July 14, 2015

St. Kateri Tekakwitha

Ex 2: 1-15a

Now a man from the house of Levi went and married a Levite woman.The woman conceived and bore a son; and when she saw that he was a fine baby, she hid him three months. When she could hide him no longer she got a papyrus basket for him, and plastered it with bitumen and pitch; she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds on the bank of the river. His sister stood at a distance, to see what would happen to him.

The daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, while her attendants walked beside the river. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her maid to bring it. When she opened it, she saw the child. He was crying, and she took pity on him, “This must be one of the Hebrews’ children,” she said. Then his sister said to Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get you a nurse from the Hebrew women to nurse the child for you?” Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Yes.”

So the girl went and called the child’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this child and nurse it for me, and I will give you your wages.” So the woman took the child and nursed it. When the child grew up, she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and she took him as her son. She named him Moses, “because,” she said, “I drew him out of the water.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Where God Invites Me

We all have a daily routine comprising essentials like waking up, preparing for the day, working, eating, and sleeping to begin the cycle anew tomorrow. For some of us, deviating from a routine is either unhealthy, unproductive, and in the worst cases, scary. The application of Ignatius’ revelation that “God is in all things” affirms the goodness of our idiosyncratic routines along with what interrupts them.

Our readings contain stories of people who experienced an interruption from their normal activities.  Pharaoh’s daughter was preparing to bathe when she saw the papyrus basket carrying Moses. Despite a return to their regular lives, the townspeople which Jesus mentions must have been originally curious about this itinerant preacher and healer. St. Kateri Tekakwitha, the saint for today, had a decision to either ignore or approach the French Jesuit missionaries who came to her village. God renews each of us through providing for our daily needs in our routines, and by presenting new opportunities to keep our lives fresh with the fragrance of the Gospel.

What is my daily routine?  When is the last time I felt God inviting me into something new away from my daily routine? What do I feel God inviting me into currently?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

Prayer

God our Father, whom Kateri Tekakwitha liked to call the Great Spirit,

We thank you for having given us this young woman as a model of Christian life.

Despite her frailness and her community’s resistance, she bore witness to the presence of Christ.

With her companions, she drew close to the elderly and to the sick.

Every day, she saw in nature a reflection of your own glory and beauty.

Grant that by her intercession we may always be close to you, more sensitive to the needs of those around us, and more respectful of creation. With her, we shall strive to discover what pleases you and endeavour to accomplish it until that day you call us back to you. Amen!

Prayer from the Shrine of St. Kateri Tekawitha, Kahnanake, Mohawk Territory, Quebec, Canada

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Find God in All Things.” —St. Ignatius


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God our Father, whom Kateri Tekakwitha liked to call the Great Spirit,

We thank you for having given us this young woman as a model of Christian life.

Despite her frailness and her community’s resistance, she bore witness to the presence of Christ.

With her companions, she drew close to the elderly and to the sick.

Every day, she saw in nature a reflection of your own glory and beauty.

Grant that by her intercession we may always be close to you, more sensitive to the needs of those around us, and more respectful of creation. With her, we shall strive to discover what pleases you and endeavour to accomplish it until that day you call us back to you. Amen!

Prayer from the Shrine of St. Kateri Tekawitha, Kahnanake, Mohawk Territory, Quebec, Canada


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Where God Invites Me

We all have a daily routine comprising essentials like waking up, preparing for the day, working, eating, and sleeping to begin the cycle anew tomorrow. For some of us, deviating from a routine is either unhealthy, unproductive, and in the worst cases, scary. The application of Ignatius’ revelation that “God is in all things” affirms the goodness of our idiosyncratic routines along with what interrupts them.

Our readings contain stories of people who experienced an interruption from their normal activities.  Pharaoh’s daughter was preparing to bathe when she saw the papyrus basket carrying Moses. Despite a return to their regular lives, the townspeople which Jesus mentions must have been originally curious about this itinerant preacher and healer. St. Kateri Tekakwitha, the saint for today, had a decision to either ignore or approach the French Jesuit missionaries who came to her village. God renews each of us through providing for our daily needs in our routines, and by presenting new opportunities to keep our lives fresh with the fragrance of the Gospel.

What is my daily routine?  When is the last time I felt God inviting me into something new away from my daily routine? What do I feel God inviting me into currently?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Kateri Tekakwitha

Ex 2: 1-15a

Now a man from the house of Levi went and married a Levite woman.The woman conceived and bore a son; and when she saw that he was a fine baby, she hid him three months. When she could hide him no longer she got a papyrus basket for him, and plastered it with bitumen and pitch; she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds on the bank of the river. His sister stood at a distance, to see what would happen to him.

The daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, while her attendants walked beside the river. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her maid to bring it. When she opened it, she saw the child. He was crying, and she took pity on him, “This must be one of the Hebrews’ children,” she said. Then his sister said to Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get you a nurse from the Hebrew women to nurse the child for you?” Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Yes.”

So the girl went and called the child’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this child and nurse it for me, and I will give you your wages.” So the woman took the child and nursed it. When the child grew up, she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and she took him as her son. She named him Moses, “because,” she said, “I drew him out of the water.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


Get our FREE App

Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
28293031   
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
    123
45678910
       
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

July 14, 2015

St. Kateri Tekakwitha

Ex 2: 1-15a

Now a man from the house of Levi went and married a Levite woman.The woman conceived and bore a son; and when she saw that he was a fine baby, she hid him three months. When she could hide him no longer she got a papyrus basket for him, and plastered it with bitumen and pitch; she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds on the bank of the river. His sister stood at a distance, to see what would happen to him.

The daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, while her attendants walked beside the river. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her maid to bring it. When she opened it, she saw the child. He was crying, and she took pity on him, “This must be one of the Hebrews’ children,” she said. Then his sister said to Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get you a nurse from the Hebrew women to nurse the child for you?” Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Yes.”

So the girl went and called the child’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this child and nurse it for me, and I will give you your wages.” So the woman took the child and nursed it. When the child grew up, she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and she took him as her son. She named him Moses, “because,” she said, “I drew him out of the water.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Where God Invites Me

We all have a daily routine comprising essentials like waking up, preparing for the day, working, eating, and sleeping to begin the cycle anew tomorrow. For some of us, deviating from a routine is either unhealthy, unproductive, and in the worst cases, scary. The application of Ignatius’ revelation that “God is in all things” affirms the goodness of our idiosyncratic routines along with what interrupts them.

Our readings contain stories of people who experienced an interruption from their normal activities.  Pharaoh’s daughter was preparing to bathe when she saw the papyrus basket carrying Moses. Despite a return to their regular lives, the townspeople which Jesus mentions must have been originally curious about this itinerant preacher and healer. St. Kateri Tekakwitha, the saint for today, had a decision to either ignore or approach the French Jesuit missionaries who came to her village. God renews each of us through providing for our daily needs in our routines, and by presenting new opportunities to keep our lives fresh with the fragrance of the Gospel.

What is my daily routine?  When is the last time I felt God inviting me into something new away from my daily routine? What do I feel God inviting me into currently?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

Prayer

God our Father, whom Kateri Tekakwitha liked to call the Great Spirit,

We thank you for having given us this young woman as a model of Christian life.

Despite her frailness and her community’s resistance, she bore witness to the presence of Christ.

With her companions, she drew close to the elderly and to the sick.

Every day, she saw in nature a reflection of your own glory and beauty.

Grant that by her intercession we may always be close to you, more sensitive to the needs of those around us, and more respectful of creation. With her, we shall strive to discover what pleases you and endeavour to accomplish it until that day you call us back to you. Amen!

Prayer from the Shrine of St. Kateri Tekawitha, Kahnanake, Mohawk Territory, Quebec, Canada

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Find God in All Things.” —St. Ignatius


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God our Father, whom Kateri Tekakwitha liked to call the Great Spirit,

We thank you for having given us this young woman as a model of Christian life.

Despite her frailness and her community’s resistance, she bore witness to the presence of Christ.

With her companions, she drew close to the elderly and to the sick.

Every day, she saw in nature a reflection of your own glory and beauty.

Grant that by her intercession we may always be close to you, more sensitive to the needs of those around us, and more respectful of creation. With her, we shall strive to discover what pleases you and endeavour to accomplish it until that day you call us back to you. Amen!

Prayer from the Shrine of St. Kateri Tekawitha, Kahnanake, Mohawk Territory, Quebec, Canada


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Where God Invites Me

We all have a daily routine comprising essentials like waking up, preparing for the day, working, eating, and sleeping to begin the cycle anew tomorrow. For some of us, deviating from a routine is either unhealthy, unproductive, and in the worst cases, scary. The application of Ignatius’ revelation that “God is in all things” affirms the goodness of our idiosyncratic routines along with what interrupts them.

Our readings contain stories of people who experienced an interruption from their normal activities.  Pharaoh’s daughter was preparing to bathe when she saw the papyrus basket carrying Moses. Despite a return to their regular lives, the townspeople which Jesus mentions must have been originally curious about this itinerant preacher and healer. St. Kateri Tekakwitha, the saint for today, had a decision to either ignore or approach the French Jesuit missionaries who came to her village. God renews each of us through providing for our daily needs in our routines, and by presenting new opportunities to keep our lives fresh with the fragrance of the Gospel.

What is my daily routine?  When is the last time I felt God inviting me into something new away from my daily routine? What do I feel God inviting me into currently?

Dano Kennedy, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Kateri Tekakwitha

Ex 2: 1-15a

Now a man from the house of Levi went and married a Levite woman.The woman conceived and bore a son; and when she saw that he was a fine baby, she hid him three months. When she could hide him no longer she got a papyrus basket for him, and plastered it with bitumen and pitch; she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds on the bank of the river. His sister stood at a distance, to see what would happen to him.

The daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, while her attendants walked beside the river. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her maid to bring it. When she opened it, she saw the child. He was crying, and she took pity on him, “This must be one of the Hebrews’ children,” she said. Then his sister said to Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get you a nurse from the Hebrew women to nurse the child for you?” Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Yes.”

So the girl went and called the child’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this child and nurse it for me, and I will give you your wages.” So the woman took the child and nursed it. When the child grew up, she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and she took him as her son. She named him Moses, “because,” she said, “I drew him out of the water.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!