February 3, 2015

St. Blase and St. Ansgar

Mk 5: 21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’”

He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James.

When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was.

He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

I’m Too Busy

He couldn’t have picked a worse time for another miracle. Just onshore, huge crowds, and someone else got to him first—the official whose daughter is “at the point of death.” Emergency, right? But on the way, Jesus stops. Jesus stops the whole caravan to notice, to heal a woman.

I’ve learned a bit of this while accompanying refugees in Chicago; train rides together are almost always as important as the task we’re going to accomplish. It’s about the journey, the people we journey with, and the way we spend our meantimes.

I’m often too busy, though—too busy going from A to Z with my endless task list to see the people around me at B, C or T. I’m not proud of this, but this gospel both challenges and reassures me—after all, in the end, the girl still lives.

How do I spend my meantimes?

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic from the Wisconsin Province. He is engaged in Master of Social Work studies at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

God,
You know I’m busy,
That I’m always
On the way
To the next big thing,
The next essential task,
One after another—
You know I’m busy.

But I dare you today,
To interrupt me, and—
I dare myself to see,
To be interrupted.

I know I’ll regret this when
I’m busy and stressing and
On my productive way, but
I trust, I know
that you love to visit me
In the busy,
In the stressing and
In the unexpected meantimes.

Oh God,
Open my heart and schedule,

Amen.

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

I’m Too Busy

He couldn’t have picked a worse time for another miracle. Just onshore, huge crowds, and someone else got to him first—the official whose daughter is “at the point of death.” Emergency, right? But on the way, Jesus stops. Jesus stops the whole caravan to notice, to heal a woman.

I’ve learned a bit of this while accompanying refugees in Chicago; train rides together are almost always as important as the task we’re going to accomplish. It’s about the journey, the people we journey with, and the way we spend our meantimes.

I’m often too busy, though—too busy going from A to Z with my endless task list to see the people around me at B, C or T. I’m not proud of this, but this gospel both challenges and reassures me—after all, in the end, the girl still lives.

How do I spend my meantimes?

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic from the Wisconsin Province. He is engaged in Master of Social Work studies at Loyola University Chicago.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Blase and St. Ansgar

Mk 5: 21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’”

He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James.

When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was.

He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God,
You know I’m busy,
That I’m always
On the way
To the next big thing,
The next essential task,
One after another—
You know I’m busy.

But I dare you today,
To interrupt me, and—
I dare myself to see,
To be interrupted.

I know I’ll regret this when
I’m busy and stressing and
On my productive way, but
I trust, I know
that you love to visit me
In the busy,
In the stressing and
In the unexpected meantimes.

Oh God,
Open my heart and schedule,

Amen.

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


Get our FREE App

Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
    123
45678910
       
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
      1
       
     12
       

February 3, 2015

St. Blase and St. Ansgar

Mk 5: 21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’”

He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James.

When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was.

He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

I’m Too Busy

He couldn’t have picked a worse time for another miracle. Just onshore, huge crowds, and someone else got to him first—the official whose daughter is “at the point of death.” Emergency, right? But on the way, Jesus stops. Jesus stops the whole caravan to notice, to heal a woman.

I’ve learned a bit of this while accompanying refugees in Chicago; train rides together are almost always as important as the task we’re going to accomplish. It’s about the journey, the people we journey with, and the way we spend our meantimes.

I’m often too busy, though—too busy going from A to Z with my endless task list to see the people around me at B, C or T. I’m not proud of this, but this gospel both challenges and reassures me—after all, in the end, the girl still lives.

How do I spend my meantimes?

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic from the Wisconsin Province. He is engaged in Master of Social Work studies at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

God,
You know I’m busy,
That I’m always
On the way
To the next big thing,
The next essential task,
One after another—
You know I’m busy.

But I dare you today,
To interrupt me, and—
I dare myself to see,
To be interrupted.

I know I’ll regret this when
I’m busy and stressing and
On my productive way, but
I trust, I know
that you love to visit me
In the busy,
In the stressing and
In the unexpected meantimes.

Oh God,
Open my heart and schedule,

Amen.

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

I’m Too Busy

He couldn’t have picked a worse time for another miracle. Just onshore, huge crowds, and someone else got to him first—the official whose daughter is “at the point of death.” Emergency, right? But on the way, Jesus stops. Jesus stops the whole caravan to notice, to heal a woman.

I’ve learned a bit of this while accompanying refugees in Chicago; train rides together are almost always as important as the task we’re going to accomplish. It’s about the journey, the people we journey with, and the way we spend our meantimes.

I’m often too busy, though—too busy going from A to Z with my endless task list to see the people around me at B, C or T. I’m not proud of this, but this gospel both challenges and reassures me—after all, in the end, the girl still lives.

How do I spend my meantimes?

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic from the Wisconsin Province. He is engaged in Master of Social Work studies at Loyola University Chicago.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Blase and St. Ansgar

Mk 5: 21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’”

He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James.

When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was.

He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God,
You know I’m busy,
That I’m always
On the way
To the next big thing,
The next essential task,
One after another—
You know I’m busy.

But I dare you today,
To interrupt me, and—
I dare myself to see,
To be interrupted.

I know I’ll regret this when
I’m busy and stressing and
On my productive way, but
I trust, I know
that you love to visit me
In the busy,
In the stressing and
In the unexpected meantimes.

Oh God,
Open my heart and schedule,

Amen.

—Garrett Gundlach, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!