September 30, 2015

St.  Jerome

Lk 9: 57-62

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

A Hard Row to Hoe

Today we honor St. Jerome (340­-420), the learned priest-monk and Doctor of the Church, for translating the Bible into Latin (the Vulgate). We also honor the fiery and intense scholar as the patron saint of people with difficult personalities.

Speaking of difficult personalities—Jesus certainly doesn’t make discipleship sound easy in our Gospel reading!

And that’s the point: God’s ways often are contrary to our human ways.

Following Jesus is not glorious or comfortable (the Son of man has nowhere to lay his head). In fact, it requires faith (let the spiritually dead bury the physically dead) and dedication (choose Jesus over even the best of human priorities).

Following Jesus requires us to put a hand to the plow and to keep our focus on the future. It may be a hard row to hoe, as the saying goes, but isn’t building the Kingdom of God worth it?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.Org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

Lord, it’s easy to speak the words, “I want to follow you wherever you go.” But then when we are called upon to sacrifice, to take a risk, to go where we never anticipated, those words are far more difficult to utter. Though our path may be covered in thorns if we say “Yes” to you, we are confident that loyalty to you will bring us an inner security. We also trust that we will realize true success because you are always at our side ultimately leading us to a far better place.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Following Jesus requires faith and dedication.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

A Hard Row to Hoe

Today we honor St. Jerome (340­-420), the learned priest-monk and Doctor of the Church, for translating the Bible into Latin (the Vulgate). We also honor the fiery and intense scholar as the patron saint of people with difficult personalities.

Speaking of difficult personalities—Jesus certainly doesn’t make discipleship sound easy in our Gospel reading!

And that’s the point: God’s ways often are contrary to our human ways.

Following Jesus is not glorious or comfortable (the Son of man has nowhere to lay his head). In fact, it requires faith (let the spiritually dead bury the physically dead) and dedication (choose Jesus over even the best of human priorities).

Following Jesus requires us to put a hand to the plow and to keep our focus on the future. It may be a hard row to hoe, as the saying goes, but isn’t building the Kingdom of God worth it?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.Org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Jerome

Lk 9: 57-62

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, it’s easy to speak the words, “I want to follow you wherever you go.” But then when we are called upon to sacrifice, to take a risk, to go where we never anticipated, those words are far more difficult to utter. Though our path may be covered in thorns if we say “Yes” to you, we are confident that loyalty to you will bring us an inner security. We also trust that we will realize true success because you are always at our side ultimately leading us to a far better place.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 29, 2015

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel & Raphael

Jn 1: 47-51

When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael asked him, “Where did you get to know me?” Jesus answered, “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Nathanael replied, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

The Goal of the Christian Life Is Joy

As we witnessed during his U.S. visit, Pope Francis is a man of high spirits and good humor—he smiles, laughs and embraces people freely. In today’s Gospel we meet the apostle Nathanael, also someone with a great sense of humor. Before this passage, Nathanael had been told that Jesus came from the insignificant town of Nazareth, a hamlet of only 200 to 400 people.

His response? “Can anything good come from Nazareth?”

We often glaze over that sentence, but it is a real insult of Jesus’ hometown. And what did Jesus do in response? Does he condemn Nathanael? Does he refuse to speak to him? Not at all! In fact he praises him saying that there is no “duplicity” in him. It’s a reminder that Jesus not only tolerated good humor, but welcomed it. In fact, Nathanael was welcomed into the circle of the apostles.

As Pope Francis reminds us so often, the goal of the Christian life is not seriousness, but something else: joy.

—Fr. James Martin, SJ, is the author of our special series of reflections in honor of Pope Francis’ visit to the U.S. Fr. Martin is associate editor of America magazine; a frequent commentator in the media; and author of many books, including, most recently, Jesus: A Pilgrimage and his novel The Abbey.

Prayer

The joy of the gospel fills the hearts and lives of all who encounter Jesus. Those who accept his offer of salvation are set free from sin, sorrow, inner emptiness and loneliness. With Christ joy is constantly born anew.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

With Christ joy is constantly born anew.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Goal of the Christian Life Is Joy

As we witnessed during his U.S. visit, Pope Francis is a man of high spirits and good humor—he smiles, laughs and embraces people freely. In today’s Gospel we meet the apostle Nathanael, also someone with a great sense of humor. Before this passage, Nathanael had been told that Jesus came from the insignificant town of Nazareth, a hamlet of only 200 to 400 people.

His response? “Can anything good come from Nazareth?”

We often glaze over that sentence, but it is a real insult of Jesus’ hometown. And what did Jesus do in response? Does he condemn Nathanael? Does he refuse to speak to him? Not at all! In fact he praises him saying that there is no “duplicity” in him. It’s a reminder that Jesus not only tolerated good humor, but welcomed it. In fact, Nathanael was welcomed into the circle of the apostles.

As Pope Francis reminds us so often, the goal of the Christian life is not seriousness, but something else: joy.

—Fr. James Martin, SJ, is the author of our special series of reflections in honor of Pope Francis’ visit to the U.S. Fr. Martin is associate editor of America magazine; a frequent commentator in the media; and author of many books, including, most recently, Jesus: A Pilgrimage and his novel The Abbey.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

The joy of the gospel fills the hearts and lives of all who encounter Jesus. Those who accept his offer of salvation are set free from sin, sorrow, inner emptiness and loneliness. With Christ joy is constantly born anew.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel & Raphael

Jn 1: 47-51

When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael asked him, “Where did you get to know me?” Jesus answered, “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Nathanael replied, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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September 30, 2015

St.  Jerome

Lk 9: 57-62

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

A Hard Row to Hoe

Today we honor St. Jerome (340­-420), the learned priest-monk and Doctor of the Church, for translating the Bible into Latin (the Vulgate). We also honor the fiery and intense scholar as the patron saint of people with difficult personalities.

Speaking of difficult personalities—Jesus certainly doesn’t make discipleship sound easy in our Gospel reading!

And that’s the point: God’s ways often are contrary to our human ways.

Following Jesus is not glorious or comfortable (the Son of man has nowhere to lay his head). In fact, it requires faith (let the spiritually dead bury the physically dead) and dedication (choose Jesus over even the best of human priorities).

Following Jesus requires us to put a hand to the plow and to keep our focus on the future. It may be a hard row to hoe, as the saying goes, but isn’t building the Kingdom of God worth it?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.Org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer

Lord, it’s easy to speak the words, “I want to follow you wherever you go.” But then when we are called upon to sacrifice, to take a risk, to go where we never anticipated, those words are far more difficult to utter. Though our path may be covered in thorns if we say “Yes” to you, we are confident that loyalty to you will bring us an inner security. We also trust that we will realize true success because you are always at our side ultimately leading us to a far better place.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Following Jesus requires faith and dedication.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

A Hard Row to Hoe

Today we honor St. Jerome (340­-420), the learned priest-monk and Doctor of the Church, for translating the Bible into Latin (the Vulgate). We also honor the fiery and intense scholar as the patron saint of people with difficult personalities.

Speaking of difficult personalities—Jesus certainly doesn’t make discipleship sound easy in our Gospel reading!

And that’s the point: God’s ways often are contrary to our human ways.

Following Jesus is not glorious or comfortable (the Son of man has nowhere to lay his head). In fact, it requires faith (let the spiritually dead bury the physically dead) and dedication (choose Jesus over even the best of human priorities).

Following Jesus requires us to put a hand to the plow and to keep our focus on the future. It may be a hard row to hoe, as the saying goes, but isn’t building the Kingdom of God worth it?

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.Org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Jerome

Lk 9: 57-62

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, it’s easy to speak the words, “I want to follow you wherever you go.” But then when we are called upon to sacrifice, to take a risk, to go where we never anticipated, those words are far more difficult to utter. Though our path may be covered in thorns if we say “Yes” to you, we are confident that loyalty to you will bring us an inner security. We also trust that we will realize true success because you are always at our side ultimately leading us to a far better place.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 29, 2015

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel & Raphael

Jn 1: 47-51

When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael asked him, “Where did you get to know me?” Jesus answered, “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Nathanael replied, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

The Goal of the Christian Life Is Joy

As we witnessed during his U.S. visit, Pope Francis is a man of high spirits and good humor—he smiles, laughs and embraces people freely. In today’s Gospel we meet the apostle Nathanael, also someone with a great sense of humor. Before this passage, Nathanael had been told that Jesus came from the insignificant town of Nazareth, a hamlet of only 200 to 400 people.

His response? “Can anything good come from Nazareth?”

We often glaze over that sentence, but it is a real insult of Jesus’ hometown. And what did Jesus do in response? Does he condemn Nathanael? Does he refuse to speak to him? Not at all! In fact he praises him saying that there is no “duplicity” in him. It’s a reminder that Jesus not only tolerated good humor, but welcomed it. In fact, Nathanael was welcomed into the circle of the apostles.

As Pope Francis reminds us so often, the goal of the Christian life is not seriousness, but something else: joy.

—Fr. James Martin, SJ, is the author of our special series of reflections in honor of Pope Francis’ visit to the U.S. Fr. Martin is associate editor of America magazine; a frequent commentator in the media; and author of many books, including, most recently, Jesus: A Pilgrimage and his novel The Abbey.

Prayer

The joy of the gospel fills the hearts and lives of all who encounter Jesus. Those who accept his offer of salvation are set free from sin, sorrow, inner emptiness and loneliness. With Christ joy is constantly born anew.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

With Christ joy is constantly born anew.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The Goal of the Christian Life Is Joy

As we witnessed during his U.S. visit, Pope Francis is a man of high spirits and good humor—he smiles, laughs and embraces people freely. In today’s Gospel we meet the apostle Nathanael, also someone with a great sense of humor. Before this passage, Nathanael had been told that Jesus came from the insignificant town of Nazareth, a hamlet of only 200 to 400 people.

His response? “Can anything good come from Nazareth?”

We often glaze over that sentence, but it is a real insult of Jesus’ hometown. And what did Jesus do in response? Does he condemn Nathanael? Does he refuse to speak to him? Not at all! In fact he praises him saying that there is no “duplicity” in him. It’s a reminder that Jesus not only tolerated good humor, but welcomed it. In fact, Nathanael was welcomed into the circle of the apostles.

As Pope Francis reminds us so often, the goal of the Christian life is not seriousness, but something else: joy.

—Fr. James Martin, SJ, is the author of our special series of reflections in honor of Pope Francis’ visit to the U.S. Fr. Martin is associate editor of America magazine; a frequent commentator in the media; and author of many books, including, most recently, Jesus: A Pilgrimage and his novel The Abbey.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

The joy of the gospel fills the hearts and lives of all who encounter Jesus. Those who accept his offer of salvation are set free from sin, sorrow, inner emptiness and loneliness. With Christ joy is constantly born anew.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel & Raphael

Jn 1: 47-51

When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael asked him, “Where did you get to know me?” Jesus answered, “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Nathanael replied, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!