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Please share the Good Word with your friends!

December 4, 2015

St. John of Damascus
Mt 9: 27-31

As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed him, crying loudly, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!” When he entered the house, the blind men came to him; and Jesus said to them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” They said to him, “Yes, Lord.” Then he touched their eyes and said, “According to your faith let it be done to you.” And their eyes were opened. Then Jesus sternly ordered them, “See that no one knows of this.” But they went away and spread the news about him throughout that district.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Blind and Trusting

In some way, we are all the blind men seeking sight in today’s Gospel reading. Maybe we have lost a job and with it, our family’s livelihood; perhaps we feel a deep calling to parenthood, but live with the devastation of infertility; maybe we live with the pain of a broken relationship. Whatever our blindness, we long for God’s healingwe ache for wholeness.

I see myself in the two blind men as they approach Jesus. But Jesus’ question, “Do you believe that I can do this?” stops me in my tracks. I wish for Jesus to heal my blindness, but I am skeptical, believing this gift will only come if I am good enough or work hard enough. Who am I to be healed?

In this time of quiet, Advent waiting, what does it feel like to sit with the tender invitation to believe that our God can do this?

—Megan Kennedy-Farrell  is on the staff of Charis Ministries in Chicago. She lives in Evanston with her husband and two children.

Prayer

For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.
O Lord of Light, our only hope of glory,
your radiance shines in all who look to you,
come light the hearts of all in dark and shadow.
For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.

—Marty Haugen, “My Soul in Stillness Waits,” © 1982, GIA Publications, Inc.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you. —Marty Haugen


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Blind and Trusting

In some way, we are all the blind men seeking sight in today’s Gospel reading. Maybe we have lost a job and with it, our family’s livelihood; perhaps we feel a deep calling to parenthood, but live with the devastation of infertility; maybe we live with the pain of a broken relationship. Whatever our blindness, we long for God’s healingwe ache for wholeness.

I see myself in the two blind men as they approach Jesus. But Jesus’ question, “Do you believe that I can do this?” stops me in my tracks. I wish for Jesus to heal my blindness, but I am skeptical, believing this gift will only come if I am good enough or work hard enough. Who am I to be healed?

In this time of quiet, Advent waiting, what does it feel like to sit with the tender invitation to believe that our God can do this?

—Megan Kennedy-Farrell  is on the staff of Charis Ministries in Chicago. She lives in Evanston with her husband and two children.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.
O Lord of Light, our only hope of glory,
your radiance shines in all who look to you,
come light the hearts of all in dark and shadow.
For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.

—Marty Haugen, “My Soul in Stillness Waits,” © 1982, GIA Publications, Inc.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. John of Damascus

Mt 9: 27-31

As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed him, crying loudly, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!” When he entered the house, the blind men came to him; and Jesus said to them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” They said to him, “Yes, Lord.” Then he touched their eyes and said, “According to your faith let it be done to you.” And their eyes were opened. Then Jesus sternly ordered them, “See that no one knows of this.” But they went away and spread the news about him throughout that district.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!

December 4, 2015

St. John of Damascus
Mt 9: 27-31

As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed him, crying loudly, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!” When he entered the house, the blind men came to him; and Jesus said to them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” They said to him, “Yes, Lord.” Then he touched their eyes and said, “According to your faith let it be done to you.” And their eyes were opened. Then Jesus sternly ordered them, “See that no one knows of this.” But they went away and spread the news about him throughout that district.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Blind and Trusting

In some way, we are all the blind men seeking sight in today’s Gospel reading. Maybe we have lost a job and with it, our family’s livelihood; perhaps we feel a deep calling to parenthood, but live with the devastation of infertility; maybe we live with the pain of a broken relationship. Whatever our blindness, we long for God’s healingwe ache for wholeness.

I see myself in the two blind men as they approach Jesus. But Jesus’ question, “Do you believe that I can do this?” stops me in my tracks. I wish for Jesus to heal my blindness, but I am skeptical, believing this gift will only come if I am good enough or work hard enough. Who am I to be healed?

In this time of quiet, Advent waiting, what does it feel like to sit with the tender invitation to believe that our God can do this?

—Megan Kennedy-Farrell  is on the staff of Charis Ministries in Chicago. She lives in Evanston with her husband and two children.

Prayer

For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.
O Lord of Light, our only hope of glory,
your radiance shines in all who look to you,
come light the hearts of all in dark and shadow.
For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.

—Marty Haugen, “My Soul in Stillness Waits,” © 1982, GIA Publications, Inc.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you. —Marty Haugen


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Blind and Trusting

In some way, we are all the blind men seeking sight in today’s Gospel reading. Maybe we have lost a job and with it, our family’s livelihood; perhaps we feel a deep calling to parenthood, but live with the devastation of infertility; maybe we live with the pain of a broken relationship. Whatever our blindness, we long for God’s healingwe ache for wholeness.

I see myself in the two blind men as they approach Jesus. But Jesus’ question, “Do you believe that I can do this?” stops me in my tracks. I wish for Jesus to heal my blindness, but I am skeptical, believing this gift will only come if I am good enough or work hard enough. Who am I to be healed?

In this time of quiet, Advent waiting, what does it feel like to sit with the tender invitation to believe that our God can do this?

—Megan Kennedy-Farrell  is on the staff of Charis Ministries in Chicago. She lives in Evanston with her husband and two children.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.
O Lord of Light, our only hope of glory,
your radiance shines in all who look to you,
come light the hearts of all in dark and shadow.
For you, O Lord, my soul in stillness waits; truly my hope is in you.

—Marty Haugen, “My Soul in Stillness Waits,” © 1982, GIA Publications, Inc.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. John of Damascus

Mt 9: 27-31

As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed him, crying loudly, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!” When he entered the house, the blind men came to him; and Jesus said to them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” They said to him, “Yes, Lord.” Then he touched their eyes and said, “According to your faith let it be done to you.” And their eyes were opened. Then Jesus sternly ordered them, “See that no one knows of this.” But they went away and spread the news about him throughout that district.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!