Prayer

Lord, to the unbeliever, the empty tomb symbolizes a world orphaned, drifting aimlessly, ruled by greed, power, and an ever-present evil. If indeed the unbeliever is right, nothing matters. Nothing! Lord, we stand before the tomb. With John we move inside. And we see “the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself.” And we see and believe.

Now that which seems pointless has purpose; that which seems impossible has potential; and no suffering, no disappointment, no struggle is meaningless. Life with all its warts and worries will one day be transcended because of the empty tomb, because of your Resurrection!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Relax in God’s Presence

“… We have seen it and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was made visible to us…

In the Cleveland Museum of Art there hangs a sculpture, “Christ and Saint John the Evangelist, 1300-1320.” Sr. Wendy Beckett featured this piece in her work sharing her love and appreciation of art. John is shown resting his head on Jesus’ shoulder at the Last Supper.  He would later witness Jesus dying and be entrusted to Mary and Mary to him.  We celebrate his feast day today. The fourth Gospel with which he and his community of believers are identified is the Gospel of Love. We are asked to love Jesus in His unity with the Creating Father so that we in turn experience God’s love through the Spirit and love as God loves.

How do we sit with the Mystery of the Holy Trinity? Who is this Word Incarnate?

I have found it helpful to pray the Examen before an image of this sculpture of John.   Relaxing into an awareness of God’s presence and indwelling, I ask for the grace to experience myself and others through Jesus’ loving, truthful eyes. Like John, I lean on Jesus and note where I have shared in the Creator’s labors, where I have recognized the Holy Spirit beckoning, and where I have been a disciple of Jesus, the Incarnate Word. I ask to experience myself in communion with God’s indwelling in all around me as well. Then I ask to see where I have fallen short. Jesus’ loving eyes and support help me here especially!  I entrust myself to Jesus and look forward to the remainder of the day.

—Janet Lehane is Assistant Director of the Spirituality Program for Adults at St. Ignatius High School, Cleveland OH.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. John

John 20: 1a and 2-8

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb.

The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

December 27, 2013

St. John

John 20: 1a and 2-8

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb.

The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Relax in God’s Presence

“… We have seen it and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was made visible to us…

In the Cleveland Museum of Art there hangs a sculpture, “Christ and Saint John the Evangelist, 1300-1320.” Sr. Wendy Beckett featured this piece in her work sharing her love and appreciation of art. John is shown resting his head on Jesus’ shoulder at the Last Supper.  He would later witness Jesus dying and be entrusted to Mary and Mary to him.  We celebrate his feast day today. The fourth Gospel with which he and his community of believers are identified is the Gospel of Love. We are asked to love Jesus in His unity with the Creating Father so that we in turn experience God’s love through the Spirit and love as God loves.

How do we sit with the Mystery of the Holy Trinity? Who is this Word Incarnate?

I have found it helpful to pray the Examen before an image of this sculpture of John.   Relaxing into an awareness of God’s presence and indwelling, I ask for the grace to experience myself and others through Jesus’ loving, truthful eyes. Like John, I lean on Jesus and note where I have shared in the Creator’s labors, where I have recognized the Holy Spirit beckoning, and where I have been a disciple of Jesus, the Incarnate Word. I ask to experience myself in communion with God’s indwelling in all around me as well. Then I ask to see where I have fallen short. Jesus’ loving eyes and support help me here especially!  I entrust myself to Jesus and look forward to the remainder of the day.

—Janet Lehane is Assistant Director of the Spirituality Program for Adults at St. Ignatius High School, Cleveland OH.

Prayer

Lord, to the unbeliever, the empty tomb symbolizes a world orphaned, drifting aimlessly, ruled by greed, power, and an ever-present evil. If indeed the unbeliever is right, nothing matters. Nothing! Lord, we stand before the tomb. With John we move inside. And we see “the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself.” And we see and believe.

Now that which seems pointless has purpose; that which seems impossible has potential; and no suffering, no disappointment, no struggle is meaningless. Life with all its warts and worries will one day be transcended because of the empty tomb, because of your Resurrection!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

Lord, to the unbeliever, the empty tomb symbolizes a world orphaned, drifting aimlessly, ruled by greed, power, and an ever-present evil. If indeed the unbeliever is right, nothing matters. Nothing! Lord, we stand before the tomb. With John we move inside. And we see “the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself.” And we see and believe.

Now that which seems pointless has purpose; that which seems impossible has potential; and no suffering, no disappointment, no struggle is meaningless. Life with all its warts and worries will one day be transcended because of the empty tomb, because of your Resurrection!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Relax in God’s Presence

“… We have seen it and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was made visible to us…

In the Cleveland Museum of Art there hangs a sculpture, “Christ and Saint John the Evangelist, 1300-1320.” Sr. Wendy Beckett featured this piece in her work sharing her love and appreciation of art. John is shown resting his head on Jesus’ shoulder at the Last Supper.  He would later witness Jesus dying and be entrusted to Mary and Mary to him.  We celebrate his feast day today. The fourth Gospel with which he and his community of believers are identified is the Gospel of Love. We are asked to love Jesus in His unity with the Creating Father so that we in turn experience God’s love through the Spirit and love as God loves.

How do we sit with the Mystery of the Holy Trinity? Who is this Word Incarnate?

I have found it helpful to pray the Examen before an image of this sculpture of John.   Relaxing into an awareness of God’s presence and indwelling, I ask for the grace to experience myself and others through Jesus’ loving, truthful eyes. Like John, I lean on Jesus and note where I have shared in the Creator’s labors, where I have recognized the Holy Spirit beckoning, and where I have been a disciple of Jesus, the Incarnate Word. I ask to experience myself in communion with God’s indwelling in all around me as well. Then I ask to see where I have fallen short. Jesus’ loving eyes and support help me here especially!  I entrust myself to Jesus and look forward to the remainder of the day.

—Janet Lehane is Assistant Director of the Spirituality Program for Adults at St. Ignatius High School, Cleveland OH.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. John

John 20: 1a and 2-8

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb.

The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

December 27, 2013

St. John

John 20: 1a and 2-8

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb.

The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Relax in God’s Presence

“… We have seen it and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was made visible to us…

In the Cleveland Museum of Art there hangs a sculpture, “Christ and Saint John the Evangelist, 1300-1320.” Sr. Wendy Beckett featured this piece in her work sharing her love and appreciation of art. John is shown resting his head on Jesus’ shoulder at the Last Supper.  He would later witness Jesus dying and be entrusted to Mary and Mary to him.  We celebrate his feast day today. The fourth Gospel with which he and his community of believers are identified is the Gospel of Love. We are asked to love Jesus in His unity with the Creating Father so that we in turn experience God’s love through the Spirit and love as God loves.

How do we sit with the Mystery of the Holy Trinity? Who is this Word Incarnate?

I have found it helpful to pray the Examen before an image of this sculpture of John.   Relaxing into an awareness of God’s presence and indwelling, I ask for the grace to experience myself and others through Jesus’ loving, truthful eyes. Like John, I lean on Jesus and note where I have shared in the Creator’s labors, where I have recognized the Holy Spirit beckoning, and where I have been a disciple of Jesus, the Incarnate Word. I ask to experience myself in communion with God’s indwelling in all around me as well. Then I ask to see where I have fallen short. Jesus’ loving eyes and support help me here especially!  I entrust myself to Jesus and look forward to the remainder of the day.

—Janet Lehane is Assistant Director of the Spirituality Program for Adults at St. Ignatius High School, Cleveland OH.

Prayer

Lord, to the unbeliever, the empty tomb symbolizes a world orphaned, drifting aimlessly, ruled by greed, power, and an ever-present evil. If indeed the unbeliever is right, nothing matters. Nothing! Lord, we stand before the tomb. With John we move inside. And we see “the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself.” And we see and believe.

Now that which seems pointless has purpose; that which seems impossible has potential; and no suffering, no disappointment, no struggle is meaningless. Life with all its warts and worries will one day be transcended because of the empty tomb, because of your Resurrection!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!