Today’s Ignatian Message

I beg of you, my Lord, to remove anything which separates me from you, and you from me. —St. Peter Faber, SJ


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 2, 2014

Jer 26: 11-16. 24

Then the priests and the prophets said to the officials and to all the people, “This man deserves the sentence of death because he has prophesied against this city, as you have heard with your own ears.” Then Jeremiah spoke to all the officials and all the people, saying, “It is the Lord who sent me to prophesy against this house and this city all the words you have heard. Now therefore amend your ways and your doings, and obey the voice of the Lord your God, and the Lord will change his mind about the disaster that he has pronounced against you.

But as for me, here I am in your hands. Do with me as seems good and right to you. Only know for certain that if you put me to death, you will be bringing innocent blood upon yourselves and upon this city and its inhabitants, for in truth the Lord sent me to you to speak all these words in your ears.”

Then the officials and all the people said to the priests and the prophets, “This man does not deserve the sentence of death, for he has spoken to us in the name of the Lord our God.” But the hand of Ahikam son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah so that he was not given over into the hands of the people to be put to death.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

A Friend in the Lord

In today’s first reading Jeremiah says words, which suit our saint of the day (just declared such by Pope Francis, on December 17, 2013): “It was the Lord, who sent me to you.”  Peter Faber was born on April 13, 1506, in Savoy in southeastern France, where France, Italy and Switzerland come together in the Alps.  He was a shepherd, as a boy, but a very smart and intelligent one, with a phenomenal memory.  It is said that he could hear a sermon once and repeat it, word for word.

He had a winning personality, and he was known to be cordial, elegant and learned, especially with regard to Sacred Scripture.  He was a roommate of Francis Xavier at the University of Paris, when Ignatius joined them. These three were the key players in the founding of the Society (or Company, as they preferred to call it) of Jesus.  While Ignatius would spend 26 years in a small set of rooms in Rome, writing the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and some 70,000 letters pertaining to spiritual direction and governance, Xavier would spend ten years crisscrossing the Far East, and Faber ten years, crisscrossing Europe trying to heal the wounds of the Reformation.

For me Faber is a model as a genuine ecumenist, treating the Protestants with great respect, even though he disagreed with them theologically.

—Fr. Robert Braunreuther, S.J., a Jesuit of the New England province, assists in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago, where he is also minister of the Arrupe House Jesuit community.

Prayer

I beg of you, my Lord,
to remove anything which separates
me from you, and you from me.
Remove anything that makes me unworthy
of your sight, your control, your reprehension;
of your speech and conversation,
of your benevolence and love.

Cast from me every evil
that stands in the way of my seeing you,
hearing, tasting, savoring, and touching you;
fearing and being mindful of you;
knowing, trusting, loving, and possessing you;
being conscious of your presence
and, as far as may be, enjoying you.
This is what I ask for myself
and earnestly desire from you. Amen.

—St. Peter Faber, S.J., Prayer of Detachment


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

A Friend in the Lord

In today’s first reading Jeremiah says words, which suit our saint of the day (just declared such by Pope Francis, on December 17, 2013): “It was the Lord, who sent me to you.” Peter Faber was born on April 13, 1506, in Savoy in southeastern France, where France, Italy and Switzerland come together in the Alps. He was a shepherd, as a boy, but a very smart and intelligent one, with a phenomenal memory. It is said that he could hear a sermon once and repeat it, word for word.

He had a winning personality, and he was known to be cordial, elegant and learned, especially with regard to Sacred Scripture. He was a roommate of Francis Xavier at the University of Paris, when Ignatius joined them. These three were the key players in the founding of the Society (or Company, as they preferred to call it) of Jesus. While Ignatius would spend 26 years in a small set of rooms in Rome, writing the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and some 70,000 letters pertaining to spiritual direction and governance, Xavier would spend ten years crisscrossing the Far East, and Faber ten years, crisscrossing Europe trying to heal the wounds of the Reformation.

For me Faber is a model as a genuine ecumenist, treating the Protestants with great respect, even though he disagreed with them theologically.

—Fr. Robert Braunreuther, S.J., a Jesuit of the New England province, assists in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago, where he is also minister of the Arrupe House Jesuit community.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Jer 26: 11-16. 24

Then the priests and the prophets said to the officials and to all the people, “This man deserves the sentence of death because he has prophesied against this city, as you have heard with your own ears.” Then Jeremiah spoke to all the officials and all the people, saying, “It is the Lord who sent me to prophesy against this house and this city all the words you have heard. Now therefore amend your ways and your doings, and obey the voice of the Lord your God, and the Lord will change his mind about the disaster that he has pronounced against you.

But as for me, here I am in your hands. Do with me as seems good and right to you. Only know for certain that if you put me to death, you will be bringing innocent blood upon yourselves and upon this city and its inhabitants, for in truth the Lord sent me to you to speak all these words in your ears.”

Then the officials and all the people said to the priests and the prophets, “This man does not deserve the sentence of death, for he has spoken to us in the name of the Lord our God.” But the hand of Ahikam son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah so that he was not given over into the hands of the people to be put to death.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

I beg of you, my Lord,
to remove anything which separates
me from you, and you from me.
Remove anything that makes me unworthy
of your sight, your control, your reprehension;
of your speech and conversation,
of your benevolence and love.

Cast from me every evil
that stands in the way of my seeing you,
hearing, tasting, savoring, and touching you;
fearing and being mindful of you;
knowing, trusting, loving, and possessing you;
being conscious of your presence
and, as far as may be, enjoying you.
This is what I ask for myself
and earnestly desire from you. Amen.

—St. Peter Faber, S.J., Prayer of Detachment


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Today’s Ignatian Message

I beg of you, my Lord, to remove anything which separates me from you, and you from me. —St. Peter Faber, SJ


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 2, 2014

Jer 26: 11-16. 24

Then the priests and the prophets said to the officials and to all the people, “This man deserves the sentence of death because he has prophesied against this city, as you have heard with your own ears.” Then Jeremiah spoke to all the officials and all the people, saying, “It is the Lord who sent me to prophesy against this house and this city all the words you have heard. Now therefore amend your ways and your doings, and obey the voice of the Lord your God, and the Lord will change his mind about the disaster that he has pronounced against you.

But as for me, here I am in your hands. Do with me as seems good and right to you. Only know for certain that if you put me to death, you will be bringing innocent blood upon yourselves and upon this city and its inhabitants, for in truth the Lord sent me to you to speak all these words in your ears.”

Then the officials and all the people said to the priests and the prophets, “This man does not deserve the sentence of death, for he has spoken to us in the name of the Lord our God.” But the hand of Ahikam son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah so that he was not given over into the hands of the people to be put to death.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

A Friend in the Lord

In today’s first reading Jeremiah says words, which suit our saint of the day (just declared such by Pope Francis, on December 17, 2013): “It was the Lord, who sent me to you.”  Peter Faber was born on April 13, 1506, in Savoy in southeastern France, where France, Italy and Switzerland come together in the Alps.  He was a shepherd, as a boy, but a very smart and intelligent one, with a phenomenal memory.  It is said that he could hear a sermon once and repeat it, word for word.

He had a winning personality, and he was known to be cordial, elegant and learned, especially with regard to Sacred Scripture.  He was a roommate of Francis Xavier at the University of Paris, when Ignatius joined them. These three were the key players in the founding of the Society (or Company, as they preferred to call it) of Jesus.  While Ignatius would spend 26 years in a small set of rooms in Rome, writing the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and some 70,000 letters pertaining to spiritual direction and governance, Xavier would spend ten years crisscrossing the Far East, and Faber ten years, crisscrossing Europe trying to heal the wounds of the Reformation.

For me Faber is a model as a genuine ecumenist, treating the Protestants with great respect, even though he disagreed with them theologically.

—Fr. Robert Braunreuther, S.J., a Jesuit of the New England province, assists in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago, where he is also minister of the Arrupe House Jesuit community.

Prayer

I beg of you, my Lord,
to remove anything which separates
me from you, and you from me.
Remove anything that makes me unworthy
of your sight, your control, your reprehension;
of your speech and conversation,
of your benevolence and love.

Cast from me every evil
that stands in the way of my seeing you,
hearing, tasting, savoring, and touching you;
fearing and being mindful of you;
knowing, trusting, loving, and possessing you;
being conscious of your presence
and, as far as may be, enjoying you.
This is what I ask for myself
and earnestly desire from you. Amen.

—St. Peter Faber, S.J., Prayer of Detachment


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

A Friend in the Lord

In today’s first reading Jeremiah says words, which suit our saint of the day (just declared such by Pope Francis, on December 17, 2013): “It was the Lord, who sent me to you.” Peter Faber was born on April 13, 1506, in Savoy in southeastern France, where France, Italy and Switzerland come together in the Alps. He was a shepherd, as a boy, but a very smart and intelligent one, with a phenomenal memory. It is said that he could hear a sermon once and repeat it, word for word.

He had a winning personality, and he was known to be cordial, elegant and learned, especially with regard to Sacred Scripture. He was a roommate of Francis Xavier at the University of Paris, when Ignatius joined them. These three were the key players in the founding of the Society (or Company, as they preferred to call it) of Jesus. While Ignatius would spend 26 years in a small set of rooms in Rome, writing the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and some 70,000 letters pertaining to spiritual direction and governance, Xavier would spend ten years crisscrossing the Far East, and Faber ten years, crisscrossing Europe trying to heal the wounds of the Reformation.

For me Faber is a model as a genuine ecumenist, treating the Protestants with great respect, even though he disagreed with them theologically.

—Fr. Robert Braunreuther, S.J., a Jesuit of the New England province, assists in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago, where he is also minister of the Arrupe House Jesuit community.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Jer 26: 11-16. 24

Then the priests and the prophets said to the officials and to all the people, “This man deserves the sentence of death because he has prophesied against this city, as you have heard with your own ears.” Then Jeremiah spoke to all the officials and all the people, saying, “It is the Lord who sent me to prophesy against this house and this city all the words you have heard. Now therefore amend your ways and your doings, and obey the voice of the Lord your God, and the Lord will change his mind about the disaster that he has pronounced against you.

But as for me, here I am in your hands. Do with me as seems good and right to you. Only know for certain that if you put me to death, you will be bringing innocent blood upon yourselves and upon this city and its inhabitants, for in truth the Lord sent me to you to speak all these words in your ears.”

Then the officials and all the people said to the priests and the prophets, “This man does not deserve the sentence of death, for he has spoken to us in the name of the Lord our God.” But the hand of Ahikam son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah so that he was not given over into the hands of the people to be put to death.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

I beg of you, my Lord,
to remove anything which separates
me from you, and you from me.
Remove anything that makes me unworthy
of your sight, your control, your reprehension;
of your speech and conversation,
of your benevolence and love.

Cast from me every evil
that stands in the way of my seeing you,
hearing, tasting, savoring, and touching you;
fearing and being mindful of you;
knowing, trusting, loving, and possessing you;
being conscious of your presence
and, as far as may be, enjoying you.
This is what I ask for myself
and earnestly desire from you. Amen.

—St. Peter Faber, S.J., Prayer of Detachment


Please share the Good Word with your friends!