Prayer

This last day of the current liturgical year,

let us bless God for all the graces and gifts of this past year of grace and simply say:

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and always will be, world without end. Amen!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

It’s our turn!

In the Gospel on today’s feast of St. Andrew, Jesus calls Peter and Andrew from their fishing and invites them to be fishers of men. And, amazingly, they say “yes”. What was it about Christ that was so compelling that they would put aside the urgent task of earning their daily bread and focus instead on his message? Perhaps it was a depth of peace they saw in him that they yearned for themselves. Or a confidence so inspiring that, as Paul says in today’s epistle, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

Jesus’ message of peace, unity, equality and love must have spoken to the heart’s core of an oppressed people, searching for a savior. How privileged the apostles were to know Christ and to become the instruments of his mission, to play their part in salvation history. And now…it’s our turn.

How can people call on Christ in whom they have not believed? And how can they believe in him of whom they have not heard? And how can they hear without someone to preach? And who will bring the message to them in word and deed? As Michael Jackson sang, “I’m startin’ with the man in the mirror.”

It’s up to each of us to pick up the mantel of St. Andrew and others and play our part in the great enterprise which is the bringing about of the Kingdom of God.

WE are the “someone”!

—Pam Coster is Executive Director of Charis Ministries. Founded in 2000, Charis Ministries reaches those in their 20s and 30s nationwide, nurturing their faith through retreats based in Ignatian spirituality. www.charisministries.org


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Andrew, apostle

Romans 10: 9-18

Because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved. The scripture says, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him. For, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.” But how are they to call on one in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in one of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone to proclaim him? And how are they to proclaim him unless they are sent?

As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!” But not all have obeyed the good news; for Isaiah says, “Lord, who has believed our message?” So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes through the word of Christ. But I ask, have they not heard? Indeed they have; for “Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 30, 2013

Andrew, apostle

Romans 10: 9-18

Because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved. The scripture says, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him. For, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.” But how are they to call on one in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in one of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone to proclaim him? And how are they to proclaim him unless they are sent?

As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!” But not all have obeyed the good news; for Isaiah says, “Lord, who has believed our message?” So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes through the word of Christ. But I ask, have they not heard? Indeed they have; for “Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

It’s our turn!

In the Gospel on today’s feast of St. Andrew, Jesus calls Peter and Andrew from their fishing and invites them to be fishers of men. And, amazingly, they say “yes”. What was it about Christ that was so compelling that they would put aside the urgent task of earning their daily bread and focus instead on his message?  Perhaps it was a depth of peace they saw in him that they yearned for themselves. Or a confidence so inspiring that, as Paul says in today’s epistle, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

Jesus’ message of peace, unity, equality and love must have spoken to the heart’s core of an oppressed people, searching for a savior.  How privileged the apostles were to know Christ and to become the instruments of his mission, to play their part in salvation history.  And now…it’s our turn.

How can people call on Christ in whom they have not believed? And how can they believe in him of whom they have not heard?  And how can they hear without someone to preach?  And who will bring the message to them in word and deed? As Michael Jackson sang, “I’m startin’ with the man in the mirror.”

It’s up to each of us to pick up the mantel of St. Andrew and others and play our part in the great enterprise which is the bringing about of the Kingdom of God.

WE are the “someone”!

—Pam Coster is Executive Director of Charis Ministries. Founded in 2000, Charis Ministries reaches those in their 20s and 30s nationwide, nurturing their faith through retreats based in Ignatian spirituality. www.charisministries.org

Prayer

This last day of the current liturgical year,

let us bless God for all the graces and gifts of this past year of grace and simply say:

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and always will be, world without end. Amen!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

St. Ignatius’s Spiritual Exercises offers a wide range of practices for developing a healthy spiritual life. One of them is the Examination of Conscience, or the Daily Examen—a restful prayer that invites us to evaluate the hours of the day in light of three central questions: What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What ought I do for Christ?

Daily Examen

God, I believe that at this quiet moment I am in your presence and you are now loving me. Come Holy Spirit.

God, I acknowledge your love for me in the various gifts for which I am very grateful. Thanks be to God.

God, help me now to review the events of this day in order to recognize you in all parts of my life. Lord, I want to see.

God, please forgive the times I have fallen short, and strengthen my attempts to follow you. Lord have mercy.

God, enlighten me so that my future choices praise, reverence, and serve you above all else. Show me your way.

Conclude with an Our Father…

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Living Sacramentally

In his poem “God’s Grandeur,” Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins observes, “the world is charged with the grandeur of God.” And for all our toil and trade, “nature is never spent.”

If Hopkins is right, then the world is filled with signs of the sacred. Our job, as today’s gospel reveals, is to read those signs and know that God is with us now and forever.

There are days when the signs are obvious: in the sunrise, wide-eyed wonder of a child, compassion of a friend, reaction of someone surprised by our care.

And then there are the other days—when the signs hide behind the clouds and the calamities, heartbreak, and frustrations of life.

These are the days when we are challenged to see with the eyes of faith. To turn “seeing is believing” into “believing is seeing.” To live sacramentally.

Living sacramentally is not merely about recognizing God in what we see, smell, touch, taste, and hear. It’s about being a living sacrament of God ourselves—in our homes, places of work, neighborhoods, churches, and communities. It’s about loving others, spreading peace and joy, being decent and ethical, fighting for people’s rights, caring for the Earth, and serving those in the greatest need?

Today and every day, how can we live more sacramentally?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 21: 29-33

Then he told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree and all the trees;as soon as they sprout leaves you can see for yourselves and know that summer is already near. So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all things have taken place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 29, 2013

Luke 21: 29-33

Then he told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree and all the trees;as soon as they sprout leaves you can see for yourselves and know that summer is already near. So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all things have taken place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Living Sacramentally

In his poem “God’s Grandeur,” Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins observes, “the world is charged with the grandeur of God.” And for all our toil and trade, “nature is never spent.”

If Hopkins is right, then the world is filled with signs of the sacred. Our job, as today’s gospel reveals, is to read those signs and know that God is with us now and forever.

There are days when the signs are obvious: in the sunrise, wide-eyed wonder of a child, compassion of a friend, reaction of someone surprised by our care.

And then there are the other days—when the signs hide behind the clouds and the calamities, heartbreak, and frustrations of life.

These are the days when we are challenged to see with the eyes of faith. To turn “seeing is believing” into “believing is seeing.” To live sacramentally.

Living sacramentally is not merely about recognizing God in what we see, smell, touch, taste, and hear. It’s about being a living sacrament of God ourselves—in our homes, places of work, neighborhoods, churches, and communities. It’s about loving others, spreading peace and joy, being decent and ethical, fighting for people’s rights, caring for the Earth, and serving those in the greatest need?

Today and every day, how can we live more sacramentally?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

St. Ignatius’s Spiritual Exercises offers a wide range of practices for developing a healthy spiritual life. One of them is the Examination of Conscience, or the Daily Examen—a restful prayer that invites us to evaluate the hours of the day in light of three central questions: What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What ought I do for Christ?

Daily Examen

God, I believe that at this quiet moment I am in your presence and you are now loving me. Come Holy Spirit.

God, I acknowledge your love for me in the various gifts for which I am very grateful. Thanks be to God.

God, help me now to review the events of this day in order to recognize you in all parts of my life. Lord, I want to see.

God, please forgive the times I have fallen short, and strengthen my attempts to follow you. Lord have mercy.

God, enlighten me so that my future choices praise, reverence, and serve you above all else. Show me your way.

Conclude with an Our Father…

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

O God, when I have food.
help me to remember the hungry;
When I have work,
help me to remember the jobless;
When I have a home,
help me to remember those who have no home at all;
When I am without pain,
help me to remember those who suffer,
And remembering,
help me to destroy my complacency;
bestir my compassion,
and be concerned enough to help;
By word and deed,
Those who cry out for what we take for granted.

—Samuel Pugh


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Lord Gives, Thanks Give

The Lord gives us all that we are and all that we have.

The Lord gives us every moment and every breath.

The Lord gives us life and love.

Sing psalms of thanksgiving to the Lord!

I love thee, O LORD, my strength.

The LORD is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer,
my God, my rock, in whom I take refuge,my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.

My soul is feasted as with marrow and fat,
and my mouth praises thee with joyful lips,
when I think of thee upon my bed,
and meditate on thee in the watches of the night;
for thou hast been my help,
and in the shadow of thy wings I sing for joy.

It is good to give thanks to the LORD,
to sing praises to thy name, O Most High;
to declare thy steadfast love in the morning,
and thy faithfulness by night.
For thou, O LORD, hast made me glad by thy work;
at the works of thy hands I sing for joy.
How great are thy works, O LORD!

My heart is steadfast, O God, my heart is steadfast!
I will sing and make melody!
Awake, my soul!
Awake, O harp and lyre!
I will awake the dawn!
I will give thanks to thee, O LORD, among the peoples,
I will sing praises to thee among the nations.
For thy steadfast love is great above the heavens,
thy faithfulness reaches to the clouds.

—Ted Munz, S.J., Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

This last day of the current liturgical year,

let us bless God for all the graces and gifts of this past year of grace and simply say:

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and always will be, world without end. Amen!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

It’s our turn!

In the Gospel on today’s feast of St. Andrew, Jesus calls Peter and Andrew from their fishing and invites them to be fishers of men. And, amazingly, they say “yes”. What was it about Christ that was so compelling that they would put aside the urgent task of earning their daily bread and focus instead on his message? Perhaps it was a depth of peace they saw in him that they yearned for themselves. Or a confidence so inspiring that, as Paul says in today’s epistle, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

Jesus’ message of peace, unity, equality and love must have spoken to the heart’s core of an oppressed people, searching for a savior. How privileged the apostles were to know Christ and to become the instruments of his mission, to play their part in salvation history. And now…it’s our turn.

How can people call on Christ in whom they have not believed? And how can they believe in him of whom they have not heard? And how can they hear without someone to preach? And who will bring the message to them in word and deed? As Michael Jackson sang, “I’m startin’ with the man in the mirror.”

It’s up to each of us to pick up the mantel of St. Andrew and others and play our part in the great enterprise which is the bringing about of the Kingdom of God.

WE are the “someone”!

—Pam Coster is Executive Director of Charis Ministries. Founded in 2000, Charis Ministries reaches those in their 20s and 30s nationwide, nurturing their faith through retreats based in Ignatian spirituality. www.charisministries.org


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Andrew, apostle

Romans 10: 9-18

Because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved. The scripture says, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him. For, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.” But how are they to call on one in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in one of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone to proclaim him? And how are they to proclaim him unless they are sent?

As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!” But not all have obeyed the good news; for Isaiah says, “Lord, who has believed our message?” So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes through the word of Christ. But I ask, have they not heard? Indeed they have; for “Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 30, 2013

Andrew, apostle

Romans 10: 9-18

Because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved. The scripture says, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him. For, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.” But how are they to call on one in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in one of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone to proclaim him? And how are they to proclaim him unless they are sent?

As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!” But not all have obeyed the good news; for Isaiah says, “Lord, who has believed our message?” So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes through the word of Christ. But I ask, have they not heard? Indeed they have; for “Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

It’s our turn!

In the Gospel on today’s feast of St. Andrew, Jesus calls Peter and Andrew from their fishing and invites them to be fishers of men. And, amazingly, they say “yes”. What was it about Christ that was so compelling that they would put aside the urgent task of earning their daily bread and focus instead on his message?  Perhaps it was a depth of peace they saw in him that they yearned for themselves. Or a confidence so inspiring that, as Paul says in today’s epistle, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

Jesus’ message of peace, unity, equality and love must have spoken to the heart’s core of an oppressed people, searching for a savior.  How privileged the apostles were to know Christ and to become the instruments of his mission, to play their part in salvation history.  And now…it’s our turn.

How can people call on Christ in whom they have not believed? And how can they believe in him of whom they have not heard?  And how can they hear without someone to preach?  And who will bring the message to them in word and deed? As Michael Jackson sang, “I’m startin’ with the man in the mirror.”

It’s up to each of us to pick up the mantel of St. Andrew and others and play our part in the great enterprise which is the bringing about of the Kingdom of God.

WE are the “someone”!

—Pam Coster is Executive Director of Charis Ministries. Founded in 2000, Charis Ministries reaches those in their 20s and 30s nationwide, nurturing their faith through retreats based in Ignatian spirituality. www.charisministries.org

Prayer

This last day of the current liturgical year,

let us bless God for all the graces and gifts of this past year of grace and simply say:

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and always will be, world without end. Amen!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

St. Ignatius’s Spiritual Exercises offers a wide range of practices for developing a healthy spiritual life. One of them is the Examination of Conscience, or the Daily Examen—a restful prayer that invites us to evaluate the hours of the day in light of three central questions: What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What ought I do for Christ?

Daily Examen

God, I believe that at this quiet moment I am in your presence and you are now loving me. Come Holy Spirit.

God, I acknowledge your love for me in the various gifts for which I am very grateful. Thanks be to God.

God, help me now to review the events of this day in order to recognize you in all parts of my life. Lord, I want to see.

God, please forgive the times I have fallen short, and strengthen my attempts to follow you. Lord have mercy.

God, enlighten me so that my future choices praise, reverence, and serve you above all else. Show me your way.

Conclude with an Our Father…

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Living Sacramentally

In his poem “God’s Grandeur,” Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins observes, “the world is charged with the grandeur of God.” And for all our toil and trade, “nature is never spent.”

If Hopkins is right, then the world is filled with signs of the sacred. Our job, as today’s gospel reveals, is to read those signs and know that God is with us now and forever.

There are days when the signs are obvious: in the sunrise, wide-eyed wonder of a child, compassion of a friend, reaction of someone surprised by our care.

And then there are the other days—when the signs hide behind the clouds and the calamities, heartbreak, and frustrations of life.

These are the days when we are challenged to see with the eyes of faith. To turn “seeing is believing” into “believing is seeing.” To live sacramentally.

Living sacramentally is not merely about recognizing God in what we see, smell, touch, taste, and hear. It’s about being a living sacrament of God ourselves—in our homes, places of work, neighborhoods, churches, and communities. It’s about loving others, spreading peace and joy, being decent and ethical, fighting for people’s rights, caring for the Earth, and serving those in the greatest need?

Today and every day, how can we live more sacramentally?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Luke 21: 29-33

Then he told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree and all the trees;as soon as they sprout leaves you can see for yourselves and know that summer is already near. So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all things have taken place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 29, 2013

Luke 21: 29-33

Then he told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree and all the trees;as soon as they sprout leaves you can see for yourselves and know that summer is already near. So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all things have taken place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Living Sacramentally

In his poem “God’s Grandeur,” Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins observes, “the world is charged with the grandeur of God.” And for all our toil and trade, “nature is never spent.”

If Hopkins is right, then the world is filled with signs of the sacred. Our job, as today’s gospel reveals, is to read those signs and know that God is with us now and forever.

There are days when the signs are obvious: in the sunrise, wide-eyed wonder of a child, compassion of a friend, reaction of someone surprised by our care.

And then there are the other days—when the signs hide behind the clouds and the calamities, heartbreak, and frustrations of life.

These are the days when we are challenged to see with the eyes of faith. To turn “seeing is believing” into “believing is seeing.” To live sacramentally.

Living sacramentally is not merely about recognizing God in what we see, smell, touch, taste, and hear. It’s about being a living sacrament of God ourselves—in our homes, places of work, neighborhoods, churches, and communities. It’s about loving others, spreading peace and joy, being decent and ethical, fighting for people’s rights, caring for the Earth, and serving those in the greatest need?

Today and every day, how can we live more sacramentally?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

St. Ignatius’s Spiritual Exercises offers a wide range of practices for developing a healthy spiritual life. One of them is the Examination of Conscience, or the Daily Examen—a restful prayer that invites us to evaluate the hours of the day in light of three central questions: What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What ought I do for Christ?

Daily Examen

God, I believe that at this quiet moment I am in your presence and you are now loving me. Come Holy Spirit.

God, I acknowledge your love for me in the various gifts for which I am very grateful. Thanks be to God.

God, help me now to review the events of this day in order to recognize you in all parts of my life. Lord, I want to see.

God, please forgive the times I have fallen short, and strengthen my attempts to follow you. Lord have mercy.

God, enlighten me so that my future choices praise, reverence, and serve you above all else. Show me your way.

Conclude with an Our Father…

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

O God, when I have food.
help me to remember the hungry;
When I have work,
help me to remember the jobless;
When I have a home,
help me to remember those who have no home at all;
When I am without pain,
help me to remember those who suffer,
And remembering,
help me to destroy my complacency;
bestir my compassion,
and be concerned enough to help;
By word and deed,
Those who cry out for what we take for granted.

—Samuel Pugh


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Lord Gives, Thanks Give

The Lord gives us all that we are and all that we have.

The Lord gives us every moment and every breath.

The Lord gives us life and love.

Sing psalms of thanksgiving to the Lord!

I love thee, O LORD, my strength.

The LORD is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer,
my God, my rock, in whom I take refuge,my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.

My soul is feasted as with marrow and fat,
and my mouth praises thee with joyful lips,
when I think of thee upon my bed,
and meditate on thee in the watches of the night;
for thou hast been my help,
and in the shadow of thy wings I sing for joy.

It is good to give thanks to the LORD,
to sing praises to thy name, O Most High;
to declare thy steadfast love in the morning,
and thy faithfulness by night.
For thou, O LORD, hast made me glad by thy work;
at the works of thy hands I sing for joy.
How great are thy works, O LORD!

My heart is steadfast, O God, my heart is steadfast!
I will sing and make melody!
Awake, my soul!
Awake, O harp and lyre!
I will awake the dawn!
I will give thanks to thee, O LORD, among the peoples,
I will sing praises to thee among the nations.
For thy steadfast love is great above the heavens,
thy faithfulness reaches to the clouds.

—Ted Munz, S.J., Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits


Please share the Good Word with your friends!