January 31, 2015

St. John Bosco

Mk 4: 35-41

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?”

He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Strong Winds

A week ago we experienced a vivid reminder of “strong winds” during the Mass Pope Francis celebrated in Tacloban in the Philippines. (This is the same area hard hit by typhoon Yolanda in Nov. 2013.) Wearing a plastic poncho over his vestments, the pope still wasn’t shielded from the strong winds and heavy rain that came at him sideways throughout the Mass. It was really a bit of a “holy mess.”

The Holy Father remained serene throughout the Mass; his strong faith and focus gave energy to the crowds who sang and prayed with gusto…even as they wiped away the insistent raindrops.

What strong winds and rain are drenching my spirit these days? How does Jesus help me to “be still,” to find both faith and focus as I go about my daily duties?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Living God, our refuge and strength, even the wind and sea obey your voice. Put the wind back in its place, and say to the sea: Peace! Be still!

Fill us with great faith, and save us from the surging waters, so that we may always tell the good news of your saving love. Through Jesus Christ, our hope in every storm. Amen.  (based on Mark 4)

—From the prayerbook of the Presbyterian Church USA


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. John Bosco

Mk 4: 35-41

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?”

He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Living God, our refuge and strength, even the wind and sea obey your voice. Put the wind back in its place, and say to the sea: Peace! Be still!

Fill us with great faith, and save us from the surging waters, so that we may always tell the good news of your saving love. Through Jesus Christ, our hope in every storm. Amen.  (based on Mark 4)

—From the prayerbook of the Presbyterian Church USA


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Strong Winds

A week ago we experienced a vivid reminder of “strong winds” during the Mass Pope Francis celebrated in Tacloban in the Philippines. (This is the same area hard hit by typhoon Yolanda in Nov. 2013.) Wearing a plastic poncho over his vestments, the pope still wasn’t shielded from the strong winds and heavy rain that came at him sideways throughout the Mass. It was really a bit of a “holy mess.”

The Holy Father remained serene throughout the Mass; his strong faith and focus gave energy to the crowds who sang and prayed with gusto…even as they wiped away the insistent raindrops.

What strong winds and rain are drenching my spirit these days? How does Jesus help me to “be still,” to find both faith and focus as I go about my daily duties?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

January 30, 2015

Mk 4: 26-34

He also said, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.”

He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”

With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; he did not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything in private to his disciples.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

God’s Kingdom Always Growing

I do not know much about botany or gardening, but I bet there are bigger trees and smaller seeds than those from the mustard plant. So I believe Mark´s gospel is not referring to size or any other scientific fact, but to the natural process of a seed becoming a large tree. This is exactly how God’s kingdom works—a gradual process that invites our attention along the whole process to understand how it works.

The formation of the Kingdom of God is like a seed that is constantly growing. It sprouts, grows, and patiently flourishes until becoming a strong tree. Little by little God is making transformations, continually working in our lives. God is essentially a creator and can help us transform our lives.  All we need is to invite God to enter into our daily lives.

Our Ignatian spirituality is centered in this concept of establishing the Kingdom of God.  Our central petition is that we are able to act according to God’s will. So I ask the Lord today to move my will and put into my soul all I ought to do, so as to further promote God´s will.

—Fr. Hugo Nelson Gomez-Sevilla is a Jesuit from Colombia, currently pursuing graduate studies in educational leadership at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Eternal Lord of all things, I make my offering with your favor and help, in the presence of your infinite Goodness and in the presence of your glorious mother and of all the saints of the heavenly court: I want and desire, and it is my deliberate determination, if only it be your greater service and praise, to imitate you in bearing all injuries and all abuse and all poverty of spirit, and actual poverty, too, if your most Holy Majesty wants to choose and receive me to such a life and state.

—St. Ignatius Loyola, Spiritual Exercises, #98, “Oblation of the Kingdom”


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

God’s Kingdom Always Growing

I do not know much about botany or gardening, but I bet there are bigger trees and smaller seeds than those from the mustard plant. So I believe Mark´s gospel is not referring to size or any other scientific fact, but to the natural process of a seed becoming a large tree. This is exactly how God’s kingdom works—a gradual process that invites our attention along the whole process to understand how it works.

The formation of the Kingdom of God is like a seed that is constantly growing. It sprouts, grows, and patiently flourishes until becoming a strong tree. Little by little God is making transformations, continually working in our lives. God is essentially a creator and can help us transform our lives.  All we need is to invite God to enter into our daily lives.

Our Ignatian spirituality is centered in this concept of establishing the Kingdom of God.  Our central petition is that we are able to act according to God’s will. So I ask the Lord today to move my will and put into my soul all I ought to do, so as to further promote God´s will.

—Fr. Hugo Nelson Gomez-Sevilla is a Jesuit from Colombia, currently pursuing graduate studies in educational leadership at Loyola University Chicago.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mk 4: 26-34

He also said, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.”

He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”

With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; he did not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything in private to his disciples.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Eternal Lord of all things, I make my offering with your favor and help, in the presence of your infinite Goodness and in the presence of your glorious mother and of all the saints of the heavenly court: I want and desire, and it is my deliberate determination, if only it be your greater service and praise, to imitate you in bearing all injuries and all abuse and all poverty of spirit, and actual poverty, too, if your most Holy Majesty wants to choose and receive me to such a life and state.

—St. Ignatius Loyola, Spiritual Exercises, #98, “Oblation of the Kingdom”


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

January 29, 2015

Mk 4: 21-25

He said to them, “Is a lamp brought in to be put under the bushel basket, or under the bed, and not on the lampstand? For there is nothing hidden, except to be disclosed; nor is anything secret, except to come to light.Let anyone with ears to hear listen!” And he said to them, “Pay attention to what you hear; the measure you give will be the measure you get, and still more will be given you. For to those who have, more will be given; and from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Sharing our light

Each of us has been given a light to share, as Jesus points out in today’s reading. If we fail to share it, or hide it under a bushel basket, it may be “taken away.”

I can intentionally practice shining my light could be tested out on a trip to the grocery store. It might start with giving up the closest parking spot. Then entering the door with a genuine smile; talking and really listening to the neighbor you would normally avoid; making light of your rattling cart; complimenting the deli worker on her efforts as she passes your lunch meat; and encouraging the man who you know is battling a disease. Then it means telling a good enough joke so the checkout person really laughs, not just chuckles.

What everyday chore can you intentionally practice that would share your light with others? What is the “corner of light” that only you have to give the world?  And what would it mean for you, and those around you, if it were taken away?

—Charlotte F. Ahern is a wife and mother of three college-aged children. She is also a spiritual director and retreat leader at Jesuit schools in the Chicago area.

Prayer

Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love; Where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
and where there is sadness, joy.

O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
to be understood as to understand;
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive;
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.

—Attributed to St. Francis of Assisi


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mk 4: 21-25

He said to them, “Is a lamp brought in to be put under the bushel basket, or under the bed, and not on the lampstand? For there is nothing hidden, except to be disclosed; nor is anything secret, except to come to light.Let anyone with ears to hear listen!” And he said to them, “Pay attention to what you hear; the measure you give will be the measure you get, and still more will be given you. For to those who have, more will be given; and from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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January 31, 2015

St. John Bosco

Mk 4: 35-41

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?”

He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Strong Winds

A week ago we experienced a vivid reminder of “strong winds” during the Mass Pope Francis celebrated in Tacloban in the Philippines. (This is the same area hard hit by typhoon Yolanda in Nov. 2013.) Wearing a plastic poncho over his vestments, the pope still wasn’t shielded from the strong winds and heavy rain that came at him sideways throughout the Mass. It was really a bit of a “holy mess.”

The Holy Father remained serene throughout the Mass; his strong faith and focus gave energy to the crowds who sang and prayed with gusto…even as they wiped away the insistent raindrops.

What strong winds and rain are drenching my spirit these days? How does Jesus help me to “be still,” to find both faith and focus as I go about my daily duties?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Living God, our refuge and strength, even the wind and sea obey your voice. Put the wind back in its place, and say to the sea: Peace! Be still!

Fill us with great faith, and save us from the surging waters, so that we may always tell the good news of your saving love. Through Jesus Christ, our hope in every storm. Amen.  (based on Mark 4)

—From the prayerbook of the Presbyterian Church USA


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. John Bosco

Mk 4: 35-41

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?”

He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Living God, our refuge and strength, even the wind and sea obey your voice. Put the wind back in its place, and say to the sea: Peace! Be still!

Fill us with great faith, and save us from the surging waters, so that we may always tell the good news of your saving love. Through Jesus Christ, our hope in every storm. Amen.  (based on Mark 4)

—From the prayerbook of the Presbyterian Church USA


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Strong Winds

A week ago we experienced a vivid reminder of “strong winds” during the Mass Pope Francis celebrated in Tacloban in the Philippines. (This is the same area hard hit by typhoon Yolanda in Nov. 2013.) Wearing a plastic poncho over his vestments, the pope still wasn’t shielded from the strong winds and heavy rain that came at him sideways throughout the Mass. It was really a bit of a “holy mess.”

The Holy Father remained serene throughout the Mass; his strong faith and focus gave energy to the crowds who sang and prayed with gusto…even as they wiped away the insistent raindrops.

What strong winds and rain are drenching my spirit these days? How does Jesus help me to “be still,” to find both faith and focus as I go about my daily duties?

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

January 30, 2015

Mk 4: 26-34

He also said, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.”

He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”

With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; he did not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything in private to his disciples.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

God’s Kingdom Always Growing

I do not know much about botany or gardening, but I bet there are bigger trees and smaller seeds than those from the mustard plant. So I believe Mark´s gospel is not referring to size or any other scientific fact, but to the natural process of a seed becoming a large tree. This is exactly how God’s kingdom works—a gradual process that invites our attention along the whole process to understand how it works.

The formation of the Kingdom of God is like a seed that is constantly growing. It sprouts, grows, and patiently flourishes until becoming a strong tree. Little by little God is making transformations, continually working in our lives. God is essentially a creator and can help us transform our lives.  All we need is to invite God to enter into our daily lives.

Our Ignatian spirituality is centered in this concept of establishing the Kingdom of God.  Our central petition is that we are able to act according to God’s will. So I ask the Lord today to move my will and put into my soul all I ought to do, so as to further promote God´s will.

—Fr. Hugo Nelson Gomez-Sevilla is a Jesuit from Colombia, currently pursuing graduate studies in educational leadership at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Eternal Lord of all things, I make my offering with your favor and help, in the presence of your infinite Goodness and in the presence of your glorious mother and of all the saints of the heavenly court: I want and desire, and it is my deliberate determination, if only it be your greater service and praise, to imitate you in bearing all injuries and all abuse and all poverty of spirit, and actual poverty, too, if your most Holy Majesty wants to choose and receive me to such a life and state.

—St. Ignatius Loyola, Spiritual Exercises, #98, “Oblation of the Kingdom”


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

God’s Kingdom Always Growing

I do not know much about botany or gardening, but I bet there are bigger trees and smaller seeds than those from the mustard plant. So I believe Mark´s gospel is not referring to size or any other scientific fact, but to the natural process of a seed becoming a large tree. This is exactly how God’s kingdom works—a gradual process that invites our attention along the whole process to understand how it works.

The formation of the Kingdom of God is like a seed that is constantly growing. It sprouts, grows, and patiently flourishes until becoming a strong tree. Little by little God is making transformations, continually working in our lives. God is essentially a creator and can help us transform our lives.  All we need is to invite God to enter into our daily lives.

Our Ignatian spirituality is centered in this concept of establishing the Kingdom of God.  Our central petition is that we are able to act according to God’s will. So I ask the Lord today to move my will and put into my soul all I ought to do, so as to further promote God´s will.

—Fr. Hugo Nelson Gomez-Sevilla is a Jesuit from Colombia, currently pursuing graduate studies in educational leadership at Loyola University Chicago.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mk 4: 26-34

He also said, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.”

He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”

With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; he did not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything in private to his disciples.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Eternal Lord of all things, I make my offering with your favor and help, in the presence of your infinite Goodness and in the presence of your glorious mother and of all the saints of the heavenly court: I want and desire, and it is my deliberate determination, if only it be your greater service and praise, to imitate you in bearing all injuries and all abuse and all poverty of spirit, and actual poverty, too, if your most Holy Majesty wants to choose and receive me to such a life and state.

—St. Ignatius Loyola, Spiritual Exercises, #98, “Oblation of the Kingdom”


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

January 29, 2015

Mk 4: 21-25

He said to them, “Is a lamp brought in to be put under the bushel basket, or under the bed, and not on the lampstand? For there is nothing hidden, except to be disclosed; nor is anything secret, except to come to light.Let anyone with ears to hear listen!” And he said to them, “Pay attention to what you hear; the measure you give will be the measure you get, and still more will be given you. For to those who have, more will be given; and from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Sharing our light

Each of us has been given a light to share, as Jesus points out in today’s reading. If we fail to share it, or hide it under a bushel basket, it may be “taken away.”

I can intentionally practice shining my light could be tested out on a trip to the grocery store. It might start with giving up the closest parking spot. Then entering the door with a genuine smile; talking and really listening to the neighbor you would normally avoid; making light of your rattling cart; complimenting the deli worker on her efforts as she passes your lunch meat; and encouraging the man who you know is battling a disease. Then it means telling a good enough joke so the checkout person really laughs, not just chuckles.

What everyday chore can you intentionally practice that would share your light with others? What is the “corner of light” that only you have to give the world?  And what would it mean for you, and those around you, if it were taken away?

—Charlotte F. Ahern is a wife and mother of three college-aged children. She is also a spiritual director and retreat leader at Jesuit schools in the Chicago area.

Prayer

Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love; Where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
and where there is sadness, joy.

O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
to be understood as to understand;
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive;
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.

—Attributed to St. Francis of Assisi


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mk 4: 21-25

He said to them, “Is a lamp brought in to be put under the bushel basket, or under the bed, and not on the lampstand? For there is nothing hidden, except to be disclosed; nor is anything secret, except to come to light.Let anyone with ears to hear listen!” And he said to them, “Pay attention to what you hear; the measure you give will be the measure you get, and still more will be given you. For to those who have, more will be given; and from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!