September 24, 2015

Lk 9: 7-9

Now Herod the ruler heard about all that had taken place, and he was perplexed, because it was said by some that John had been raised from the dead, by some that Elijah had appeared, and by others that one of the ancient prophets had arisen. Herod said, “John I beheaded; but who is this about whom I hear such things?” And he tried to see him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Special Series: Pope Francis Visits U.S.

Mercy and Compassion

The message of Pope Francis’s pontificate has been mainly one of mercy and compassion, of understanding and forgiveness, and also of one directed towards caring for the poor and marginalized.

But not everyone is open to this message, and some of these insights, particularly around economic matters and environmental matters, can be threatening to people.

Nonetheless, even for those in opposition to these basic Christian truths, there is in all of us in innate desire to hear the word of God. We see that in our reading today. Even King Herod, one of the least palatable figures in the Gospels, wants to hear about John the Baptist. He is intrigued. In another Gospel passage we are told that Herod “liked to listen” to John the Baptist. So Herod is similar to many men and women of our time who feel drawn to the word of God, but also have a hard time accepting it.

It’s a reminder to treat each person, even people who might be opposed to the Christian message, with care.

—Fr. James Martin, SJ, is the author of our special series of reflections in honor of Pope Francis’ visit to the U.S. Fr. Martin is associate editor of America magazine;a frequent commentator in the media; and author of many books, including, most recently, Jesus: A Pilgrimage and his novel The Abbey.

Prayer

We are all sinners, but God heals us with an abundance of grace, mercy, and tenderness.
Let the Church always be a place of mercy and hope, where everyone is welcomed, loved, and forgiven.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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September 24, 2015

Lk 9: 7-9

Now Herod the ruler heard about all that had taken place, and he was perplexed, because it was said by some that John had been raised from the dead, by some that Elijah had appeared, and by others that one of the ancient prophets had arisen. Herod said, “John I beheaded; but who is this about whom I hear such things?” And he tried to see him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Special Series: Pope Francis Visits U.S.

Mercy and Compassion

The message of Pope Francis’s pontificate has been mainly one of mercy and compassion, of understanding and forgiveness, and also of one directed towards caring for the poor and marginalized.

But not everyone is open to this message, and some of these insights, particularly around economic matters and environmental matters, can be threatening to people.

Nonetheless, even for those in opposition to these basic Christian truths, there is in all of us in innate desire to hear the word of God. We see that in our reading today. Even King Herod, one of the least palatable figures in the Gospels, wants to hear about John the Baptist. He is intrigued. In another Gospel passage we are told that Herod “liked to listen” to John the Baptist. So Herod is similar to many men and women of our time who feel drawn to the word of God, but also have a hard time accepting it.

It’s a reminder to treat each person, even people who might be opposed to the Christian message, with care.

—Fr. James Martin, SJ, is the author of our special series of reflections in honor of Pope Francis’ visit to the U.S. Fr. Martin is associate editor of America magazine;a frequent commentator in the media; and author of many books, including, most recently, Jesus: A Pilgrimage and his novel The Abbey.

Prayer

We are all sinners, but God heals us with an abundance of grace, mercy, and tenderness.
Let the Church always be a place of mercy and hope, where everyone is welcomed, loved, and forgiven.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!