June 30, 2015

First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 23-27

And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep. And they went and woke him up, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, you of little faith?” Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a dead calm. They were amazed, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Stormy Weather

The problem with writing a reflection on the gospel passage for today is to decide on which type of storms to focus. Homilists often spiritualize the problem, speaking of the internal turmoil of our emotions and thought patterns. At times, societal storms become the focus to highlight the real challenges that global climate change, oppressive social structures, or random acts of violence place on fully living our Christian vocation.

Speaking of different types of storms might suggest each category has a different origin. Whether an external or internal storm, they are intricately connected. As Jesuit St. Peter Faber once noted, the problems that human society faces have spiritual roots. Technological advances offer assistance, but only God can touch that place of fear, greed, or despair that causes these problems. We must turn to Christ like the apostles, and ask for a peace that transforms our hearts.

When I encounter the storms of a Christian vocation, where do I turn for help? Is Christ inviting me to trust him more deeply? If I am seeking peace in my life, where areas of my heart need to be transformed?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

Prayer

Living God, stand by me. Hold me up. Be my strength when I am tired, my inspiration when I am bored, my life when I am listless. Living God, I cannot always meet the standard expected of me, cannot always be the personality I am known for. Abba when I fail, Abba when I stumble, I will rest in your presence.

—Edwina Gately


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Stormy Weather

The problem with writing a reflection on the gospel passage for today is to decide on which type of storms to focus. Homilists often spiritualize the problem, speaking of the internal turmoil of our emotions and thought patterns. At times, societal storms become the focus to highlight the real challenges that global climate change, oppressive social structures, or random acts of violence place on fully living our Christian vocation.

Speaking of different types of storms might suggest each category has a different origin. Whether an external or internal storm, they are intricately connected. As Jesuit St. Peter Faber once noted, the problems that human society faces have spiritual roots. Technological advances offer assistance, but only God can touch that place of fear, greed, or despair that causes these problems. We must turn to Christ like the apostles, and ask for a peace that transforms our hearts.

When I encounter the storms of a Christian vocation, where do I turn for help? Is Christ inviting me to trust him more deeply? If I am seeking peace in my life, where areas of my heart need to be transformed?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 23-27

And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep. And they went and woke him up, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, you of little faith?” Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a dead calm. They were amazed, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Living God, stand by me. Hold me up. Be my strength when I am tired, my inspiration when I am bored, my life when I am listless. Living God, I cannot always meet the standard expected of me, cannot always be the personality I am known for. Abba when I fail, Abba when I stumble, I will rest in your presence.

—Edwina Gately


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 29, 2015

SOLEMNITY OF STS. PETER AND PAUL, Apostles

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Path to Freedom

The story of Peter’s liberation from prison is such a great story to pray with.  I enter into it with my imagination and sit next to Peter and feel the weight of the chains on my wrists and this quickly invites me to ask, “What is binding me this day?  What is keeping me imprisoned and unfree?” Then I imagine hearing the voice of the angel and seeing the light. This reminds me that I cannot free myself. I can only be open to the variety of ways the Lord may be reaching out to me, guiding me to healing. The scripture also reminds me that healing is a journey. The angel took Peter past one guard, then another. The gate leading out of the city opened and they made their way down an alley . . .

Today I invite you to consider, What has you bound or imprisoned, keeping you from being who God created you to be? Maybe an addiction, an attitude, expectations, fear, guilt or shame? What are the guards that are in the way on your journey to healing? And, maybe most importantly, can you pray for and notice God’s help on the journey?

—Amy Hoover, spiritual director and a frequent spiritual writer, is Director of the Creighton University Retreat Center, located in Griswold, IA.

Prayer

Holy Spirit, come! Open my mind to seek the truth.  Break down the barriers that imprison me.  Empower me to overcome any guilt by asking for forgiveness. Enable me to forgive others and release my past hurt and anger. Open my eyes to vices, habits, and attitudes that are destructive to me and to others. Guide me to true freedom with your Word.  Amen

—Excerpted from the Catholic Youth Bible, © St. Mary’s Press, Winona, MN, 2005.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Holy Spirit, come! Open my mind to seek the truth.  Break down the barriers that imprison me.  Empower me to overcome any guilt by asking for forgiveness. Enable me to forgive others and release my past hurt and anger. Open my eyes to vices, habits, and attitudes that are destructive to me and to others. Guide me to true freedom with your Word.  Amen

—Excerpted from the Catholic Youth Bible, © St. Mary’s Press, Winona, MN, 2005.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

SOLEMNITY OF STS. PETER AND PAUL, Apostles

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Path to Freedom

The story of Peter’s liberation from prison is such a great story to pray with.  I enter into it with my imagination and sit next to Peter and feel the weight of the chains on my wrists and this quickly invites me to ask, “What is binding me this day?  What is keeping me imprisoned and unfree?” Then I imagine hearing the voice of the angel and seeing the light. This reminds me that I cannot free myself. I can only be open to the variety of ways the Lord may be reaching out to me, guiding me to healing. The scripture also reminds me that healing is a journey. The angel took Peter past one guard, then another. The gate leading out of the city opened and they made their way down an alley . . .

Today I invite you to consider, What has you bound or imprisoned, keeping you from being who God created you to be? Maybe an addiction, an attitude, expectations, fear, guilt or shame? What are the guards that are in the way on your journey to healing? And, maybe most importantly, can you pray for and notice God’s help on the journey?

—Amy Hoover, spiritual director and a frequent spiritual writer, is Director of the Creighton University Retreat Center, located in Griswold, IA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 28, 2015

Mk 5: 21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.” Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease.

Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’” He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James. When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly.

When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was. He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Acting Like Christ

Imagine suffering from a slow loss of blood, on and off, day after day for twelve years! And in Jesus’ time, loss of blood like this made one ritually impure, and so you became isolated from the community. Unclean!

St. Ignatius talks of the Magis: the ‘more’ that Jesus is asking of us. Look at Jesus and his Magis: though divine, he was still a first-century Jewish man, but he sees ‘more,’ feels ‘more,’ going beyond the barriers so deeply entrenched in his culture separating men from women and the clean from the unclean. He turns to her, not away, and calls her “Daughter.” Healing takes place.

Our culture is full of equally entrenched barriers separating us from one another. Do you have the courage, the love, to see ‘more’, do ‘more’? If you are united to Christ you can act like Christ.  (Don’t you really want that?)

—Fr.Mark Henninger, S.J., a philosophy professor by trade, now serves as a pastoral care chaplain at Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL.

Prayer

Lord, touch our minds so worry is stilled. Touch our hearts, so compassion and forgiveness direct our behavior. Touch our bodies so we move with confidence. And touch our souls so we recognize the blessings of this day. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, touch our minds so worry is stilled. Touch our hearts, so compassion and forgiveness direct our behavior. Touch our bodies so we move with confidence. And touch our souls so we recognize the blessings of this day. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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June 30, 2015

First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 23-27

And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep. And they went and woke him up, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, you of little faith?” Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a dead calm. They were amazed, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Stormy Weather

The problem with writing a reflection on the gospel passage for today is to decide on which type of storms to focus. Homilists often spiritualize the problem, speaking of the internal turmoil of our emotions and thought patterns. At times, societal storms become the focus to highlight the real challenges that global climate change, oppressive social structures, or random acts of violence place on fully living our Christian vocation.

Speaking of different types of storms might suggest each category has a different origin. Whether an external or internal storm, they are intricately connected. As Jesuit St. Peter Faber once noted, the problems that human society faces have spiritual roots. Technological advances offer assistance, but only God can touch that place of fear, greed, or despair that causes these problems. We must turn to Christ like the apostles, and ask for a peace that transforms our hearts.

When I encounter the storms of a Christian vocation, where do I turn for help? Is Christ inviting me to trust him more deeply? If I am seeking peace in my life, where areas of my heart need to be transformed?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

Prayer

Living God, stand by me. Hold me up. Be my strength when I am tired, my inspiration when I am bored, my life when I am listless. Living God, I cannot always meet the standard expected of me, cannot always be the personality I am known for. Abba when I fail, Abba when I stumble, I will rest in your presence.

—Edwina Gately


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Stormy Weather

The problem with writing a reflection on the gospel passage for today is to decide on which type of storms to focus. Homilists often spiritualize the problem, speaking of the internal turmoil of our emotions and thought patterns. At times, societal storms become the focus to highlight the real challenges that global climate change, oppressive social structures, or random acts of violence place on fully living our Christian vocation.

Speaking of different types of storms might suggest each category has a different origin. Whether an external or internal storm, they are intricately connected. As Jesuit St. Peter Faber once noted, the problems that human society faces have spiritual roots. Technological advances offer assistance, but only God can touch that place of fear, greed, or despair that causes these problems. We must turn to Christ like the apostles, and ask for a peace that transforms our hearts.

When I encounter the storms of a Christian vocation, where do I turn for help? Is Christ inviting me to trust him more deeply? If I am seeking peace in my life, where areas of my heart need to be transformed?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 23-27

And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep. And they went and woke him up, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, you of little faith?” Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a dead calm. They were amazed, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Living God, stand by me. Hold me up. Be my strength when I am tired, my inspiration when I am bored, my life when I am listless. Living God, I cannot always meet the standard expected of me, cannot always be the personality I am known for. Abba when I fail, Abba when I stumble, I will rest in your presence.

—Edwina Gately


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 29, 2015

SOLEMNITY OF STS. PETER AND PAUL, Apostles

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Path to Freedom

The story of Peter’s liberation from prison is such a great story to pray with.  I enter into it with my imagination and sit next to Peter and feel the weight of the chains on my wrists and this quickly invites me to ask, “What is binding me this day?  What is keeping me imprisoned and unfree?” Then I imagine hearing the voice of the angel and seeing the light. This reminds me that I cannot free myself. I can only be open to the variety of ways the Lord may be reaching out to me, guiding me to healing. The scripture also reminds me that healing is a journey. The angel took Peter past one guard, then another. The gate leading out of the city opened and they made their way down an alley . . .

Today I invite you to consider, What has you bound or imprisoned, keeping you from being who God created you to be? Maybe an addiction, an attitude, expectations, fear, guilt or shame? What are the guards that are in the way on your journey to healing? And, maybe most importantly, can you pray for and notice God’s help on the journey?

—Amy Hoover, spiritual director and a frequent spiritual writer, is Director of the Creighton University Retreat Center, located in Griswold, IA.

Prayer

Holy Spirit, come! Open my mind to seek the truth.  Break down the barriers that imprison me.  Empower me to overcome any guilt by asking for forgiveness. Enable me to forgive others and release my past hurt and anger. Open my eyes to vices, habits, and attitudes that are destructive to me and to others. Guide me to true freedom with your Word.  Amen

—Excerpted from the Catholic Youth Bible, © St. Mary’s Press, Winona, MN, 2005.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Holy Spirit, come! Open my mind to seek the truth.  Break down the barriers that imprison me.  Empower me to overcome any guilt by asking for forgiveness. Enable me to forgive others and release my past hurt and anger. Open my eyes to vices, habits, and attitudes that are destructive to me and to others. Guide me to true freedom with your Word.  Amen

—Excerpted from the Catholic Youth Bible, © St. Mary’s Press, Winona, MN, 2005.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

SOLEMNITY OF STS. PETER AND PAUL, Apostles

Acts 12: 1-11

About that time King Herod laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He had James, the brother of John, killed with the sword. After he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. (This was during the festival of Unleavened Bread.) When he had seized him, he put him in prison and handed him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover.

While Peter was kept in prison, the church prayed fervently to God for him. The very night before Herod was going to bring him out, Peter, bound with two chains, was sleeping between two soldiers, while guards in front of the door were keeping watch over the prison. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He tapped Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his wrists. The angel said to him, “Fasten your belt and put on your sandals.” He did so. Then he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.”

Peter went out and followed him; he did not realize that what was happening with the angel’s help was real; he thought he was seeing a vision. After they had passed the first and the second guard, they came before the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went outside and walked along a lane, when suddenly the angel left him. Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hands of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Path to Freedom

The story of Peter’s liberation from prison is such a great story to pray with.  I enter into it with my imagination and sit next to Peter and feel the weight of the chains on my wrists and this quickly invites me to ask, “What is binding me this day?  What is keeping me imprisoned and unfree?” Then I imagine hearing the voice of the angel and seeing the light. This reminds me that I cannot free myself. I can only be open to the variety of ways the Lord may be reaching out to me, guiding me to healing. The scripture also reminds me that healing is a journey. The angel took Peter past one guard, then another. The gate leading out of the city opened and they made their way down an alley . . .

Today I invite you to consider, What has you bound or imprisoned, keeping you from being who God created you to be? Maybe an addiction, an attitude, expectations, fear, guilt or shame? What are the guards that are in the way on your journey to healing? And, maybe most importantly, can you pray for and notice God’s help on the journey?

—Amy Hoover, spiritual director and a frequent spiritual writer, is Director of the Creighton University Retreat Center, located in Griswold, IA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

June 28, 2015

Mk 5: 21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.” Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease.

Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’” He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James. When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly.

When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was. He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Acting Like Christ

Imagine suffering from a slow loss of blood, on and off, day after day for twelve years! And in Jesus’ time, loss of blood like this made one ritually impure, and so you became isolated from the community. Unclean!

St. Ignatius talks of the Magis: the ‘more’ that Jesus is asking of us. Look at Jesus and his Magis: though divine, he was still a first-century Jewish man, but he sees ‘more,’ feels ‘more,’ going beyond the barriers so deeply entrenched in his culture separating men from women and the clean from the unclean. He turns to her, not away, and calls her “Daughter.” Healing takes place.

Our culture is full of equally entrenched barriers separating us from one another. Do you have the courage, the love, to see ‘more’, do ‘more’? If you are united to Christ you can act like Christ.  (Don’t you really want that?)

—Fr.Mark Henninger, S.J., a philosophy professor by trade, now serves as a pastoral care chaplain at Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL.

Prayer

Lord, touch our minds so worry is stilled. Touch our hearts, so compassion and forgiveness direct our behavior. Touch our bodies so we move with confidence. And touch our souls so we recognize the blessings of this day. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, touch our minds so worry is stilled. Touch our hearts, so compassion and forgiveness direct our behavior. Touch our bodies so we move with confidence. And touch our souls so we recognize the blessings of this day. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!