May 31, 2015

SOLEMNITY OF THE HOLY TRINITY

Mt 28: 16-20

Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

In the Trinity

Jesus constantly searches for disciples to share his mission. He doesn’t always succeed, even with privileged friends like Peter, but he keeps inviting isolated people like Matthew the tax collector into community.

Although Jesus loves praying in silence, he is never alone for long. This is not an extrovert’s preference but a mirror of the love between Father, Son and Spirit in the Trinity.

Matthew ends his Gospel with Jesus gathering his scattered and fragile disciples on a mountain before sending them out in the name of the Trinity to make the community larger.

Many people are interested in spirituality but not religion, meaning they want to find God without belonging to a community. Ironically, the God they will find, if their quest succeeds, is not a solitary individual, but a community of three Who want to include all of us.

Why wouldn’t I accept their invitation?

—Fr. Tom Rochford, S.J. is moving to Denver where he will serve as chaplain and artist-in-residence at Regis Jesuit High School. He is an artist (primarily oil painting), photographer and videographer.

Prayer

Father all powerful, Christ Lord and Savior, Holy Spirit of love—we praise you!
Be near to the people formed in your image, close to the world your love brings to life. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

In the Trinity

Jesus constantly searches for disciples to share his mission. He doesn’t always succeed, even with privileged friends like Peter, but he keeps inviting isolated people like Matthew the tax collector into community.

Although Jesus loves praying in silence, he is never alone for long. This is not an extrovert’s preference but a mirror of the love between Father, Son and Spirit in the Trinity.

Matthew ends his Gospel with Jesus gathering his scattered and fragile disciples on a mountain before sending them out in the name of the Trinity to make the community larger.

Many people are interested in spirituality but not religion, meaning they want to find God without belonging to a community. Ironically, the God they will find, if their quest succeeds, is not a solitary individual, but a community of three Who want to include all of us.

Why wouldn’t I accept their invitation?

—Fr. Tom Rochford, S.J. is moving to Denver where he will serve as chaplain and artist-in-residence at Regis Jesuit High School. He is an artist (primarily oil painting), photographer and videographer.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Father all powerful, Christ Lord and Savior, Holy Spirit of love—we praise you!
Be near to the people formed in your image, close to the world your love brings to life. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

SOLEMNITY OF THE HOLY TRINITY

Mt 28: 16-20

Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 30, 2015

Mk 11: 27-33

Again they came to Jerusalem. As he was walking in the temple, the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders came to him and said, “By what authority are you doing these things? Who gave you this authority to do them?” Jesus said to them, “I will ask you one question; answer me, and I will tell you by what authority I do these things. Did the baptism of John come from heaven, or was it of human origin? Answer me.” They argued with one another, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ he will say, ‘Why then did you not believe him?’ But shall we say, ‘Of human origin’?” —they were afraid of the crowd, for all regarded John as truly a prophet. So they answered Jesus, “We do not know.” And Jesus said to them, “Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Living the Holy Spirit’s Gifts

We come to the end of Pentecost week—a time when we bless God for the gifts of the Holy Spirit that are strong in our souls each day of the year. We list these gifts as wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, holiness, and reverence for the God’s life within us. These gifts mark our commitment to know and understand God’s ways, to sharpen our instinct for service in God’s name, to practice our faith in the concrete day-to-day opportunities that come our way wherever we are, whatever we do. Our faith is not a trophy to be set on a shelf. It is the living, breathing presence of God’s Holy Spirit stretching me to prayer and practical service of my family, my parish, my neighborhood. Life in the Spirit is truly life in God’s love!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

All powerful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, by water and the Holy Spirit you freed your sons and daughters from sin and gave them new life. Send your Holy Spirit upon them to be their helper and guide. Give them the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of right judgment and courage, the spirit of knowledge and reverence. Fill them with the spirit of wonder and awe in your presence. We ask this through Christ our Lord.

—Prayer from the Rite of Confirmation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mk 11: 27-33

Again they came to Jerusalem. As he was walking in the temple, the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders came to him and said, “By what authority are you doing these things? Who gave you this authority to do them?” Jesus said to them, “I will ask you one question; answer me, and I will tell you by what authority I do these things. Did the baptism of John come from heaven, or was it of human origin? Answer me.” They argued with one another, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ he will say, ‘Why then did you not believe him?’ But shall we say, ‘Of human origin’?” —they were afraid of the crowd, for all regarded John as truly a prophet. So they answered Jesus, “We do not know.” And Jesus said to them, “Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

All powerful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, by water and the Holy Spirit you freed your sons and daughters from sin and gave them new life. Send your Holy Spirit upon them to be their helper and guide. Give them the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of right judgment and courage, the spirit of knowledge and reverence. Fill them with the spirit of wonder and awe in your presence. We ask this through Christ our Lord.

—Prayer from the Rite of Confirmation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Living the Holy Spirit’s Gifts

We come to the end of Pentecost week—a time when we bless God for the gifts of the Holy Spirit that are strong in our souls each day of the year. We list these gifts as wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, holiness, and reverence for the God’s life within us. These gifts mark our commitment to know and understand God’s ways, to sharpen our instinct for service in God’s name, to practice our faith in the concrete day-to-day opportunities that come our way wherever we are, whatever we do. Our faith is not a trophy to be set on a shelf. It is the living, breathing presence of God’s Holy Spirit stretching me to prayer and practical service of my family, my parish, my neighborhood. Life in the Spirit is truly life in God’s love!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 29, 2015

Mark 11: 11-26

Then he entered Jerusalem and went into the temple; and when he had looked around at everything, as it was already late, he went out to Bethany with the twelve.

On the following day, when they came from Bethany, he was hungry. Seeing in the distance a fig tree in leaf, he went to see whether perhaps he would find anything on it. When he came to it, he found nothing but leaves, for it was not the season for figs. He said to it, “May no one ever eat fruit from you again.” And his disciples heard it.

Then they came to Jerusalem. And he entered the temple and began to drive out those who were selling and those who were buying in the temple, and he overturned the tables of the money changers and the seats of those who sold doves; and he would not allow anyone to carry anything through the temple. He was teaching and saying, “Is it not written,

‘My house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations’?

But you have made it a den of robbers.”

And when the chief priests and the scribes heard it, they kept looking for a way to kill him; for they were afraid of him, because the whole crowd was spellbound by his teaching. And when evening came, Jesus and his disciples went out of the city.

In the morning as they passed by, they saw the fig tree withered away to its roots. Then Peter remembered and said to him, “Rabbi, look! The fig tree that you cursed has withered.” Jesus answered them, “Have faith in God. Truly I tell you, if you say to this mountain, ‘Be taken up and thrown into the sea,’ and if you do not doubt in your heart, but believe that what you say will come to pass, it will be done for you. So I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours.

“Whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone; so that your Father in heaven may also forgive you your trespasses.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Our Powerful Words

The traffic made me late, so I was not really prepared for my morning presentation. Then the headache started. When my friend called complaining that I had not visited in a long time, I said some words that I immediately regretted. I hurt my friend. Did Jesus regret his words to the fig tree? He was clearly having a bad day. What advice would he give us when we are having a bad day? His words at the end of today’s Gospel passage are helpful: “forgive anyone against whom you have a grievance.” Hmm, wish I would have thought of that before attacking my friend. Maybe Jesus knows we can hurt people when we are having a bad day. He certainly is telling us that our thoughts and words and our prayers have power. Power for good, but also for ill. We need to be careful how we use them!

—Fr. Tim Hipskind, S.J. is co-director of the Institute for Leadership and Service, as well as Director of Service Learning at the University of Detroit Mercy. He regularly ministers to Hispanic Catholics in the Detroit area.

Prayer

Life-giving God,, there are times when I need to speak, and times when I need to be quiet. Give me the wisdom to know the difference and the courage to respond accordingly. “Set a guard over my mouth, O Lord; keep watch over the door of my lips.”  (Psalm 141:3)

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Our Powerful Words

The traffic made me late, so I was not really prepared for my morning presentation. Then the headache started. When my friend called complaining that I had not visited in a long time, I said some words that I immediately regretted. I hurt my friend. Did Jesus regret his words to the fig tree? He was clearly having a bad day. What advice would he give us when we are having a bad day? His words at the end of today’s Gospel passage are helpful: “forgive anyone against whom you have a grievance.” Hmm, wish I would have thought of that before attacking my friend. Maybe Jesus knows we can hurt people when we are having a bad day. He certainly is telling us that our thoughts and words and our prayers have power. Power for good, but also for ill. We need to be careful how we use them!

—Fr. Tim Hipskind, S.J. is co-director of the Institute for Leadership and Service, as well as Director of Service Learning at the University of Detroit Mercy. He regularly ministers to Hispanic Catholics in the Detroit area.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


Get our FREE App

Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
      1
23242526272829
3031     
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
    123
45678910
       
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

May 31, 2015

SOLEMNITY OF THE HOLY TRINITY

Mt 28: 16-20

Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

In the Trinity

Jesus constantly searches for disciples to share his mission. He doesn’t always succeed, even with privileged friends like Peter, but he keeps inviting isolated people like Matthew the tax collector into community.

Although Jesus loves praying in silence, he is never alone for long. This is not an extrovert’s preference but a mirror of the love between Father, Son and Spirit in the Trinity.

Matthew ends his Gospel with Jesus gathering his scattered and fragile disciples on a mountain before sending them out in the name of the Trinity to make the community larger.

Many people are interested in spirituality but not religion, meaning they want to find God without belonging to a community. Ironically, the God they will find, if their quest succeeds, is not a solitary individual, but a community of three Who want to include all of us.

Why wouldn’t I accept their invitation?

—Fr. Tom Rochford, S.J. is moving to Denver where he will serve as chaplain and artist-in-residence at Regis Jesuit High School. He is an artist (primarily oil painting), photographer and videographer.

Prayer

Father all powerful, Christ Lord and Savior, Holy Spirit of love—we praise you!
Be near to the people formed in your image, close to the world your love brings to life. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

In the Trinity

Jesus constantly searches for disciples to share his mission. He doesn’t always succeed, even with privileged friends like Peter, but he keeps inviting isolated people like Matthew the tax collector into community.

Although Jesus loves praying in silence, he is never alone for long. This is not an extrovert’s preference but a mirror of the love between Father, Son and Spirit in the Trinity.

Matthew ends his Gospel with Jesus gathering his scattered and fragile disciples on a mountain before sending them out in the name of the Trinity to make the community larger.

Many people are interested in spirituality but not religion, meaning they want to find God without belonging to a community. Ironically, the God they will find, if their quest succeeds, is not a solitary individual, but a community of three Who want to include all of us.

Why wouldn’t I accept their invitation?

—Fr. Tom Rochford, S.J. is moving to Denver where he will serve as chaplain and artist-in-residence at Regis Jesuit High School. He is an artist (primarily oil painting), photographer and videographer.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Father all powerful, Christ Lord and Savior, Holy Spirit of love—we praise you!
Be near to the people formed in your image, close to the world your love brings to life. Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

SOLEMNITY OF THE HOLY TRINITY

Mt 28: 16-20

Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 30, 2015

Mk 11: 27-33

Again they came to Jerusalem. As he was walking in the temple, the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders came to him and said, “By what authority are you doing these things? Who gave you this authority to do them?” Jesus said to them, “I will ask you one question; answer me, and I will tell you by what authority I do these things. Did the baptism of John come from heaven, or was it of human origin? Answer me.” They argued with one another, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ he will say, ‘Why then did you not believe him?’ But shall we say, ‘Of human origin’?” —they were afraid of the crowd, for all regarded John as truly a prophet. So they answered Jesus, “We do not know.” And Jesus said to them, “Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Living the Holy Spirit’s Gifts

We come to the end of Pentecost week—a time when we bless God for the gifts of the Holy Spirit that are strong in our souls each day of the year. We list these gifts as wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, holiness, and reverence for the God’s life within us. These gifts mark our commitment to know and understand God’s ways, to sharpen our instinct for service in God’s name, to practice our faith in the concrete day-to-day opportunities that come our way wherever we are, whatever we do. Our faith is not a trophy to be set on a shelf. It is the living, breathing presence of God’s Holy Spirit stretching me to prayer and practical service of my family, my parish, my neighborhood. Life in the Spirit is truly life in God’s love!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

All powerful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, by water and the Holy Spirit you freed your sons and daughters from sin and gave them new life. Send your Holy Spirit upon them to be their helper and guide. Give them the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of right judgment and courage, the spirit of knowledge and reverence. Fill them with the spirit of wonder and awe in your presence. We ask this through Christ our Lord.

—Prayer from the Rite of Confirmation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mk 11: 27-33

Again they came to Jerusalem. As he was walking in the temple, the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders came to him and said, “By what authority are you doing these things? Who gave you this authority to do them?” Jesus said to them, “I will ask you one question; answer me, and I will tell you by what authority I do these things. Did the baptism of John come from heaven, or was it of human origin? Answer me.” They argued with one another, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ he will say, ‘Why then did you not believe him?’ But shall we say, ‘Of human origin’?” —they were afraid of the crowd, for all regarded John as truly a prophet. So they answered Jesus, “We do not know.” And Jesus said to them, “Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

All powerful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, by water and the Holy Spirit you freed your sons and daughters from sin and gave them new life. Send your Holy Spirit upon them to be their helper and guide. Give them the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of right judgment and courage, the spirit of knowledge and reverence. Fill them with the spirit of wonder and awe in your presence. We ask this through Christ our Lord.

—Prayer from the Rite of Confirmation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Living the Holy Spirit’s Gifts

We come to the end of Pentecost week—a time when we bless God for the gifts of the Holy Spirit that are strong in our souls each day of the year. We list these gifts as wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, holiness, and reverence for the God’s life within us. These gifts mark our commitment to know and understand God’s ways, to sharpen our instinct for service in God’s name, to practice our faith in the concrete day-to-day opportunities that come our way wherever we are, whatever we do. Our faith is not a trophy to be set on a shelf. It is the living, breathing presence of God’s Holy Spirit stretching me to prayer and practical service of my family, my parish, my neighborhood. Life in the Spirit is truly life in God’s love!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

May 29, 2015

Mark 11: 11-26

Then he entered Jerusalem and went into the temple; and when he had looked around at everything, as it was already late, he went out to Bethany with the twelve.

On the following day, when they came from Bethany, he was hungry. Seeing in the distance a fig tree in leaf, he went to see whether perhaps he would find anything on it. When he came to it, he found nothing but leaves, for it was not the season for figs. He said to it, “May no one ever eat fruit from you again.” And his disciples heard it.

Then they came to Jerusalem. And he entered the temple and began to drive out those who were selling and those who were buying in the temple, and he overturned the tables of the money changers and the seats of those who sold doves; and he would not allow anyone to carry anything through the temple. He was teaching and saying, “Is it not written,

‘My house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations’?

But you have made it a den of robbers.”

And when the chief priests and the scribes heard it, they kept looking for a way to kill him; for they were afraid of him, because the whole crowd was spellbound by his teaching. And when evening came, Jesus and his disciples went out of the city.

In the morning as they passed by, they saw the fig tree withered away to its roots. Then Peter remembered and said to him, “Rabbi, look! The fig tree that you cursed has withered.” Jesus answered them, “Have faith in God. Truly I tell you, if you say to this mountain, ‘Be taken up and thrown into the sea,’ and if you do not doubt in your heart, but believe that what you say will come to pass, it will be done for you. So I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours.

“Whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone; so that your Father in heaven may also forgive you your trespasses.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Our Powerful Words

The traffic made me late, so I was not really prepared for my morning presentation. Then the headache started. When my friend called complaining that I had not visited in a long time, I said some words that I immediately regretted. I hurt my friend. Did Jesus regret his words to the fig tree? He was clearly having a bad day. What advice would he give us when we are having a bad day? His words at the end of today’s Gospel passage are helpful: “forgive anyone against whom you have a grievance.” Hmm, wish I would have thought of that before attacking my friend. Maybe Jesus knows we can hurt people when we are having a bad day. He certainly is telling us that our thoughts and words and our prayers have power. Power for good, but also for ill. We need to be careful how we use them!

—Fr. Tim Hipskind, S.J. is co-director of the Institute for Leadership and Service, as well as Director of Service Learning at the University of Detroit Mercy. He regularly ministers to Hispanic Catholics in the Detroit area.

Prayer

Life-giving God,, there are times when I need to speak, and times when I need to be quiet. Give me the wisdom to know the difference and the courage to respond accordingly. “Set a guard over my mouth, O Lord; keep watch over the door of my lips.”  (Psalm 141:3)

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Our Powerful Words

The traffic made me late, so I was not really prepared for my morning presentation. Then the headache started. When my friend called complaining that I had not visited in a long time, I said some words that I immediately regretted. I hurt my friend. Did Jesus regret his words to the fig tree? He was clearly having a bad day. What advice would he give us when we are having a bad day? His words at the end of today’s Gospel passage are helpful: “forgive anyone against whom you have a grievance.” Hmm, wish I would have thought of that before attacking my friend. Maybe Jesus knows we can hurt people when we are having a bad day. He certainly is telling us that our thoughts and words and our prayers have power. Power for good, but also for ill. We need to be careful how we use them!

—Fr. Tim Hipskind, S.J. is co-director of the Institute for Leadership and Service, as well as Director of Service Learning at the University of Detroit Mercy. He regularly ministers to Hispanic Catholics in the Detroit area.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!