October 21, 2015

Lk 12: 39-48

“But know this: if the owner of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.”

Peter said, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for everyone?” And the Lord said, “Who then is the faithful and prudent manager whom his master will put in charge of his slaves, to give them their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions.

But if that slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and if he begins to beat the other slaves, men and women, and to eat and drink and get drunk, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know, and will cut him in pieces, and put him with the unfaithful. That slave who knew what his master wanted, but did not prepare himself or do what was wanted, will receive a severe beating. But the one who did not know and did what deserved a beating will receive a light beating.

From everyone to whom much has been given, much will be required; and from the one to whom much has been entrusted, even more will be demanded.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

What Would Jesus Do?

Luke’s gospel is loaded with important faith lessons:

  • Always be prepared for Christ’s coming.
  • Be a good steward of God’s treasures.
  • Be a faithful servant

On the surface, Luke’s lessons are practical. If we are prepared and remain faithful, we will find our reward and avoid punishment.

A popular Christian saying captures it this way: “Always open your door to the stranger because it might be Jesus in disguise.” But if we dig deeper, Luke is teaching us that by being faithful servants, we are called upon to serve others “and not to seek reward,” as Saint Ignatius would say, “except that of knowing that I do your will.” In other words, we open our door to the stranger because that is what Christ would do.

Today’s gospel concludes with a challenge: To whom much is given, much is expected.
How might we meet this challenge today and everyday?  

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer for Generosity

Lord, teach me to be generous;
teach me to serve you as you deserve,
to give and not to count the cost,
to fight and not to heed the wounds,
to toil and not to seek for rest,
to labor and not to seek reward,
except that of knowing that I do your will. Amen.

Saint Ignatius Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Do as Christ Would Do


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 12: 39-48

“But know this: if the owner of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.”

Peter said, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for everyone?” And the Lord said, “Who then is the faithful and prudent manager whom his master will put in charge of his slaves, to give them their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions.

But if that slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and if he begins to beat the other slaves, men and women, and to eat and drink and get drunk, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know, and will cut him in pieces, and put him with the unfaithful. That slave who knew what his master wanted, but did not prepare himself or do what was wanted, will receive a severe beating. But the one who did not know and did what deserved a beating will receive a light beating.

From everyone to whom much has been given, much will be required; and from the one to whom much has been entrusted, even more will be demanded.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, teach me to be generous;
teach me to serve you as you deserve,
to give and not to count the cost,
to fight and not to heed the wounds,
to toil and not to seek for rest,
to labor and not to seek reward,
except that of knowing that I do your will. Amen.

Saint Ignatius Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

What Would Jesus Do?

Luke’s gospel is loaded with important faith lessons:

  • Always be prepared for Christ’s coming.
  • Be a good steward of God’s treasures.
  • Be a faithful servant

On the surface, Luke’s lessons are practical. If we are prepared and remain faithful, we will find our reward and avoid punishment.

A popular Christian saying captures it this way: “Always open your door to the stranger because it might be Jesus in disguise.” But if we dig deeper, Luke is teaching us that by being faithful servants, we are called upon to serve others “and not to seek reward,” as Saint Ignatius would say, “except that of knowing that I do your will.” In other words, we open our door to the stranger because that is what Christ would do.

Today’s gospel concludes with a challenge: To whom much is given, much is expected.
How might we meet this challenge today and everyday?  

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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October 21, 2015

Lk 12: 39-48

“But know this: if the owner of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.”

Peter said, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for everyone?” And the Lord said, “Who then is the faithful and prudent manager whom his master will put in charge of his slaves, to give them their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions.

But if that slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and if he begins to beat the other slaves, men and women, and to eat and drink and get drunk, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know, and will cut him in pieces, and put him with the unfaithful. That slave who knew what his master wanted, but did not prepare himself or do what was wanted, will receive a severe beating. But the one who did not know and did what deserved a beating will receive a light beating.

From everyone to whom much has been given, much will be required; and from the one to whom much has been entrusted, even more will be demanded.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

What Would Jesus Do?

Luke’s gospel is loaded with important faith lessons:

  • Always be prepared for Christ’s coming.
  • Be a good steward of God’s treasures.
  • Be a faithful servant

On the surface, Luke’s lessons are practical. If we are prepared and remain faithful, we will find our reward and avoid punishment.

A popular Christian saying captures it this way: “Always open your door to the stranger because it might be Jesus in disguise.” But if we dig deeper, Luke is teaching us that by being faithful servants, we are called upon to serve others “and not to seek reward,” as Saint Ignatius would say, “except that of knowing that I do your will.” In other words, we open our door to the stranger because that is what Christ would do.

Today’s gospel concludes with a challenge: To whom much is given, much is expected.
How might we meet this challenge today and everyday?  

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

Prayer for Generosity

Lord, teach me to be generous;
teach me to serve you as you deserve,
to give and not to count the cost,
to fight and not to heed the wounds,
to toil and not to seek for rest,
to labor and not to seek reward,
except that of knowing that I do your will. Amen.

Saint Ignatius Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Do as Christ Would Do


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 12: 39-48

“But know this: if the owner of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.”

Peter said, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for everyone?” And the Lord said, “Who then is the faithful and prudent manager whom his master will put in charge of his slaves, to give them their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions.

But if that slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and if he begins to beat the other slaves, men and women, and to eat and drink and get drunk, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know, and will cut him in pieces, and put him with the unfaithful. That slave who knew what his master wanted, but did not prepare himself or do what was wanted, will receive a severe beating. But the one who did not know and did what deserved a beating will receive a light beating.

From everyone to whom much has been given, much will be required; and from the one to whom much has been entrusted, even more will be demanded.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, teach me to be generous;
teach me to serve you as you deserve,
to give and not to count the cost,
to fight and not to heed the wounds,
to toil and not to seek for rest,
to labor and not to seek reward,
except that of knowing that I do your will. Amen.

Saint Ignatius Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

What Would Jesus Do?

Luke’s gospel is loaded with important faith lessons:

  • Always be prepared for Christ’s coming.
  • Be a good steward of God’s treasures.
  • Be a faithful servant

On the surface, Luke’s lessons are practical. If we are prepared and remain faithful, we will find our reward and avoid punishment.

A popular Christian saying captures it this way: “Always open your door to the stranger because it might be Jesus in disguise.” But if we dig deeper, Luke is teaching us that by being faithful servants, we are called upon to serve others “and not to seek reward,” as Saint Ignatius would say, “except that of knowing that I do your will.” In other words, we open our door to the stranger because that is what Christ would do.

Today’s gospel concludes with a challenge: To whom much is given, much is expected.
How might we meet this challenge today and everyday?  

—Jeremy Langford is the director of communications for the Midwest Jesuits, founding editor of JesuitPrayer.org, and author of Seeds of Faith: Practices to Grow a Healthy Spiritual Life ©2007 Paraclete Press, Brewster, MA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!