Prayer

Lord, the depth of your sacrifice is incomprehensible. It is mind-boggling that you accepted the scourge and the thorns, the cross and the nails, and allowed the suffering inflicted by loneliness and abandonment to pierce your heart. Lord, if we cling to anything that mocks at your sacrifice, help us to admit our wrongdoing and to change our thoughts and actions.

Should we falter toward arrogance, help us to realize the truth about our motives. And guide us toward a spirit motivated by service and cautious of service motivated by ego and recognition.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


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Yearning for Forgiveness

In today’s Gospel, Jesus tells a story about two characters well-known to his listeners.  The Pharisee is a man true to the religious norms of his time; he’s following all of the rules and is quite proud of himself.  All the people listening to Jesus’ story would have agreed with the Pharisee that he should be commended for being a good man.

Similarly, the tax collector is rightfully despised for being a traitor and thief.  Tax collectors must have had a lonely existence since, having betrayed their own people, they would have been publicly shunned. Their Roman masters would have similarly disdained such men regardless of their usefulness for tax collecting activities.  In truth, the tax collector has made bad choices, and he knows it.

Jesus could not have offered a parable that superficially presented two of the most opposite socially situated persons in his culture. And he draws a conclusion that any reflective listener knows is true: the socially reviled man is justified in approaching God, while the Pharisee is not.

It seems to me that Jesus is a genius at making distinctions.  He is able to cut through what only appears to be true so as to reveal the core of what is real. What is real in God’s view is the disposition of each of the men. The Pharisee approaches God with a sense that somehow he is owed something for following the rules. The tax collector acknowledges his moral failures, and approaches God with the humility of someone who knows he doesn’t deserve God’s love. Yet he longs to experience that divine love and forgiveness down deep in his heart.

How do you approach Jesus?  What is your   demeanor and attitude toward other people and the choices they make, even when they’re poor choices?

—Fr. Jim Prehn, S.J. is Vocation Director for the Chicago-Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus.  Learn more about the Jesuits at www.thinkjesuits.org  


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

October 27, 2013

Luke 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Yearning for Forgiveness

In today’s Gospel, Jesus tells a story about two characters well-known to his listeners.  The Pharisee is a man true to the religious norms of his time; he’s following all of the rules and is quite proud of himself.  All the people listening to Jesus’ story would have agreed with the Pharisee that he should be commended for being a good man.

Similarly, the tax collector is rightfully despised for being a traitor and thief.  Tax collectors must have had a lonely existence since, having betrayed their own people, they would have been publicly shunned. Their Roman masters would have similarly disdained such men regardless of their usefulness for tax collecting activities.  In truth, the tax collector has made bad choices, and he knows it.

Jesus could not have offered a parable that superficially presented two of the most opposite socially situated persons in his culture. And he draws a conclusion that any reflective listener knows is true: the socially reviled man is justified in approaching God, while the Pharisee is not.

It seems to me that Jesus is a genius at making distinctions.  He is able to cut through what only appears to be true so as to reveal the core of what is real. What is real in God’s view is the disposition of each of the men. The Pharisee approaches God with a sense that somehow he is owed something for following the rules. The tax collector acknowledges his moral failures, and approaches God with the humility of someone who knows he doesn’t deserve God’s love. Yet he longs to experience that divine love and forgiveness down deep in his heart.

How do you approach Jesus?  What is your   demeanor and attitude toward other people and the choices they make, even when they’re poor choices?

—Fr. Jim Prehn, S.J. is Vocation Director for the Chicago-Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus.  Learn more about the Jesuits at www.thinkjesuits.org  

Prayer

Lord, the depth of your sacrifice is incomprehensible. It is mind-boggling that you accepted the scourge and the thorns, the cross and the nails, and allowed the suffering inflicted by loneliness and abandonment to pierce your heart. Lord, if we cling to anything that mocks at your sacrifice, help us to admit our wrongdoing and to change our thoughts and actions.

Should we falter toward arrogance, help us to realize the truth about our motives. And guide us toward a spirit motivated by service and cautious of service motivated by ego and recognition.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

Lord, the depth of your sacrifice is incomprehensible. It is mind-boggling that you accepted the scourge and the thorns, the cross and the nails, and allowed the suffering inflicted by loneliness and abandonment to pierce your heart. Lord, if we cling to anything that mocks at your sacrifice, help us to admit our wrongdoing and to change our thoughts and actions.

Should we falter toward arrogance, help us to realize the truth about our motives. And guide us toward a spirit motivated by service and cautious of service motivated by ego and recognition.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Yearning for Forgiveness

In today’s Gospel, Jesus tells a story about two characters well-known to his listeners.  The Pharisee is a man true to the religious norms of his time; he’s following all of the rules and is quite proud of himself.  All the people listening to Jesus’ story would have agreed with the Pharisee that he should be commended for being a good man.

Similarly, the tax collector is rightfully despised for being a traitor and thief.  Tax collectors must have had a lonely existence since, having betrayed their own people, they would have been publicly shunned. Their Roman masters would have similarly disdained such men regardless of their usefulness for tax collecting activities.  In truth, the tax collector has made bad choices, and he knows it.

Jesus could not have offered a parable that superficially presented two of the most opposite socially situated persons in his culture. And he draws a conclusion that any reflective listener knows is true: the socially reviled man is justified in approaching God, while the Pharisee is not.

It seems to me that Jesus is a genius at making distinctions.  He is able to cut through what only appears to be true so as to reveal the core of what is real. What is real in God’s view is the disposition of each of the men. The Pharisee approaches God with a sense that somehow he is owed something for following the rules. The tax collector acknowledges his moral failures, and approaches God with the humility of someone who knows he doesn’t deserve God’s love. Yet he longs to experience that divine love and forgiveness down deep in his heart.

How do you approach Jesus?  What is your   demeanor and attitude toward other people and the choices they make, even when they’re poor choices?

—Fr. Jim Prehn, S.J. is Vocation Director for the Chicago-Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus.  Learn more about the Jesuits at www.thinkjesuits.org  


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

October 27, 2013

Luke 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Yearning for Forgiveness

In today’s Gospel, Jesus tells a story about two characters well-known to his listeners.  The Pharisee is a man true to the religious norms of his time; he’s following all of the rules and is quite proud of himself.  All the people listening to Jesus’ story would have agreed with the Pharisee that he should be commended for being a good man.

Similarly, the tax collector is rightfully despised for being a traitor and thief.  Tax collectors must have had a lonely existence since, having betrayed their own people, they would have been publicly shunned. Their Roman masters would have similarly disdained such men regardless of their usefulness for tax collecting activities.  In truth, the tax collector has made bad choices, and he knows it.

Jesus could not have offered a parable that superficially presented two of the most opposite socially situated persons in his culture. And he draws a conclusion that any reflective listener knows is true: the socially reviled man is justified in approaching God, while the Pharisee is not.

It seems to me that Jesus is a genius at making distinctions.  He is able to cut through what only appears to be true so as to reveal the core of what is real. What is real in God’s view is the disposition of each of the men. The Pharisee approaches God with a sense that somehow he is owed something for following the rules. The tax collector acknowledges his moral failures, and approaches God with the humility of someone who knows he doesn’t deserve God’s love. Yet he longs to experience that divine love and forgiveness down deep in his heart.

How do you approach Jesus?  What is your   demeanor and attitude toward other people and the choices they make, even when they’re poor choices?

—Fr. Jim Prehn, S.J. is Vocation Director for the Chicago-Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus.  Learn more about the Jesuits at www.thinkjesuits.org  

Prayer

Lord, the depth of your sacrifice is incomprehensible. It is mind-boggling that you accepted the scourge and the thorns, the cross and the nails, and allowed the suffering inflicted by loneliness and abandonment to pierce your heart. Lord, if we cling to anything that mocks at your sacrifice, help us to admit our wrongdoing and to change our thoughts and actions.

Should we falter toward arrogance, help us to realize the truth about our motives. And guide us toward a spirit motivated by service and cautious of service motivated by ego and recognition.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!