Prayer

The Lord is kind and merciful.

Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all my being bless God’s name: bless the Lord and forget not God’s benefits.

Merciful and gracious is our God: slow to anger and boundless in kindness.

—Psalm 103


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mercy and Law

Our readings today help us privilege mercy over law. So says the psalmist: “the Lord is kind and merciful”.

In today’s gospel the Pharisees present Jesus with a test of the Hebrew law: is it lawful for a husband to divorce his wife? While Jesus notes the law does provide for a man to divorce his wife, Jesus chooses a different path here. In the setting of Mark’s gospel, divorce would marginalize the wife to a life of poverty and shame. Rather than cite the law on its own merit, perhaps disconnected from particular context, Jesus prioritizes the greater good– care for the woman who would be impoverished, shamed, and marginalized by this action.

Jesus’ answer here is worth great consideration for us, in our own setting. Our newspapers are rife with this very same deliberation: law vs. mercy. And in my own life, in my own day, I encounter this same choice. What do I privilege when faced with the judgment between law and mercy, a choice I face in both obvious and subtle ways. Do I privilege what is outlined by law or custom, or is there a greater good I am missing, or a riskier choice I lack the courage to make? Lord, grant me the wisdom and strength to seek the greater good this day, which often supersedes the law and requires of me true religious faith.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 10: 1-12

He left that place and went to the region of Judea and beyond the Jordan. And crowds again gathered around him; and, as was his custom, he again taught them.

Some Pharisees came, and to test him they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”

Then in the house the disciples asked him again about this matter. He said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her; and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

February 28, 2014

Mark 10: 1-12

He left that place and went to the region of Judea and beyond the Jordan. And crowds again gathered around him; and, as was his custom, he again taught them.

Some Pharisees came, and to test him they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”

Then in the house the disciples asked him again about this matter. He said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her; and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Mercy and Law

Our readings today help us privilege mercy over law. So says the psalmist: “the Lord is kind and merciful”.

In today’s gospel the Pharisees present Jesus with a test of the Hebrew law: is it lawful for a husband to divorce his wife? While Jesus notes the law does provide for a man to divorce his wife, Jesus chooses a different path here. In the setting of Mark’s gospel, divorce would marginalize the wife to a life of poverty and shame. Rather than cite the law on its own merit, perhaps disconnected from particular context, Jesus prioritizes the greater good– care for the woman who would be impoverished, shamed, and marginalized by this action.

Jesus’ answer here is worth great consideration for us, in our own setting. Our newspapers are rife with this very same deliberation: law vs. mercy. And in my own life, in my own day, I encounter this same choice. What do I privilege when faced with the judgment between law and mercy, a choice I face in both obvious and subtle ways. Do I privilege what is outlined by law or custom, or is there a greater good I am missing, or a riskier choice I lack the courage to make? Lord, grant me the wisdom and strength to seek the greater good this day, which often supersedes the law and requires of me true religious faith.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

The Lord is kind and merciful.

Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all my being bless God’s name: bless the Lord and forget not God’s benefits.

Merciful and gracious is our God: slow to anger and boundless in kindness.

—Psalm 103


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord,  as Lent approaches, we anticipate our recommitment to be “living with one foot raised” ready to be your hope to others. We surrender all that we are to be filled with your Spirit so that when people meet us, they meet you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Attitudes and Actions

We are approaching the season of Lent. It is a time to center our hearts, to fix our eyes on Jesus, to live out his Word, to match our own actions to his life-giving deeds. Today’s readings engage us in frank talk about what this might look like.

“If your hand causes you to sin, cut it off…if your eye causes you to sin, pluck it out.” The truth is that our world view will have a greater sense of depth if we are seeing with both our eyes, and our physical actions throughout the day will be more balanced and effective if we can do them with two hands. It’s that same balanced view of reality that leads to effective spiritual health and grace-filled leadership in our professional and personal lives.

Today’s first reading from the letter of James points up the self-centered realities of life prevalent in Jesus’ day—realities certainly alive and well in our own experience. As I approach Mardi Gras weekend and the beginning of Lent, what kind of “course correction” to my attitudes and actions does Jesus ask and invite?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 9: 41-50

For truly I tell you, whoever gives you a cup of water to drink because you bear the name of Christ will by no means lose the reward.

“If any of you put a stumbling block before one of these little ones who believe in me, it would be better for you if a great millstone were hung around your neck and you were thrown into the sea. If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life maimed than to have two hands and to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire.

And if your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life lame than to have two feet and to be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to stumble, tear it out; it is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than to have two eyes and to be thrown into hell, where their worm never dies, and the fire is never quenched.

“For everyone will be salted with fire. Salt is good; but if salt has lost its saltiness, how can you season it? Have salt in yourselves, and be at peace with one another.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

February 27, 2014

Mark 9: 41-50

For truly I tell you, whoever gives you a cup of water to drink because you bear the name of Christ will by no means lose the reward.

“If any of you put a stumbling block before one of these little ones who believe in me, it would be better for you if a great millstone were hung around your neck and you were thrown into the sea. If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life maimed than to have two hands and to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire.

And if your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life lame than to have two feet and to be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to stumble, tear it out; it is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than to have two eyes and to be thrown into hell, where their worm never dies, and the fire is never quenched.

“For everyone will be salted with fire. Salt is good; but if salt has lost its saltiness, how can you season it? Have salt in yourselves, and be at peace with one another.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Attitudes and Actions

We are approaching the season of Lent. It is a time to center our hearts, to fix our eyes on Jesus, to live out his Word, to match our own actions to his life-giving deeds. Today’s readings engage us in frank talk about what this might look like.

“If your hand causes you to sin, cut it off…if your eye causes you to sin, pluck it out.” The truth is that our world view will have a greater sense of depth if we are seeing with both our eyes, and our physical actions throughout the day will be more balanced and effective if we can do them with two hands. It’s that same balanced view of reality that leads to effective spiritual health and grace-filled leadership in our professional and personal lives.

Today’s first reading from the letter of James points up the self-centered realities of life prevalent in Jesus’ day—realities certainly alive and well in our own experience. As I approach Mardi Gras weekend and the beginning of Lent, what kind of “course correction” to my attitudes and actions does Jesus ask and invite?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord,  as Lent approaches, we anticipate our recommitment to be “living with one foot raised” ready to be your hope to others. We surrender all that we are to be filled with your Spirit so that when people meet us, they meet you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, keep us deeply united to you. Help us overcome our conflicts, our divisions and our self-seeking, and to be united to one another by one force, by the power of love which the Holy Spirit pours into our hearts. Amen

— Excerpt from Pope Francis’ homily, January 25, 2014


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Children of God

When I was a young boy we were taught that if you were not Catholic, you could not go to heaven. I remember having a good friend who was not Catholic. When we argued and it came down to “fighting time,” he would run, and he was faster than me and my brothers. As he ran we would yell at him, “you’re not going to heaven because you’re not Catholic!” We were not very Christian to say the least! On the other hand, another childhood memory is of an uncle who was not Catholic, but was one of the kindest men I knew. How could he not be going to heaven?

In today’s gospel Jesus is telling us not to draw such lines. Rather, he encourages us to look at the results and be inclusive rather than exclusive. This makes sense to me. It is not an exclusive club to which we belong. It is the family of God. We are all children of God, created from his infinite love and called to the same love. Let’s be inclusive and assume the best in other people. Isn’t this the message Pope Francis has been teaching us this past year?

—David McNulty is the Provincial Assistant for Advancement, Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

The Lord is kind and merciful.

Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all my being bless God’s name: bless the Lord and forget not God’s benefits.

Merciful and gracious is our God: slow to anger and boundless in kindness.

—Psalm 103


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mercy and Law

Our readings today help us privilege mercy over law. So says the psalmist: “the Lord is kind and merciful”.

In today’s gospel the Pharisees present Jesus with a test of the Hebrew law: is it lawful for a husband to divorce his wife? While Jesus notes the law does provide for a man to divorce his wife, Jesus chooses a different path here. In the setting of Mark’s gospel, divorce would marginalize the wife to a life of poverty and shame. Rather than cite the law on its own merit, perhaps disconnected from particular context, Jesus prioritizes the greater good– care for the woman who would be impoverished, shamed, and marginalized by this action.

Jesus’ answer here is worth great consideration for us, in our own setting. Our newspapers are rife with this very same deliberation: law vs. mercy. And in my own life, in my own day, I encounter this same choice. What do I privilege when faced with the judgment between law and mercy, a choice I face in both obvious and subtle ways. Do I privilege what is outlined by law or custom, or is there a greater good I am missing, or a riskier choice I lack the courage to make? Lord, grant me the wisdom and strength to seek the greater good this day, which often supersedes the law and requires of me true religious faith.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 10: 1-12

He left that place and went to the region of Judea and beyond the Jordan. And crowds again gathered around him; and, as was his custom, he again taught them.

Some Pharisees came, and to test him they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”

Then in the house the disciples asked him again about this matter. He said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her; and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

February 28, 2014

Mark 10: 1-12

He left that place and went to the region of Judea and beyond the Jordan. And crowds again gathered around him; and, as was his custom, he again taught them.

Some Pharisees came, and to test him they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”

Then in the house the disciples asked him again about this matter. He said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her; and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Mercy and Law

Our readings today help us privilege mercy over law. So says the psalmist: “the Lord is kind and merciful”.

In today’s gospel the Pharisees present Jesus with a test of the Hebrew law: is it lawful for a husband to divorce his wife? While Jesus notes the law does provide for a man to divorce his wife, Jesus chooses a different path here. In the setting of Mark’s gospel, divorce would marginalize the wife to a life of poverty and shame. Rather than cite the law on its own merit, perhaps disconnected from particular context, Jesus prioritizes the greater good– care for the woman who would be impoverished, shamed, and marginalized by this action.

Jesus’ answer here is worth great consideration for us, in our own setting. Our newspapers are rife with this very same deliberation: law vs. mercy. And in my own life, in my own day, I encounter this same choice. What do I privilege when faced with the judgment between law and mercy, a choice I face in both obvious and subtle ways. Do I privilege what is outlined by law or custom, or is there a greater good I am missing, or a riskier choice I lack the courage to make? Lord, grant me the wisdom and strength to seek the greater good this day, which often supersedes the law and requires of me true religious faith.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

The Lord is kind and merciful.

Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all my being bless God’s name: bless the Lord and forget not God’s benefits.

Merciful and gracious is our God: slow to anger and boundless in kindness.

—Psalm 103


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord,  as Lent approaches, we anticipate our recommitment to be “living with one foot raised” ready to be your hope to others. We surrender all that we are to be filled with your Spirit so that when people meet us, they meet you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Attitudes and Actions

We are approaching the season of Lent. It is a time to center our hearts, to fix our eyes on Jesus, to live out his Word, to match our own actions to his life-giving deeds. Today’s readings engage us in frank talk about what this might look like.

“If your hand causes you to sin, cut it off…if your eye causes you to sin, pluck it out.” The truth is that our world view will have a greater sense of depth if we are seeing with both our eyes, and our physical actions throughout the day will be more balanced and effective if we can do them with two hands. It’s that same balanced view of reality that leads to effective spiritual health and grace-filled leadership in our professional and personal lives.

Today’s first reading from the letter of James points up the self-centered realities of life prevalent in Jesus’ day—realities certainly alive and well in our own experience. As I approach Mardi Gras weekend and the beginning of Lent, what kind of “course correction” to my attitudes and actions does Jesus ask and invite?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mark 9: 41-50

For truly I tell you, whoever gives you a cup of water to drink because you bear the name of Christ will by no means lose the reward.

“If any of you put a stumbling block before one of these little ones who believe in me, it would be better for you if a great millstone were hung around your neck and you were thrown into the sea. If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life maimed than to have two hands and to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire.

And if your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life lame than to have two feet and to be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to stumble, tear it out; it is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than to have two eyes and to be thrown into hell, where their worm never dies, and the fire is never quenched.

“For everyone will be salted with fire. Salt is good; but if salt has lost its saltiness, how can you season it? Have salt in yourselves, and be at peace with one another.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

February 27, 2014

Mark 9: 41-50

For truly I tell you, whoever gives you a cup of water to drink because you bear the name of Christ will by no means lose the reward.

“If any of you put a stumbling block before one of these little ones who believe in me, it would be better for you if a great millstone were hung around your neck and you were thrown into the sea. If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life maimed than to have two hands and to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire.

And if your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life lame than to have two feet and to be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to stumble, tear it out; it is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than to have two eyes and to be thrown into hell, where their worm never dies, and the fire is never quenched.

“For everyone will be salted with fire. Salt is good; but if salt has lost its saltiness, how can you season it? Have salt in yourselves, and be at peace with one another.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Attitudes and Actions

We are approaching the season of Lent. It is a time to center our hearts, to fix our eyes on Jesus, to live out his Word, to match our own actions to his life-giving deeds. Today’s readings engage us in frank talk about what this might look like.

“If your hand causes you to sin, cut it off…if your eye causes you to sin, pluck it out.” The truth is that our world view will have a greater sense of depth if we are seeing with both our eyes, and our physical actions throughout the day will be more balanced and effective if we can do them with two hands. It’s that same balanced view of reality that leads to effective spiritual health and grace-filled leadership in our professional and personal lives.

Today’s first reading from the letter of James points up the self-centered realities of life prevalent in Jesus’ day—realities certainly alive and well in our own experience. As I approach Mardi Gras weekend and the beginning of Lent, what kind of “course correction” to my attitudes and actions does Jesus ask and invite?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord,  as Lent approaches, we anticipate our recommitment to be “living with one foot raised” ready to be your hope to others. We surrender all that we are to be filled with your Spirit so that when people meet us, they meet you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, keep us deeply united to you. Help us overcome our conflicts, our divisions and our self-seeking, and to be united to one another by one force, by the power of love which the Holy Spirit pours into our hearts. Amen

— Excerpt from Pope Francis’ homily, January 25, 2014


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Children of God

When I was a young boy we were taught that if you were not Catholic, you could not go to heaven. I remember having a good friend who was not Catholic. When we argued and it came down to “fighting time,” he would run, and he was faster than me and my brothers. As he ran we would yell at him, “you’re not going to heaven because you’re not Catholic!” We were not very Christian to say the least! On the other hand, another childhood memory is of an uncle who was not Catholic, but was one of the kindest men I knew. How could he not be going to heaven?

In today’s gospel Jesus is telling us not to draw such lines. Rather, he encourages us to look at the results and be inclusive rather than exclusive. This makes sense to me. It is not an exclusive club to which we belong. It is the family of God. We are all children of God, created from his infinite love and called to the same love. Let’s be inclusive and assume the best in other people. Isn’t this the message Pope Francis has been teaching us this past year?

—David McNulty is the Provincial Assistant for Advancement, Chicago-Detroit Province Jesuits


Please share the Good Word with your friends!