, absolution without contrition, discipleship without the Cross. Simply put: Cheap grace is grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate.

True discipleship, Bonhoffer explains, is a costly grace—costly because it calls us to follow, grace because it calls us to embrace the source of life. Costly because it condemns sin, and grace because it forgives the sinner. Costly because the Son was rejected and killed, and grace because in dying Jesus revealed that the cross is not the end but the beginning.

The reward of discipleship is that we die to the self that we have created and find the self that exists as a living, breathing image of the divine. We let go of the possessions that weigh us down and we become free to live more fully. We find our truest selves, and in turn, we help others find theirs in everyday life and in extraordinary ways.

How can we respond to Christ’s call more fully? What obstacles stand in our way? How can we become better agents of love and healing—even in simple ways day to day?

—Jeremy Langford, Director of Communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

For today’s prayer, we invite you to view this 90-second video reflection by Fr. Jim Grummer, SJ, US Secretary for the Jesuits in Rome, on Caravaggio’s “The Calling of St. Matthew.”

And we pray, loving and gracious God, help me have eyes to see and ears to hear where you are calling me. Thank you for the gift of life and my unique talents. Help me put my gifts to use to serve wherever the need is greatest.

Amen.

–The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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August 9, 2013

Matthew 16: 24-28

Then Jesus told his disciples, ‘If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it. For what will it profit them if they gain the whole world but forfeit their life? Or what will they give in return for their life?

‘For the Son of Man is to come with his angels in the glory of his Father, and then he will repay everyone for what has been done. Truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Cost of Discipleship

The great scholar and Catholic apologist G. K. Chesterton observed, “The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried.”

Responding to Christ’s call is never easy. We have a hard enough time doing the basics such as praying and being charitable, let alone denying ourselves and taking up our crosses!

But Christ never promised us that discipleship would be easy. In fact, he taught us that to be a disciple is to pay a price.

In his book The Cost of Discipleship, the Lutheran martyr-theologian Dietrich Bonheoffer–who died at age 39 in 1945 at the hands of the Gestapo in the concentration camp at Flossenbürg–explains that the greatest enemy of discipleship is “cheap grace.” The kind of grace that showers blessings without asking questions, fixing limits, or requiring action. The kind of grace that offers forgiveness of sin without transforming the sinner, baptism without church discipline, communion without confession, absolution without contrition, discipleship without the Cross. Simply put: Cheap grace is grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate.

True discipleship, Bonhoffer explains, is a costly grace—costly because it calls us to follow, grace because it calls us to embrace the source of life. Costly because it condemns sin, and grace because it forgives the sinner. Costly because the Son was rejected and killed, and grace because in dying Jesus revealed that the cross is not the end but the beginning.

The reward of discipleship is that we die to the self that we have created and find the self that exists as a living, breathing image of the divine. We let go of the possessions that weigh us down and we become free to live more fully. We find our truest selves, and in turn, we help others find theirs in everyday life and in extraordinary ways.

How can we respond to Christ’s call more fully? What obstacles stand in our way? How can we become better agents of love and healing—even in simple ways day to day?

—Jeremy Langford, Director of Communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

For today’s prayer, we invite you to view this 90-second video reflection by Fr. Jim Grummer, SJ, US Secretary for the Jesuits in Rome, on Caravaggio’s “The Calling of St. Matthew.”

And we pray, loving and gracious God, help me have eyes to see and ears to hear where you are calling me. Thank you for the gift of life and my unique talents. Help me put my gifts to use to serve wherever the need is greatest.

Amen.

–The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!