May 1, 2015

Feast of St. Joseph the Worker

Acts 13:26-33

When Paul came to Antioch in Pisidia, he said in the synagogue: “My brothers, children of the family of Abraham, and those others among you who are God-fearing, to us this word of salvation has been sent. The inhabitants of Jerusalem and their leaders failed to recognize him, and by condemning him they fulfilled the oracles of the prophets that are read sabbath after sabbath. For even though they found no grounds for a death sentence, they asked Pilate to have him put to death, and when they had accomplished all that was written about him, they took him down from the tree and placed him in a tomb. But God raised him from the dead, and for many days he appeared to those who had come up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem. These are now his witnesses before the people.

We ourselves are proclaiming this good news to you that what God promised our fathers he has brought to fulfillment for us, their children, by raising up Jesus, as it is written in the second psalm, You are my Son; this day I have begotten you.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Saving Message of Jesus

Today we hear of Paul’s first journey as he arrives in Antioch of Pisidia in Asia Minor, where he spent several years proclaiming the good news, chiefly in synagogues to the large Jewish community.  The saga of nascent Christianity and Paul’s preaching about the Risen Jesus depicted in the readings from Acts of the Apostles intrigues me.

From other readings in Acts we learn that early Christianity struggled in numerous ways: oppression from authorities, lack of acceptance in the Jewish community where the followers of the Way first preached, differences among the disciples, especially about the necessity to convert to Judaism.

Just as early Christianity struggled, so we often face obstacles in our own faith life. Bringing faith to fruition is a slow process. The struggle persists not only in the Church, but also on an individual basis.  In the midst of this struggle, we must lose neither patience nor belief in the saving message of the death and resurrection of Jesus..

―George Penman Sullivan, Jr. is a Jesuit-educated lay leader who helped found Chicago’s Ignatian Volunteer Corps. He and his wife, Dorothy, live in Wilmette IL, and have four children and three grandchildren.

Prayer

Patient Trust

Above all, trust in the slow work of God.
We are quite naturally impatient in everything
to reach the end without delay.
We should like to skip the intermediate stages.
We are impatient of being on the way to something
unknown, something new.
And yet it is the law of all progress
that it is made by passing through
some stages of instability—
and that it may take a very long time.

And so I think it is with you;
your ideas mature gradually—let them grow,
let them shape themselves, without undue haste.
Don’t try to force them on,
as though you could be today what time
(that is to say, grace and circumstances
acting on your own good will)
will make of you tomorrow.
Only God could say what this new spirit
gradually forming within you will be.
Give Our Lord the benefit of believing
that his hand is leading you,
and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself
in suspense and incomplete.

—Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of St. Joseph the Worker

Acts 13:26-33

When Paul came to Antioch in Pisidia, he said in the synagogue: “My brothers, children of the family of Abraham, and those others among you who are God-fearing, to us this word of salvation has been sent. The inhabitants of Jerusalem and their leaders failed to recognize him, and by condemning him they fulfilled the oracles of the prophets that are read sabbath after sabbath. For even though they found no grounds for a death sentence, they asked Pilate to have him put to death, and when they had accomplished all that was written about him, they took him down from the tree and placed him in a tomb. But God raised him from the dead, and for many days he appeared to those who had come up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem. These are now his witnesses before the people.

We ourselves are proclaiming this good news to you that what God promised our fathers he has brought to fulfillment for us, their children, by raising up Jesus, as it is written in the second psalm, You are my Son; this day I have begotten you.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Saving Message of Jesus

Today we hear of Paul’s first journey as he arrives in Antioch of Pisidia in Asia Minor, where he spent several years proclaiming the good news, chiefly in synagogues to the large Jewish community.  The saga of nascent Christianity and Paul’s preaching about the Risen Jesus depicted in the readings from Acts of the Apostles intrigues me.

From other readings in Acts we learn that early Christianity struggled in numerous ways: oppression from authorities, lack of acceptance in the Jewish community where the followers of the Way first preached, differences among the disciples, especially about the necessity to convert to Judaism.

Just as early Christianity struggled, so we often face obstacles in our own faith life. Bringing faith to fruition is a slow process. The struggle persists not only in the Church, but also on an individual basis.  In the midst of this struggle, we must lose neither patience nor belief in the saving message of the death and resurrection of Jesus..

―George Penman Sullivan, Jr. is a Jesuit-educated lay leader who helped found Chicago’s Ignatian Volunteer Corps. He and his wife, Dorothy, live in Wilmette IL, and have four children and three grandchildren.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Patient Trust

Above all, trust in the slow work of God.
We are quite naturally impatient in everything
to reach the end without delay.
We should like to skip the intermediate stages.
We are impatient of being on the way to something
unknown, something new.
And yet it is the law of all progress
that it is made by passing through
some stages of instability—
and that it may take a very long time.

And so I think it is with you;
your ideas mature gradually—let them grow,
let them shape themselves, without undue haste.
Don’t try to force them on,
as though you could be today what time
(that is to say, grace and circumstances
acting on your own good will)
will make of you tomorrow.
Only God could say what this new spirit
gradually forming within you will be.
Give Our Lord the benefit of believing
that his hand is leading you,
and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself
in suspense and incomplete.

—Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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May 1, 2015

Feast of St. Joseph the Worker

Acts 13:26-33

When Paul came to Antioch in Pisidia, he said in the synagogue: “My brothers, children of the family of Abraham, and those others among you who are God-fearing, to us this word of salvation has been sent. The inhabitants of Jerusalem and their leaders failed to recognize him, and by condemning him they fulfilled the oracles of the prophets that are read sabbath after sabbath. For even though they found no grounds for a death sentence, they asked Pilate to have him put to death, and when they had accomplished all that was written about him, they took him down from the tree and placed him in a tomb. But God raised him from the dead, and for many days he appeared to those who had come up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem. These are now his witnesses before the people.

We ourselves are proclaiming this good news to you that what God promised our fathers he has brought to fulfillment for us, their children, by raising up Jesus, as it is written in the second psalm, You are my Son; this day I have begotten you.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Saving Message of Jesus

Today we hear of Paul’s first journey as he arrives in Antioch of Pisidia in Asia Minor, where he spent several years proclaiming the good news, chiefly in synagogues to the large Jewish community.  The saga of nascent Christianity and Paul’s preaching about the Risen Jesus depicted in the readings from Acts of the Apostles intrigues me.

From other readings in Acts we learn that early Christianity struggled in numerous ways: oppression from authorities, lack of acceptance in the Jewish community where the followers of the Way first preached, differences among the disciples, especially about the necessity to convert to Judaism.

Just as early Christianity struggled, so we often face obstacles in our own faith life. Bringing faith to fruition is a slow process. The struggle persists not only in the Church, but also on an individual basis.  In the midst of this struggle, we must lose neither patience nor belief in the saving message of the death and resurrection of Jesus..

―George Penman Sullivan, Jr. is a Jesuit-educated lay leader who helped found Chicago’s Ignatian Volunteer Corps. He and his wife, Dorothy, live in Wilmette IL, and have four children and three grandchildren.

Prayer

Patient Trust

Above all, trust in the slow work of God.
We are quite naturally impatient in everything
to reach the end without delay.
We should like to skip the intermediate stages.
We are impatient of being on the way to something
unknown, something new.
And yet it is the law of all progress
that it is made by passing through
some stages of instability—
and that it may take a very long time.

And so I think it is with you;
your ideas mature gradually—let them grow,
let them shape themselves, without undue haste.
Don’t try to force them on,
as though you could be today what time
(that is to say, grace and circumstances
acting on your own good will)
will make of you tomorrow.
Only God could say what this new spirit
gradually forming within you will be.
Give Our Lord the benefit of believing
that his hand is leading you,
and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself
in suspense and incomplete.

—Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of St. Joseph the Worker

Acts 13:26-33

When Paul came to Antioch in Pisidia, he said in the synagogue: “My brothers, children of the family of Abraham, and those others among you who are God-fearing, to us this word of salvation has been sent. The inhabitants of Jerusalem and their leaders failed to recognize him, and by condemning him they fulfilled the oracles of the prophets that are read sabbath after sabbath. For even though they found no grounds for a death sentence, they asked Pilate to have him put to death, and when they had accomplished all that was written about him, they took him down from the tree and placed him in a tomb. But God raised him from the dead, and for many days he appeared to those who had come up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem. These are now his witnesses before the people.

We ourselves are proclaiming this good news to you that what God promised our fathers he has brought to fulfillment for us, their children, by raising up Jesus, as it is written in the second psalm, You are my Son; this day I have begotten you.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Saving Message of Jesus

Today we hear of Paul’s first journey as he arrives in Antioch of Pisidia in Asia Minor, where he spent several years proclaiming the good news, chiefly in synagogues to the large Jewish community.  The saga of nascent Christianity and Paul’s preaching about the Risen Jesus depicted in the readings from Acts of the Apostles intrigues me.

From other readings in Acts we learn that early Christianity struggled in numerous ways: oppression from authorities, lack of acceptance in the Jewish community where the followers of the Way first preached, differences among the disciples, especially about the necessity to convert to Judaism.

Just as early Christianity struggled, so we often face obstacles in our own faith life. Bringing faith to fruition is a slow process. The struggle persists not only in the Church, but also on an individual basis.  In the midst of this struggle, we must lose neither patience nor belief in the saving message of the death and resurrection of Jesus..

―George Penman Sullivan, Jr. is a Jesuit-educated lay leader who helped found Chicago’s Ignatian Volunteer Corps. He and his wife, Dorothy, live in Wilmette IL, and have four children and three grandchildren.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Patient Trust

Above all, trust in the slow work of God.
We are quite naturally impatient in everything
to reach the end without delay.
We should like to skip the intermediate stages.
We are impatient of being on the way to something
unknown, something new.
And yet it is the law of all progress
that it is made by passing through
some stages of instability—
and that it may take a very long time.

And so I think it is with you;
your ideas mature gradually—let them grow,
let them shape themselves, without undue haste.
Don’t try to force them on,
as though you could be today what time
(that is to say, grace and circumstances
acting on your own good will)
will make of you tomorrow.
Only God could say what this new spirit
gradually forming within you will be.
Give Our Lord the benefit of believing
that his hand is leading you,
and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself
in suspense and incomplete.

—Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!