September 30, 2014

St. Jerome

Jb 3: 1-3. 11-17

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth. Job said:“Let the day perish in which I was born, and the night that said, ‘A man-child is conceived.’

“Why did I not die at birth, come forth from the womb and expire? Why were there knees to receive me, or breasts for me to suck? Now I would be lying down and quiet; I would be asleep; then I would be at rest with kings and counselors of the earth who rebuild ruins for themselves, or with princes who have gold, who fill their houses with silver. Or why was I not buried like a stillborn child, like an infant that never sees the light? There the wicked cease from troubling, and there the weary are at rest.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Daring and Bold Statement

According to one of the earliest Jesuits, Jerome Nadal, the origins of the Society of Jesus are found in the meditation on the two standards.  In this meditation from Ignatius´ Spiritual Exercises, the retreatant is asked to pray for the grace to be able to discern where Christ is acting in the world and where the evil spirit is acting.  As we know from our own experience, this discernment is harder than it first appears.

To say then that the Society of Jesus was born in this meditation is a daring and bold statement.  Nadal is suggesting that our Ignatian charisma is found in our service and love of others in situations where we cannot easily see Jesus´ presence.

As we hear then Job´s complaint and the vindictive anger of James and John, let us pray for the grace to be in these challenging, human places in our lives.

—Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic of the Chicago-Detroit province. He is currently in his second year of theology studies at the Jesuit house of studies in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.  Chris previously taught at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL.

Prayer

O Lord, show Your mercy to me and gladden my heart. I am like the man on the way to Jericho who was overtaken by robbers, wounded and left for dead. O Good Samaritan, come to my aid. I am like the sheep that went astray. O Good Shepherd, seek me out and bring me home in accord with Your will. Let me dwell in Your house all the days of my life and praise You for ever and ever with those who are there. Amen.

—A Prayer of Saint Jerome for Christ’s Mercy


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Daring and Bold Statement

According to one of the earliest Jesuits, Jerome Nadal, the origins of the Society of Jesus are found in the meditation on the two standards. In this meditation from Ignatius´ Spiritual Exercises, the retreatant is asked to pray for the grace to be able to discern where Christ is acting in the world and where the evil spirit is acting. As we know from our own experience, this discernment is harder than it first appears.

To say then that the Society of Jesus was born in this meditation is a daring and bold statement. Nadal is suggesting that our Ignatian charisma is found in our service and love of others in situations where we cannot easily see Jesus´ presence.

As we hear then Job´s complaint and the vindictive anger of James and John, let us pray for the grace to be in these challenging, human places in our lives.

—Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic of the Chicago-Detroit province. He is currently in his second year of theology studies at the Jesuit house of studies in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Chris previously taught at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Jerome

Jb 3: 1-3. 11-17

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth. Job said:“Let the day perish in which I was born, and the night that said, ‘A man-child is conceived.’

“Why did I not die at birth, come forth from the womb and expire? Why were there knees to receive me, or breasts for me to suck? Now I would be lying down and quiet; I would be asleep; then I would be at rest with kings and counselors of the earth who rebuild ruins for themselves, or with princes who have gold, who fill their houses with silver. Or why was I not buried like a stillborn child, like an infant that never sees the light? There the wicked cease from troubling, and there the weary are at rest.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

O Lord, show Your mercy to me and gladden my heart. I am like the man on the way to Jericho who was overtaken by robbers, wounded and left for dead. O Good Samaritan, come to my aid. I am like the sheep that went astray. O Good Shepherd, seek me out and bring me home in accord with Your will. Let me dwell in Your house all the days of my life and praise You for ever and ever with those who are there. Amen.

—A Prayer of Saint Jerome for Christ’s Mercy


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 29, 2014

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel & Raphael

John 1: 47-51

Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him and said of him, “Here is a true child of Israel. There is no duplicity in him.” Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, I saw you under the fig tree.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.”

Jesus answered and said to him, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this.” And he said to him, “Amen, amen, I say to you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

An Affair of the Heart

When Jesus sees Nathanael coming toward him he calls him a “true child of Israel.”  We do not know why Jesus has this strong reaction to Nathanael. We know that Nathanael was sitting under a fig tree, but we don’t know what he was doing. We know that Philip approached him, although we don’t know why, and that Nathanael accepted his invitation to see who it was from Nazareth that was fulfillment of the law and prophets. We also know that Nathanael says the “right things” in response to meeting Jesus.

What was it about Nathanael—about who he was, about his faith, about whatever he was doing under the fig tree—that warranted Jesus’ reaction to seeing him and also the inclusion of this story in the Gospel of John? One possibility is that Jesus knew Nathanael’s heart and spirit and had known him since his own beginning. That fact and Nathanael’s curiosity and openness to the One who Phillip wanted him to see results in Jesus’ reaction.

This begs the question—what would Jesus’ reaction be if he saw me today? What would I be doing? Would I go with Phillip? What would Jesus sense of my being, my heart, my spirit be? Jesus has known me my whole life, so would the trajectory of my being and becoming warrant a similar reaction?

—Elizabeth Collier has degrees from three different Jesuit universities, including a PhD in Christian Ethics from Loyola University Chicago. She teaches at Dominican University in River Forest, IL.

Prayer

Mother, help our faith! Open our ears to hear God’s word and to recognize his voice and call.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel; Raphael

John 1: 47-51

Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him and said of him, “Here is a true child of Israel. There is no duplicity in him.” Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, I saw you under the fig tree.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.”

Jesus answered and said to him, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this.” And he said to him, “Amen, amen, I say to you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Mother, help our faith! Open our ears to hear God’s word and to recognize his voice and call.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

An Affair of the Heart

When Jesus sees Nathanael coming toward him he calls him a “true child of Israel.”  We do not know why Jesus has this strong reaction to Nathanael. We know that Nathanael was sitting under a fig tree, but we don’t know what he was doing. We know that Philip approached him, although we don’t know why, and that Nathanael accepted his invitation to see who it was from Nazareth that was fulfillment of the law and prophets. We also know that Nathanael says the “right things” in response to meeting Jesus.

What was it about Nathanael—about who he was, about his faith, about whatever he was doing under the fig tree—that warranted Jesus’ reaction to seeing him and also the inclusion of this story in the Gospel of John? One possibility is that Jesus knew Nathanael’s heart and spirit and had known him since his own beginning. That fact and Nathanael’s curiosity and openness to the One who Phillip wanted him to see results in Jesus’ reaction.

This begs the question—what would Jesus’ reaction be if he saw me today? What would I be doing? Would I go with Phillip? What would Jesus sense of my being, my heart, my spirit be? Jesus has known me my whole life, so would the trajectory of my being and becoming warrant a similar reaction?

—Elizabeth Collier has degrees from three different Jesuit universities, including a PhD in Christian Ethics from Loyola University Chicago. She teaches at Dominican University in River Forest, IL.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 28, 2014

Matthew 21: 28-32

“What do you think? A man had two sons; he went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work in the vineyard today.’ He answered, ‘I will not’; but later he changed his mind and went. The father went to the second and said the same; and he answered, ‘I go, sir’; but he did not go. Which of the two did the will of his father?” They said, “The first.”

Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are going into the kingdom of God ahead of you. For John came to you in the way of righteousness and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him; and even after you saw it, you did not change your minds and believe him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Alive for the Kingdom

Once after reading an auto repair shop’s mission statement a thousand times while waiting in line, I told the manager that, given their performance, the statement could have been reduced to one word: “whatever.” Writing a mission statement is easy; there are even “mission statement templates.” Doing the mission is the challenge.

Similarly, as individuals we can’t be content with lives marked only by our good intentions. When Jesus told his audience that “Tax collectors and prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God before you,” it was a wake-up call. Contentment with intention without action keeps us lounging comfortably on the couches of our lives, keeps us from giving ourselves fully to God’s exciting project.

James Brown sang, “Get up offa that thing, and dance ’til you feel better.” Let’s do just that. Let’s leave our metaphorical couches and get out on the dance floor with Jesus.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is a professor of education and Rector of the Jesuit community at John Carroll University, University Heights OH.

Prayer

Giver of life, Creator of all that is lovely,
Teach me to sing the words of your song;
I want to feel the music of living
And not fear the sad songs,
But from them make new songs
Composed of both laughter and tears.
Teach me to dance to the sounds of your
world and your people,
I want to move in rhythm with your plan;
Help me to try to follow your leading,
To risk even falling,
To rise and keep trying
Because you are leading the dance.

— Dancer’s Prayer,  Anonymous

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Alive for the Kingdom

Once after reading an auto repair shop’s mission statement a thousand times while waiting in line, I told the manager that, given their performance, the statement could have been reduced to one word: “whatever.” Writing a mission statement is easy; there are even “mission statement templates.” Doing the mission is the challenge.

Similarly, as individuals we can’t be content with lives marked only by our good intentions. When Jesus told his audience that “Tax collectors and prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God before you,” it was a wake-up call. Contentment with intention without action keeps us lounging comfortably on the couches of our lives, keeps us from giving ourselves fully to God’s exciting project.

James Brown sang, “Get up offa that thing, and dance ’til you feel better.” Let’s do just that. Let’s leave our metaphorical couches and get out on the dance floor with Jesus.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is a professor of education and Rector of the Jesuit community at John Carroll University, University Heights OH.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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September 30, 2014

St. Jerome

Jb 3: 1-3. 11-17

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth. Job said:“Let the day perish in which I was born, and the night that said, ‘A man-child is conceived.’

“Why did I not die at birth, come forth from the womb and expire? Why were there knees to receive me, or breasts for me to suck? Now I would be lying down and quiet; I would be asleep; then I would be at rest with kings and counselors of the earth who rebuild ruins for themselves, or with princes who have gold, who fill their houses with silver. Or why was I not buried like a stillborn child, like an infant that never sees the light? There the wicked cease from troubling, and there the weary are at rest.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Daring and Bold Statement

According to one of the earliest Jesuits, Jerome Nadal, the origins of the Society of Jesus are found in the meditation on the two standards.  In this meditation from Ignatius´ Spiritual Exercises, the retreatant is asked to pray for the grace to be able to discern where Christ is acting in the world and where the evil spirit is acting.  As we know from our own experience, this discernment is harder than it first appears.

To say then that the Society of Jesus was born in this meditation is a daring and bold statement.  Nadal is suggesting that our Ignatian charisma is found in our service and love of others in situations where we cannot easily see Jesus´ presence.

As we hear then Job´s complaint and the vindictive anger of James and John, let us pray for the grace to be in these challenging, human places in our lives.

—Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic of the Chicago-Detroit province. He is currently in his second year of theology studies at the Jesuit house of studies in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.  Chris previously taught at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL.

Prayer

O Lord, show Your mercy to me and gladden my heart. I am like the man on the way to Jericho who was overtaken by robbers, wounded and left for dead. O Good Samaritan, come to my aid. I am like the sheep that went astray. O Good Shepherd, seek me out and bring me home in accord with Your will. Let me dwell in Your house all the days of my life and praise You for ever and ever with those who are there. Amen.

—A Prayer of Saint Jerome for Christ’s Mercy


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Daring and Bold Statement

According to one of the earliest Jesuits, Jerome Nadal, the origins of the Society of Jesus are found in the meditation on the two standards. In this meditation from Ignatius´ Spiritual Exercises, the retreatant is asked to pray for the grace to be able to discern where Christ is acting in the world and where the evil spirit is acting. As we know from our own experience, this discernment is harder than it first appears.

To say then that the Society of Jesus was born in this meditation is a daring and bold statement. Nadal is suggesting that our Ignatian charisma is found in our service and love of others in situations where we cannot easily see Jesus´ presence.

As we hear then Job´s complaint and the vindictive anger of James and John, let us pray for the grace to be in these challenging, human places in our lives.

—Christopher Staab, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic of the Chicago-Detroit province. He is currently in his second year of theology studies at the Jesuit house of studies in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Chris previously taught at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago IL.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Jerome

Jb 3: 1-3. 11-17

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth. Job said:“Let the day perish in which I was born, and the night that said, ‘A man-child is conceived.’

“Why did I not die at birth, come forth from the womb and expire? Why were there knees to receive me, or breasts for me to suck? Now I would be lying down and quiet; I would be asleep; then I would be at rest with kings and counselors of the earth who rebuild ruins for themselves, or with princes who have gold, who fill their houses with silver. Or why was I not buried like a stillborn child, like an infant that never sees the light? There the wicked cease from troubling, and there the weary are at rest.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

O Lord, show Your mercy to me and gladden my heart. I am like the man on the way to Jericho who was overtaken by robbers, wounded and left for dead. O Good Samaritan, come to my aid. I am like the sheep that went astray. O Good Shepherd, seek me out and bring me home in accord with Your will. Let me dwell in Your house all the days of my life and praise You for ever and ever with those who are there. Amen.

—A Prayer of Saint Jerome for Christ’s Mercy


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 29, 2014

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel & Raphael

John 1: 47-51

Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him and said of him, “Here is a true child of Israel. There is no duplicity in him.” Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, I saw you under the fig tree.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.”

Jesus answered and said to him, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this.” And he said to him, “Amen, amen, I say to you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

An Affair of the Heart

When Jesus sees Nathanael coming toward him he calls him a “true child of Israel.”  We do not know why Jesus has this strong reaction to Nathanael. We know that Nathanael was sitting under a fig tree, but we don’t know what he was doing. We know that Philip approached him, although we don’t know why, and that Nathanael accepted his invitation to see who it was from Nazareth that was fulfillment of the law and prophets. We also know that Nathanael says the “right things” in response to meeting Jesus.

What was it about Nathanael—about who he was, about his faith, about whatever he was doing under the fig tree—that warranted Jesus’ reaction to seeing him and also the inclusion of this story in the Gospel of John? One possibility is that Jesus knew Nathanael’s heart and spirit and had known him since his own beginning. That fact and Nathanael’s curiosity and openness to the One who Phillip wanted him to see results in Jesus’ reaction.

This begs the question—what would Jesus’ reaction be if he saw me today? What would I be doing? Would I go with Phillip? What would Jesus sense of my being, my heart, my spirit be? Jesus has known me my whole life, so would the trajectory of my being and becoming warrant a similar reaction?

—Elizabeth Collier has degrees from three different Jesuit universities, including a PhD in Christian Ethics from Loyola University Chicago. She teaches at Dominican University in River Forest, IL.

Prayer

Mother, help our faith! Open our ears to hear God’s word and to recognize his voice and call.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel; Raphael

John 1: 47-51

Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him and said of him, “Here is a true child of Israel. There is no duplicity in him.” Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, I saw you under the fig tree.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.”

Jesus answered and said to him, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this.” And he said to him, “Amen, amen, I say to you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Mother, help our faith! Open our ears to hear God’s word and to recognize his voice and call.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

An Affair of the Heart

When Jesus sees Nathanael coming toward him he calls him a “true child of Israel.”  We do not know why Jesus has this strong reaction to Nathanael. We know that Nathanael was sitting under a fig tree, but we don’t know what he was doing. We know that Philip approached him, although we don’t know why, and that Nathanael accepted his invitation to see who it was from Nazareth that was fulfillment of the law and prophets. We also know that Nathanael says the “right things” in response to meeting Jesus.

What was it about Nathanael—about who he was, about his faith, about whatever he was doing under the fig tree—that warranted Jesus’ reaction to seeing him and also the inclusion of this story in the Gospel of John? One possibility is that Jesus knew Nathanael’s heart and spirit and had known him since his own beginning. That fact and Nathanael’s curiosity and openness to the One who Phillip wanted him to see results in Jesus’ reaction.

This begs the question—what would Jesus’ reaction be if he saw me today? What would I be doing? Would I go with Phillip? What would Jesus sense of my being, my heart, my spirit be? Jesus has known me my whole life, so would the trajectory of my being and becoming warrant a similar reaction?

—Elizabeth Collier has degrees from three different Jesuit universities, including a PhD in Christian Ethics from Loyola University Chicago. She teaches at Dominican University in River Forest, IL.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 28, 2014

Matthew 21: 28-32

“What do you think? A man had two sons; he went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work in the vineyard today.’ He answered, ‘I will not’; but later he changed his mind and went. The father went to the second and said the same; and he answered, ‘I go, sir’; but he did not go. Which of the two did the will of his father?” They said, “The first.”

Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are going into the kingdom of God ahead of you. For John came to you in the way of righteousness and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him; and even after you saw it, you did not change your minds and believe him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Alive for the Kingdom

Once after reading an auto repair shop’s mission statement a thousand times while waiting in line, I told the manager that, given their performance, the statement could have been reduced to one word: “whatever.” Writing a mission statement is easy; there are even “mission statement templates.” Doing the mission is the challenge.

Similarly, as individuals we can’t be content with lives marked only by our good intentions. When Jesus told his audience that “Tax collectors and prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God before you,” it was a wake-up call. Contentment with intention without action keeps us lounging comfortably on the couches of our lives, keeps us from giving ourselves fully to God’s exciting project.

James Brown sang, “Get up offa that thing, and dance ’til you feel better.” Let’s do just that. Let’s leave our metaphorical couches and get out on the dance floor with Jesus.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is a professor of education and Rector of the Jesuit community at John Carroll University, University Heights OH.

Prayer

Giver of life, Creator of all that is lovely,
Teach me to sing the words of your song;
I want to feel the music of living
And not fear the sad songs,
But from them make new songs
Composed of both laughter and tears.
Teach me to dance to the sounds of your
world and your people,
I want to move in rhythm with your plan;
Help me to try to follow your leading,
To risk even falling,
To rise and keep trying
Because you are leading the dance.

— Dancer’s Prayer,  Anonymous

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Alive for the Kingdom

Once after reading an auto repair shop’s mission statement a thousand times while waiting in line, I told the manager that, given their performance, the statement could have been reduced to one word: “whatever.” Writing a mission statement is easy; there are even “mission statement templates.” Doing the mission is the challenge.

Similarly, as individuals we can’t be content with lives marked only by our good intentions. When Jesus told his audience that “Tax collectors and prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God before you,” it was a wake-up call. Contentment with intention without action keeps us lounging comfortably on the couches of our lives, keeps us from giving ourselves fully to God’s exciting project.

James Brown sang, “Get up offa that thing, and dance ’til you feel better.” Let’s do just that. Let’s leave our metaphorical couches and get out on the dance floor with Jesus.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is a professor of education and Rector of the Jesuit community at John Carroll University, University Heights OH.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!