Prayer

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, Hear me.
From the desire of being esteemed, Deliver me Jesus.
From the desire of being loved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being extolled, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being honored, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being praised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being preferred to others, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being consulted,  Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being approved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being humiliated, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being despised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of suffering rebukes, Deliver me, Jesus.

—Excerpted from the Litany of Humility by Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val (1865-1930), Secretary of State to Pope Saint Pius X


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The Importance of Ordinary Things

In today’s gospel we hear a short story about Jesus paying the temple tax.  Technically, because Jesus and his disciples were foreigners, they were exempt from paying the temple tax. However, it appears that Jesus was mindful that to refrain from paying the tax would be offensive to some. Speaking to Peter, Jesus says, “so that we do not give offense to them” give them the coin you find and pay the tax. Perhaps Jesus believed people would be more open to his message if he paid the tax. Maybe he thought listeners would trust him as a teacher if he paid the tax. Possibly he hoped followers would give him the benefit of the doubt if he paid the tax. Whatever the motive, Jesus felt it was important not to offend the community.

One might say Pope Francis is choosing to live so as not to offend.  Rather than live in luxury, he resides in a modest hotel. Rather than drive around in a Mercedes, Papa Francesco chooses a humble Ford Focus. Rather than a cross made from gold, Francis wears one made of iron. Possibly he is hoping that these simple acts will draw people to Jesus’ good news. Whatever the motive, Pope Francis is choosing humility rather than offense and the worldwide community is watching with renewed interest and respect.

Our actions impact people in our midst. Is there an area of our lives that some, who do not know us well, might find offensive? What concrete actions can we take so “that we do not give offense” and, in turn, more fully reflect the love of Jesus that dwells in our hearts?

—Sharron Deax Hanisch earned an MA in theology from the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry (formerly Weston Jesuit School of Theology). She is the mother of four children and a teacher at the School of Lectio Divina, St. Joseph Monastery, Tulsa, OK 


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Matthew 17: 22-27

As they were gathering in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is going to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and on the third day he will be raised.” And they were greatly distressed.

When they reached Capernaum, the collectors of the temple tax came to Peter and said, “Does your teacher not pay the temple tax?” He said, “Yes, he does.” And when he came home, Jesus spoke of it first, asking, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do kings of the earth take toll or tribute? From their children or from others?”

When Peter said, “From others,” Jesus said to him, “Then the children are free. However, so that we do not give offense to them, go to the sea and cast a hook; take the first fish that comes up; and when you open its mouth, you will find a coin; take that and give it to them for you and me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


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August 12, 2013

Matthew 17: 22-27

As they were gathering in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is going to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and on the third day he will be raised.” And they were greatly distressed.

When they reached Capernaum, the collectors of the temple tax came to Peter and said, “Does your teacher not pay the temple tax?” He said, “Yes, he does.” And when he came home, Jesus spoke of it first, asking, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do kings of the earth take toll or tribute? From their children or from others?”

When Peter said, “From others,” Jesus said to him, “Then the children are free. However, so that we do not give offense to them, go to the sea and cast a hook; take the first fish that comes up; and when you open its mouth, you will find a coin; take that and give it to them for you and me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Importance of Ordinary Things

In today’s gospel we hear a short story about Jesus paying the temple tax.  Technically, because Jesus and his disciples were foreigners, they were exempt from paying the temple tax. However, it appears that Jesus was mindful that to refrain from paying the tax would be offensive to some. Speaking to Peter, Jesus says, “so that we do not give offense to them” give them the coin you find and pay the tax. Perhaps Jesus believed people would be more open to his message if he paid the tax. Maybe he thought listeners would trust him as a teacher if he paid the tax. Possibly he hoped followers would give him the benefit of the doubt if he paid the tax. Whatever the motive, Jesus felt it was important not to offend the community.

One might say Pope Francis is choosing to live so as not to offend.  Rather than live in luxury, he resides in a modest hotel. Rather than drive around in a Mercedes, Papa Francesco chooses a humble Ford Focus. Rather than a cross made from gold, Francis wears one made of iron. Possibly he is hoping that these simple acts will draw people to Jesus’ good news. Whatever the motive, Pope Francis is choosing humility rather than offense and the worldwide community is watching with renewed interest and respect.

Our actions impact people in our midst. Is there an area of our lives that some, who do not know us well, might find offensive? What concrete actions can we take so “that we do not give offense” and, in turn, more fully reflect the love of Jesus that dwells in our hearts?

—Sharron Deax Hanisch earned an MA in theology from the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry (formerly Weston Jesuit School of Theology). She is the mother of four children and a teacher at the School of Lectio Divina, St. Joseph Monastery, Tulsa, OK

Prayer

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, Hear me.
From the desire of being esteemed, Deliver me Jesus.
From the desire of being loved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being extolled, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being honored, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being praised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being preferred to others, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being consulted,  Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being approved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being humiliated, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being despised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of suffering rebukes, Deliver me, Jesus.

—Excerpted from the Litany of Humility by Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val (1865-1930), Secretary of State to Pope Saint Pius X


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, Hear me.
From the desire of being esteemed, Deliver me Jesus.
From the desire of being loved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being extolled, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being honored, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being praised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being preferred to others, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being consulted,  Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being approved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being humiliated, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being despised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of suffering rebukes, Deliver me, Jesus.

—Excerpted from the Litany of Humility by Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val (1865-1930), Secretary of State to Pope Saint Pius X


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Importance of Ordinary Things

In today’s gospel we hear a short story about Jesus paying the temple tax.  Technically, because Jesus and his disciples were foreigners, they were exempt from paying the temple tax. However, it appears that Jesus was mindful that to refrain from paying the tax would be offensive to some. Speaking to Peter, Jesus says, “so that we do not give offense to them” give them the coin you find and pay the tax. Perhaps Jesus believed people would be more open to his message if he paid the tax. Maybe he thought listeners would trust him as a teacher if he paid the tax. Possibly he hoped followers would give him the benefit of the doubt if he paid the tax. Whatever the motive, Jesus felt it was important not to offend the community.

One might say Pope Francis is choosing to live so as not to offend.  Rather than live in luxury, he resides in a modest hotel. Rather than drive around in a Mercedes, Papa Francesco chooses a humble Ford Focus. Rather than a cross made from gold, Francis wears one made of iron. Possibly he is hoping that these simple acts will draw people to Jesus’ good news. Whatever the motive, Pope Francis is choosing humility rather than offense and the worldwide community is watching with renewed interest and respect.

Our actions impact people in our midst. Is there an area of our lives that some, who do not know us well, might find offensive? What concrete actions can we take so “that we do not give offense” and, in turn, more fully reflect the love of Jesus that dwells in our hearts?

—Sharron Deax Hanisch earned an MA in theology from the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry (formerly Weston Jesuit School of Theology). She is the mother of four children and a teacher at the School of Lectio Divina, St. Joseph Monastery, Tulsa, OK 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Matthew 17: 22-27

As they were gathering in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is going to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and on the third day he will be raised.” And they were greatly distressed.

When they reached Capernaum, the collectors of the temple tax came to Peter and said, “Does your teacher not pay the temple tax?” He said, “Yes, he does.” And when he came home, Jesus spoke of it first, asking, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do kings of the earth take toll or tribute? From their children or from others?”

When Peter said, “From others,” Jesus said to him, “Then the children are free. However, so that we do not give offense to them, go to the sea and cast a hook; take the first fish that comes up; and when you open its mouth, you will find a coin; take that and give it to them for you and me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 12, 2013

Matthew 17: 22-27

As they were gathering in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is going to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and on the third day he will be raised.” And they were greatly distressed.

When they reached Capernaum, the collectors of the temple tax came to Peter and said, “Does your teacher not pay the temple tax?” He said, “Yes, he does.” And when he came home, Jesus spoke of it first, asking, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do kings of the earth take toll or tribute? From their children or from others?”

When Peter said, “From others,” Jesus said to him, “Then the children are free. However, so that we do not give offense to them, go to the sea and cast a hook; take the first fish that comes up; and when you open its mouth, you will find a coin; take that and give it to them for you and me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Importance of Ordinary Things

In today’s gospel we hear a short story about Jesus paying the temple tax.  Technically, because Jesus and his disciples were foreigners, they were exempt from paying the temple tax. However, it appears that Jesus was mindful that to refrain from paying the tax would be offensive to some. Speaking to Peter, Jesus says, “so that we do not give offense to them” give them the coin you find and pay the tax. Perhaps Jesus believed people would be more open to his message if he paid the tax. Maybe he thought listeners would trust him as a teacher if he paid the tax. Possibly he hoped followers would give him the benefit of the doubt if he paid the tax. Whatever the motive, Jesus felt it was important not to offend the community.

One might say Pope Francis is choosing to live so as not to offend.  Rather than live in luxury, he resides in a modest hotel. Rather than drive around in a Mercedes, Papa Francesco chooses a humble Ford Focus. Rather than a cross made from gold, Francis wears one made of iron. Possibly he is hoping that these simple acts will draw people to Jesus’ good news. Whatever the motive, Pope Francis is choosing humility rather than offense and the worldwide community is watching with renewed interest and respect.

Our actions impact people in our midst. Is there an area of our lives that some, who do not know us well, might find offensive? What concrete actions can we take so “that we do not give offense” and, in turn, more fully reflect the love of Jesus that dwells in our hearts?

—Sharron Deax Hanisch earned an MA in theology from the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry (formerly Weston Jesuit School of Theology). She is the mother of four children and a teacher at the School of Lectio Divina, St. Joseph Monastery, Tulsa, OK

Prayer

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, Hear me.
From the desire of being esteemed, Deliver me Jesus.
From the desire of being loved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being extolled, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being honored, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being praised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being preferred to others, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being consulted,  Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being approved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being humiliated, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being despised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of suffering rebukes, Deliver me, Jesus.

—Excerpted from the Litany of Humility by Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val (1865-1930), Secretary of State to Pope Saint Pius X


Please share the Good Word with your friends!