October 23, 2014

Ephesians 3: 14-21

For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and on earth takes its name. I pray that, according to the riches of his glory, he may grant that you may be strengthened in your inner being with power through his Spirit, and that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith, as you are being rooted and grounded in love.

I pray that you may have the power to comprehend, with all the saints, what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, so that you may be filled with all the fullness of God. Now to him who by the power at work within us is able to accomplish abundantly far more than all we can ask or imagine, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus to all generations, forever and ever. Amen.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Abandoning Myself

When I graduated from Marquette in 1994, I worked for a couple of years to “end homelessness.” And homelessness persisted and God stayed quite unfeeling in his dappled sky and my expectations for what we can do in the world lessened. Dwindled to a pithy desperate phrase: this is simply how the world is. And yet God, as Paul tells the Ephesians, can accomplish more than we can ask or imagine. St. Ignatius has a similar thought: “There are very few men who realize what God would make of them if they abandoned themselves entirely to his hands.”

Abandon yourself entirely. This feels ridiculous and terrifying. How to let go completely? I think Ignatius would say: Abandon even the fear of abandoning yourself. Abandon to God the very act of abandonment and simply let God do his work, more than you ask or imagine. Let us put homelessness to route. Let us do whatever. But let God do it through you. God and his grace. That is enough for us.

—Joe Hoover, S.J. is a Jesuit brother writing and acting in New York. He serves as poetry editor of America magazine and also works at St. Ignatius Grammar School.

Prayer

My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going. I do not see the road ahead of me. I cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so.

But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you and I hope that I have that desire in all that I am doing. And I know that if I do this, you will lead me by the right road although I may know nothing about it.

Therefore will I trust you always though I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death, I will not fear, for you are ever with me and you will never leave me to face my perils alone.

—Thomas Merton, OCSO, Prayer of Abandonment

 


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October 23, 2014

Ephesians 3: 14-21

For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and on earth takes its name. I pray that, according to the riches of his glory, he may grant that you may be strengthened in your inner being with power through his Spirit, and that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith, as you are being rooted and grounded in love.

I pray that you may have the power to comprehend, with all the saints, what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, so that you may be filled with all the fullness of God. Now to him who by the power at work within us is able to accomplish abundantly far more than all we can ask or imagine, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus to all generations, forever and ever. Amen.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Abandoning Myself

When I graduated from Marquette in 1994, I worked for a couple of years to “end homelessness.” And homelessness persisted and God stayed quite unfeeling in his dappled sky and my expectations for what we can do in the world lessened. Dwindled to a pithy desperate phrase: this is simply how the world is. And yet God, as Paul tells the Ephesians, can accomplish more than we can ask or imagine. St. Ignatius has a similar thought: “There are very few men who realize what God would make of them if they abandoned themselves entirely to his hands.”

Abandon yourself entirely. This feels ridiculous and terrifying. How to let go completely? I think Ignatius would say: Abandon even the fear of abandoning yourself. Abandon to God the very act of abandonment and simply let God do his work, more than you ask or imagine. Let us put homelessness to route. Let us do whatever. But let God do it through you. God and his grace. That is enough for us.

—Joe Hoover, S.J. is a Jesuit brother writing and acting in New York. He serves as poetry editor of America magazine and also works at St. Ignatius Grammar School.

Prayer

My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going. I do not see the road ahead of me. I cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so.

But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you and I hope that I have that desire in all that I am doing. And I know that if I do this, you will lead me by the right road although I may know nothing about it.

Therefore will I trust you always though I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death, I will not fear, for you are ever with me and you will never leave me to face my perils alone.

—Thomas Merton, OCSO, Prayer of Abandonment

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!