Today’s Ignatian Message

I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 18, 2014

Mt 19: 16-22

Then someone came to him and said, “Teacher, what good deed must I do to have eternal life?” And he said to him, “Why do you ask me about what is good? There is only one who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.” He said to him, “Which ones?” And Jesus said, “You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; Honor your father and mother; also, You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

The young man said to him, “I have kept all these; what do I still lack?” Jesus said to him, “If you wish to be perfect, go, sell your possessions, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When the young man heard this word, he went away grieving, for he had many possessions.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Come, Follow Me

The story of the rich young man is haunting, particularly for those of us who like to follow rules and earn our way to the top. We are stunned to find someone who chooses checklists over grace and possessions over accepting Jesus’ personal invitation to “come, follow me.” But are we really all that different?

Ignatius of Loyola, himself a rich young man at the time of his conversion from courtier to companion of Jesus, struggled with the very same issues. Having received the graces of revelation, faith, and prayer, he developed the Spiritual Exercises to help us be open to the same graces in our lives. Ignatius’s “First Principle and Foundation,” which begins the Exercises, offers an ideal reflection for today:

The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God’s life to flow into us without limit.

All the things in this world are gifts of God, presented to us so that we can know God more easily and make a return of love more readily.

As a result, we appreciate and use all these gifts of God insofar as they help us develop as loving persons. But if any of these gifts become the center of our lives, they displace God and so hinder our growth toward our goal.

In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of these created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or short one. For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God.

Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

—St. Ignatius, as paraphrased by David Fleming, SJ. Click here for prayer card.

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for theMidwest Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA

Prayer

Lord, today may I only make choices based on what better leads to you deepening your life in me.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Come, Follow Me

The story of the rich young man is haunting, particularly for those of us who like to follow rules and earn our way to the top. We are stunned to find someone who chooses checklists over grace and possessions over accepting Jesus’ personal invitation to “come, follow me.” But are we really all that different?

Ignatius of Loyola, himself a rich young man at the time of his conversion from courtier to companion of Jesus, struggled with the very same issues. Having received the graces of revelation, faith, and prayer, he developed the Spiritual Exercises to help us be open to the same graces in our lives. Ignatius’s “First Principle and Foundation,” which begins the Exercises, offers an ideal reflection for today:

The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God’s life to flow into us without limit.

All the things in this world are gifts of God, presented to us so that we can know God more easily and make a return of love more readily.

As a result, we appreciate and use all these gifts of God insofar as they help us develop as loving persons. But if any of these gifts become the center of our lives, they displace God and so hinder our growth toward our goal.

In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of these created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or short one. For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God.

Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

—St. Ignatius, as paraphrased by David Fleming, SJ. Click here for prayer card.

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for theMidwest Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mt 19: 16-22

Then someone came to him and said, “Teacher, what good deed must I do to have eternal life?” And he said to him, “Why do you ask me about what is good? There is only one who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.” He said to him, “Which ones?” And Jesus said, “You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; Honor your father and mother; also, You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

The young man said to him, “I have kept all these; what do I still lack?” Jesus said to him, “If you wish to be perfect, go, sell your possessions, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When the young man heard this word, he went away grieving, for he had many possessions.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, today may I only make choices based on what better leads to you deepening your life in me.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


Get our FREE App

Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
22232425262728
293031    
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
    123
45678910
       
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

Today’s Ignatian Message

I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

August 18, 2014

Mt 19: 16-22

Then someone came to him and said, “Teacher, what good deed must I do to have eternal life?” And he said to him, “Why do you ask me about what is good? There is only one who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.” He said to him, “Which ones?” And Jesus said, “You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; Honor your father and mother; also, You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

The young man said to him, “I have kept all these; what do I still lack?” Jesus said to him, “If you wish to be perfect, go, sell your possessions, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When the young man heard this word, he went away grieving, for he had many possessions.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Come, Follow Me

The story of the rich young man is haunting, particularly for those of us who like to follow rules and earn our way to the top. We are stunned to find someone who chooses checklists over grace and possessions over accepting Jesus’ personal invitation to “come, follow me.” But are we really all that different?

Ignatius of Loyola, himself a rich young man at the time of his conversion from courtier to companion of Jesus, struggled with the very same issues. Having received the graces of revelation, faith, and prayer, he developed the Spiritual Exercises to help us be open to the same graces in our lives. Ignatius’s “First Principle and Foundation,” which begins the Exercises, offers an ideal reflection for today:

The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God’s life to flow into us without limit.

All the things in this world are gifts of God, presented to us so that we can know God more easily and make a return of love more readily.

As a result, we appreciate and use all these gifts of God insofar as they help us develop as loving persons. But if any of these gifts become the center of our lives, they displace God and so hinder our growth toward our goal.

In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of these created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or short one. For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God.

Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

—St. Ignatius, as paraphrased by David Fleming, SJ. Click here for prayer card.

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for theMidwest Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA

Prayer

Lord, today may I only make choices based on what better leads to you deepening your life in me.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Come, Follow Me

The story of the rich young man is haunting, particularly for those of us who like to follow rules and earn our way to the top. We are stunned to find someone who chooses checklists over grace and possessions over accepting Jesus’ personal invitation to “come, follow me.” But are we really all that different?

Ignatius of Loyola, himself a rich young man at the time of his conversion from courtier to companion of Jesus, struggled with the very same issues. Having received the graces of revelation, faith, and prayer, he developed the Spiritual Exercises to help us be open to the same graces in our lives. Ignatius’s “First Principle and Foundation,” which begins the Exercises, offers an ideal reflection for today:

The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God’s life to flow into us without limit.

All the things in this world are gifts of God, presented to us so that we can know God more easily and make a return of love more readily.

As a result, we appreciate and use all these gifts of God insofar as they help us develop as loving persons. But if any of these gifts become the center of our lives, they displace God and so hinder our growth toward our goal.

In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of these created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or short one. For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God.

Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

—St. Ignatius, as paraphrased by David Fleming, SJ. Click here for prayer card.

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for theMidwest Jesuits and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mt 19: 16-22

Then someone came to him and said, “Teacher, what good deed must I do to have eternal life?” And he said to him, “Why do you ask me about what is good? There is only one who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.” He said to him, “Which ones?” And Jesus said, “You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; Honor your father and mother; also, You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

The young man said to him, “I have kept all these; what do I still lack?” Jesus said to him, “If you wish to be perfect, go, sell your possessions, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When the young man heard this word, he went away grieving, for he had many possessions.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, today may I only make choices based on what better leads to you deepening your life in me.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!