November 30, 2015

St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Following Jesus Christ

In today’s Gospel Jesus calls two sets of brothers to abandon fishing careers and families to catch bigger fish: Andrew (whose feast is today) and his brother Simon Peter, along with James and John. All four leave abruptly: Andrew and Simon “at once,” Zebedee’s sons “immediately.” What inspires these men to pursue radically—even rashly—this stranger? Perhaps they intuited that Jesus was God, not just another guru. Maybe through his gaze they felt known, accepted and loved like never before. Possibly a promise of meaning and joy encountered something restless and empty within their souls.

The voice of Christ effected a similar radical reorientation in St. Ignatius’ life, unmasking his vanity and setting him on an entirely new path of life.

Why do I follow Jesus Christ? What aspects of his person and teachings attract me? Is there one person Jesus wants to “net” through my discipleship—by prayer and sacrifice on his behalf, by inviting her back to Mass, by an act of forgiveness or mercy during the Year of Mercy?

Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J. is Superior of the Jesuit Community at Creighton Prep, Omaha, NE.

Prayer

St. Andrew, brother of Simon Peter, you heard John the Baptist say:
“Behold the Lamb of God,” and you chose to follow Jesus.
Leaving your nets, you became a successful fisher of souls.
Lover of the Crucified Christ, you too were crucified like him.
Teach us to live and suffer for Him and to win many souls for Christ. Amen.

—a traditional prayer to St. Andrew


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Is there one person Jesus wants to “net” through my discipleship?


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

St. Andrew, brother of Simon Peter, you heard John the Baptist say:
“Behold the Lamb of God,” and you chose to follow Jesus.
Leaving your nets, you became a successful fisher of souls.
Lover of the Crucified Christ, you too were crucified like him.
Teach us to live and suffer for Him and to win many souls for Christ. Amen.

—a traditional prayer to St. Andrew


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Following Jesus Christ

In today’s Gospel Jesus calls two sets of brothers to abandon fishing careers and families to catch bigger fish: Andrew (whose feast is today) and his brother Simon Peter, along with James and John. All four leave abruptly: Andrew and Simon “at once,” Zebedee’s sons “immediately.” What inspires these men to pursue radically—even rashly—this stranger? Perhaps they intuited that Jesus was God, not just another guru. Maybe through his gaze they felt known, accepted and loved like never before. Possibly a promise of meaning and joy encountered something restless and empty within their souls.

The voice of Christ effected a similar radical reorientation in St. Ignatius’ life, unmasking his vanity and setting him on an entirely new path of life.

Why do I follow Jesus Christ? What aspects of his person and teachings attract me? Is there one person Jesus wants to “net” through my discipleship—by prayer and sacrifice on his behalf, by inviting her back to Mass, by an act of forgiveness or mercy during the Year of Mercy?

Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J. is Superior of the Jesuit Community at Creighton Prep, Omaha, NE.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 29, 2015

Lk 21: 25-28. 34- 36

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

“Be on guard so that your hearts are not weighed down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of this life, and that day catch you unexpectedly, like a trap. For it will come upon all who live on the face of the whole earth. Be alert at all times, praying that you may have the strength to escape all these things that will take place, and to stand before the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Paying Attention

One of the skills that new teachers have to learn is how to redirect a misbehaving student to the appropriate behavior by stating what the student should be doing. Often, novice teachers think it is enough to tell the drowsing student, “Please lift your head off your desk,” without realizing the importance of continuing with “and sit up, with your eyes facing the smart board.” This season of Advent that we are embarking on today is one devoted to redirecting us from drowsiness to standing erect and raising our heads; that is, to paying attention. During these weeks we’re invited to be more attentive to how God’s grace is active and alive in the world and in our lives, to take notice of even the most mundane signs that tell us our redemption is at hand.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is Professor of Education at John Carroll University, University Heights, OH,  and Rector of the John Carroll University Jesuit community.

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

During Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Paying Attention

One of the skills that new teachers have to learn is how to redirect a misbehaving student to the appropriate behavior by stating what the student should be doing. Often, novice teachers think it is enough to tell the drowsing student, “Please lift your head off your desk,” without realizing the importance of continuing with “and sit up, with your eyes facing the smart board.” This season of Advent that we are embarking on today is one devoted to redirecting us from drowsiness to standing erect and raising our heads; that is, to paying attention. During these weeks we’re invited to be more attentive to how God’s grace is active and alive in the world and in our lives, to take notice of even the most mundane signs that tell us our redemption is at hand.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is Professor of Education at John Carroll University, University Heights, OH,  and Rector of the John Carroll University Jesuit community.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 21: 25-28. 34- 36

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

“Be on guard so that your hearts are not weighed down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of this life, and that day catch you unexpectedly, like a trap. For it will come upon all who live on the face of the whole earth. Be alert at all times, praying that you may have the strength to escape all these things that will take place, and to stand before the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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November 30, 2015

St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Following Jesus Christ

In today’s Gospel Jesus calls two sets of brothers to abandon fishing careers and families to catch bigger fish: Andrew (whose feast is today) and his brother Simon Peter, along with James and John. All four leave abruptly: Andrew and Simon “at once,” Zebedee’s sons “immediately.” What inspires these men to pursue radically—even rashly—this stranger? Perhaps they intuited that Jesus was God, not just another guru. Maybe through his gaze they felt known, accepted and loved like never before. Possibly a promise of meaning and joy encountered something restless and empty within their souls.

The voice of Christ effected a similar radical reorientation in St. Ignatius’ life, unmasking his vanity and setting him on an entirely new path of life.

Why do I follow Jesus Christ? What aspects of his person and teachings attract me? Is there one person Jesus wants to “net” through my discipleship—by prayer and sacrifice on his behalf, by inviting her back to Mass, by an act of forgiveness or mercy during the Year of Mercy?

Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J. is Superior of the Jesuit Community at Creighton Prep, Omaha, NE.

Prayer

St. Andrew, brother of Simon Peter, you heard John the Baptist say:
“Behold the Lamb of God,” and you chose to follow Jesus.
Leaving your nets, you became a successful fisher of souls.
Lover of the Crucified Christ, you too were crucified like him.
Teach us to live and suffer for Him and to win many souls for Christ. Amen.

—a traditional prayer to St. Andrew


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Is there one person Jesus wants to “net” through my discipleship?


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

St. Andrew, brother of Simon Peter, you heard John the Baptist say:
“Behold the Lamb of God,” and you chose to follow Jesus.
Leaving your nets, you became a successful fisher of souls.
Lover of the Crucified Christ, you too were crucified like him.
Teach us to live and suffer for Him and to win many souls for Christ. Amen.

—a traditional prayer to St. Andrew


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Following Jesus Christ

In today’s Gospel Jesus calls two sets of brothers to abandon fishing careers and families to catch bigger fish: Andrew (whose feast is today) and his brother Simon Peter, along with James and John. All four leave abruptly: Andrew and Simon “at once,” Zebedee’s sons “immediately.” What inspires these men to pursue radically—even rashly—this stranger? Perhaps they intuited that Jesus was God, not just another guru. Maybe through his gaze they felt known, accepted and loved like never before. Possibly a promise of meaning and joy encountered something restless and empty within their souls.

The voice of Christ effected a similar radical reorientation in St. Ignatius’ life, unmasking his vanity and setting him on an entirely new path of life.

Why do I follow Jesus Christ? What aspects of his person and teachings attract me? Is there one person Jesus wants to “net” through my discipleship—by prayer and sacrifice on his behalf, by inviting her back to Mass, by an act of forgiveness or mercy during the Year of Mercy?

Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J. is Superior of the Jesuit Community at Creighton Prep, Omaha, NE.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 29, 2015

Lk 21: 25-28. 34- 36

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

“Be on guard so that your hearts are not weighed down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of this life, and that day catch you unexpectedly, like a trap. For it will come upon all who live on the face of the whole earth. Be alert at all times, praying that you may have the strength to escape all these things that will take place, and to stand before the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Paying Attention

One of the skills that new teachers have to learn is how to redirect a misbehaving student to the appropriate behavior by stating what the student should be doing. Often, novice teachers think it is enough to tell the drowsing student, “Please lift your head off your desk,” without realizing the importance of continuing with “and sit up, with your eyes facing the smart board.” This season of Advent that we are embarking on today is one devoted to redirecting us from drowsiness to standing erect and raising our heads; that is, to paying attention. During these weeks we’re invited to be more attentive to how God’s grace is active and alive in the world and in our lives, to take notice of even the most mundane signs that tell us our redemption is at hand.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is Professor of Education at John Carroll University, University Heights, OH,  and Rector of the John Carroll University Jesuit community.

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

During Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Paying Attention

One of the skills that new teachers have to learn is how to redirect a misbehaving student to the appropriate behavior by stating what the student should be doing. Often, novice teachers think it is enough to tell the drowsing student, “Please lift your head off your desk,” without realizing the importance of continuing with “and sit up, with your eyes facing the smart board.” This season of Advent that we are embarking on today is one devoted to redirecting us from drowsiness to standing erect and raising our heads; that is, to paying attention. During these weeks we’re invited to be more attentive to how God’s grace is active and alive in the world and in our lives, to take notice of even the most mundane signs that tell us our redemption is at hand.

—Fr. Martin Connell, S.J. is Professor of Education at John Carroll University, University Heights, OH,  and Rector of the John Carroll University Jesuit community.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

The Jesuit Prayer Team


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 21: 25-28. 34- 36

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

“Be on guard so that your hearts are not weighed down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of this life, and that day catch you unexpectedly, like a trap. For it will come upon all who live on the face of the whole earth. Be alert at all times, praying that you may have the strength to escape all these things that will take place, and to stand before the Son of Man.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!