Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty
my memory, my understanding
and my entire will,
all I have and
call my own.
You have given all to me
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours
do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and grace,
that is enough for me.

—St. Ignatius of Loyola

(Click here to download this prayer card.)

 


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The Gift of Giving

All that I have and all that I am is a gift from God. All my talents and abilities, my family and friends, my experiences and growth, my life and faith—all these God has given to me. So, what should I do with all the gifts I have received?

At the end of the Spiritual Exercises, after having reflected on all the ways God has offered us abundant gifts and love, Ignatius encourages us to respond by offering these gifts and this love back to God.  Rather than holding on desperately to what we have and using our gifts solely for our own benefit, by offering our gifts and ourselves back to God, we allow God to guide us and our gifts towards greater love and service for others.

Today, we celebrate the feast of Saint Stephen, the first Christian martyr.  In the reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we hear of Stephen’s gifts of preaching and “working great wonders and signs.”  What a wonderful example of someone who handed over his gifts so that the Holy Spirit could work through him!  Even in his final words, Stephen continues to offer himself to God.

During this Christmas season, as we continue to rejoice in gratitude for the wonderful gift of the Incarnation, maybe we can take some time to reflect on the many gifts we have received and offer them  to God.

—Thomas Bambrick, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic in First Studies, studying philosophy at Fordham University, New York.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Stephen

Acts 6: 8-10; 7: 54-59

Stephen, full of grace and power, did great wonders and signs among the people. Then some of those who belonged to the synagogue of the Freedmen (as it was called), Cyrenians, Alexandrians, and others of those from Cilicia and Asia, stood up and argued with Stephen.  But they could not withstand the wisdom and the Spirit with which he spoke.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

December 26, 2013

St. Stephen

Acts 6: 8-10; 7: 54-59

Stephen, full of grace and power, did great wonders and signs among the people. Then some of those who belonged to the synagogue of the Freedmen (as it was called), Cyrenians, Alexandrians, and others of those from Cilicia and Asia, stood up and argued with Stephen.  But they could not withstand the wisdom and the Spirit with which he spoke.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Gift of Giving

All that I have and all that I am is a gift from God. All my talents and abilities, my family and friends, my experiences and growth, my life and faith—all these God has given to me. So, what should I do with all the gifts I have received?

At the end of the Spiritual Exercises, after having reflected on all the ways God has offered us abundant gifts and love, Ignatius encourages us to respond by offering these gifts and this love back to God.  Rather than holding on desperately to what we have and using our gifts solely for our own benefit, by offering our gifts and ourselves back to God, we allow God to guide us and our gifts towards greater love and service for others.

Today, we celebrate the feast of Saint Stephen, the first Christian martyr.  In the reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we hear of Stephen’s gifts of preaching and “working great wonders and signs.”  What a wonderful example of someone who handed over his gifts so that the Holy Spirit could work through him!  Even in his final words, Stephen continues to offer himself to God.

During this Christmas season, as we continue to rejoice in gratitude for the wonderful gift of the Incarnation, maybe we can take some time to reflect on the many gifts we have received and offer them  to God.

—Thomas Bambrick, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic in First Studies, studying philosophy at Fordham University, New York.

Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty
my memory, my understanding
and my entire will,
all I have and
call my own.
You have given all to me
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours
do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and grace,
that is enough for me.

—St. Ignatius of Loyola

(Click here to download this prayer card.)

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty
my memory, my understanding
and my entire will,
all I have and
call my own.
You have given all to me
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours
do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and grace,
that is enough for me.

—St. Ignatius of Loyola

(Click here to download this prayer card.)

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Gift of Giving

All that I have and all that I am is a gift from God. All my talents and abilities, my family and friends, my experiences and growth, my life and faith—all these God has given to me. So, what should I do with all the gifts I have received?

At the end of the Spiritual Exercises, after having reflected on all the ways God has offered us abundant gifts and love, Ignatius encourages us to respond by offering these gifts and this love back to God.  Rather than holding on desperately to what we have and using our gifts solely for our own benefit, by offering our gifts and ourselves back to God, we allow God to guide us and our gifts towards greater love and service for others.

Today, we celebrate the feast of Saint Stephen, the first Christian martyr.  In the reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we hear of Stephen’s gifts of preaching and “working great wonders and signs.”  What a wonderful example of someone who handed over his gifts so that the Holy Spirit could work through him!  Even in his final words, Stephen continues to offer himself to God.

During this Christmas season, as we continue to rejoice in gratitude for the wonderful gift of the Incarnation, maybe we can take some time to reflect on the many gifts we have received and offer them  to God.

—Thomas Bambrick, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic in First Studies, studying philosophy at Fordham University, New York.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Stephen

Acts 6: 8-10; 7: 54-59

Stephen, full of grace and power, did great wonders and signs among the people. Then some of those who belonged to the synagogue of the Freedmen (as it was called), Cyrenians, Alexandrians, and others of those from Cilicia and Asia, stood up and argued with Stephen.  But they could not withstand the wisdom and the Spirit with which he spoke.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

December 26, 2013

St. Stephen

Acts 6: 8-10; 7: 54-59

Stephen, full of grace and power, did great wonders and signs among the people. Then some of those who belonged to the synagogue of the Freedmen (as it was called), Cyrenians, Alexandrians, and others of those from Cilicia and Asia, stood up and argued with Stephen.  But they could not withstand the wisdom and the Spirit with which he spoke.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Gift of Giving

All that I have and all that I am is a gift from God. All my talents and abilities, my family and friends, my experiences and growth, my life and faith—all these God has given to me. So, what should I do with all the gifts I have received?

At the end of the Spiritual Exercises, after having reflected on all the ways God has offered us abundant gifts and love, Ignatius encourages us to respond by offering these gifts and this love back to God.  Rather than holding on desperately to what we have and using our gifts solely for our own benefit, by offering our gifts and ourselves back to God, we allow God to guide us and our gifts towards greater love and service for others.

Today, we celebrate the feast of Saint Stephen, the first Christian martyr.  In the reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we hear of Stephen’s gifts of preaching and “working great wonders and signs.”  What a wonderful example of someone who handed over his gifts so that the Holy Spirit could work through him!  Even in his final words, Stephen continues to offer himself to God.

During this Christmas season, as we continue to rejoice in gratitude for the wonderful gift of the Incarnation, maybe we can take some time to reflect on the many gifts we have received and offer them  to God.

—Thomas Bambrick, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic in First Studies, studying philosophy at Fordham University, New York.

Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty
my memory, my understanding
and my entire will,
all I have and
call my own.
You have given all to me
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours
do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and grace,
that is enough for me.

—St. Ignatius of Loyola

(Click here to download this prayer card.)

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!