May 26, 2016

St. Philip Neri

Mk 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus.Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Vulnerable  Trust

In today’s gospel, a blind man is healed by Jesus. The man, Bartimaeus, shouted: “Master, I want to see.” Jesus responds, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.” When I consider this passage, I think of how vulnerable Bartimaeus must have made himself in order to cry to Jesus for help, and within a crowd no less. This vulnerability is what allowed the blind man to accept the faith that saved and healed him.

In our daily lives and in most societal circles, vulnerability is not a desired or efficient characteristic that we want to portray. It seems most acceptable to wear of a mask of pride. Instead, let’s remember to ask Jesus for the strength to get through obstacles, big or small. We must allow ourselves a certain amount of personal vulnerability to listen and trust in God.

—Mark Ehrbar is Co-Director of Music at Gesu Church, University Heights, OH.

Prayer

In the comfort of your love, I pour out to you, my Savior, the memories that haunt me, the fears that stifle me, the sickness that prevails upon me, and the frustration of all the pain that weaves about within me. Lord, help me to see your peace in my turmoil, your compassion in my sorrow, your forgiveness in my weakness, and your love in my need. Touch me, O Lord, with your healing and strength. To you, dear God, be all thanks and glory!  —Prayer to Christ the Healer


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

In the comfort of your love, I pour out to you, my Savior, the memories that haunt me, the fears that stifle me, the sickness that prevails upon me, and the frustration of all the pain that weaves about within me. Lord, help me to see your peace in my turmoil, your compassion in my sorrow, your forgiveness in my weakness, and your love in my need. Touch me, O Lord, with your healing and strength. To you, dear God, be all thanks and glory!  —Prayer to Christ the Healer


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Vulnerable Trust

In today’s gospel, a blind man is healed by Jesus. The man, Bartimaeus, shouted: “Master, I want to see.” Jesus responds, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.” When I consider this passage, I think of how vulnerable Bartimaeus must have made himself in order to cry to Jesus for help, and within a crowd no less. This vulnerability is what allowed the blind man to accept the faith that saved and healed him.

In our daily lives and in most societal circles, vulnerability is not a desired or efficient characteristic that we want to portray. It seems most acceptable to wear of a mask of pride. Instead, let’s remember to ask Jesus for the strength to get through obstacles, big or small. We must allow ourselves a certain amount of personal vulnerability to listen and trust in God.

—Mark Ehrbar is Co-Director of Music at Gesu Church, University Heights, OH.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Philip Neri

Mk 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus.Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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May 26, 2016

St. Philip Neri

Mk 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus.Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Vulnerable  Trust

In today’s gospel, a blind man is healed by Jesus. The man, Bartimaeus, shouted: “Master, I want to see.” Jesus responds, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.” When I consider this passage, I think of how vulnerable Bartimaeus must have made himself in order to cry to Jesus for help, and within a crowd no less. This vulnerability is what allowed the blind man to accept the faith that saved and healed him.

In our daily lives and in most societal circles, vulnerability is not a desired or efficient characteristic that we want to portray. It seems most acceptable to wear of a mask of pride. Instead, let’s remember to ask Jesus for the strength to get through obstacles, big or small. We must allow ourselves a certain amount of personal vulnerability to listen and trust in God.

—Mark Ehrbar is Co-Director of Music at Gesu Church, University Heights, OH.

Prayer

In the comfort of your love, I pour out to you, my Savior, the memories that haunt me, the fears that stifle me, the sickness that prevails upon me, and the frustration of all the pain that weaves about within me. Lord, help me to see your peace in my turmoil, your compassion in my sorrow, your forgiveness in my weakness, and your love in my need. Touch me, O Lord, with your healing and strength. To you, dear God, be all thanks and glory!  —Prayer to Christ the Healer


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

In the comfort of your love, I pour out to you, my Savior, the memories that haunt me, the fears that stifle me, the sickness that prevails upon me, and the frustration of all the pain that weaves about within me. Lord, help me to see your peace in my turmoil, your compassion in my sorrow, your forgiveness in my weakness, and your love in my need. Touch me, O Lord, with your healing and strength. To you, dear God, be all thanks and glory!  —Prayer to Christ the Healer


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Vulnerable Trust

In today’s gospel, a blind man is healed by Jesus. The man, Bartimaeus, shouted: “Master, I want to see.” Jesus responds, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.” When I consider this passage, I think of how vulnerable Bartimaeus must have made himself in order to cry to Jesus for help, and within a crowd no less. This vulnerability is what allowed the blind man to accept the faith that saved and healed him.

In our daily lives and in most societal circles, vulnerability is not a desired or efficient characteristic that we want to portray. It seems most acceptable to wear of a mask of pride. Instead, let’s remember to ask Jesus for the strength to get through obstacles, big or small. We must allow ourselves a certain amount of personal vulnerability to listen and trust in God.

—Mark Ehrbar is Co-Director of Music at Gesu Church, University Heights, OH.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Philip Neri

Mk 10: 46-52

They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus.Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!