Acting and Reacting

In the Gospel today we see Jesus become aware of the envy, righteousness, and cruel intentions of the Pharisees. Further, he notices that they are trying to find ways to undermine his authority, to diminish him, to destroy him. Despite this, Jesus is not deterred. Instead of losing time reacting to what the Pharisees think of him, he acts to the desires he has within him.

Oftentimes, we find ourselves worried and anxious about how others perceive us; then we react by trying to alter their perception of us. Jesus acted out of love for those around him, rather than reacting out of fear. Perhaps today we can ask Jesus for a still mind to listen to our hearts and not our worries.

When have I reacted because of the expectations of others rather than my own desires? If I was not worried about what they thought, how would I have acted? Today I resolve to act out of my loving desires rather than react out of worry or fear

 —Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

 

 

 

 


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St. Bonaventure

Mt 12: 1-8

At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the sabbath; his disciples were hungry, and they began to pluck heads of grain and to eat. When the Pharisees saw it, they said to him, “Look, your disciples are doing what is not lawful to do on the sabbath.” He said to them, “Have you not read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? He entered the house of God and ate the bread of the Presence, which it was not lawful for him or his companions to eat, but only for the priests.

Or have you not read in the law that on the sabbath the priests in the temple break the sabbath and yet are guiltless? I tell you, something greater than the temple is here. But if you had known what this means, ‘I desire mercy and not sacrifice,’ you would not have condemned the guiltless. For the Son of Man is lord of the sabbath.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 13, 2016

MT 11:25-27

At that time Jesus said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Lost and Found

At Catholic funerals you might hear: “May the angels lead you into paradise.” Lately I find myself humming, “May the angels lead you into paradox.” At the heart of God’s vision for us is paradox, like, “Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.” What could Jesus possibly mean by that?

Jesus knew the best way to comprehend paradox is through story. So, a man grew up poor. As a teenager he dreamt about the things he wanted to own. He slaved his way to attaining everything he had imagined would make him happy. When he looked out from his penthouse window he caught a glimpse of his reflection and realized he had no idea who that man was. “Never mind,” he thought, and went about dreaming of new possessions.

There is but one life, God’s life. Are you living that life?

—Tom McGrath is a spiritual director and the Director of Trade Books at Loyola Press in Chicago. Click here to enjoy Loyola Press’s “31 Days with St. Ignatius,” a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality in honor of St. Ignatius’ Feast Day on July 31. Content includes articles, blog posts, and videos to help you learn about and apply the principles of Ignatian spirituality.

Prayer

God, help me to loosen my grip on everything that does not lead me to you, for in you I find the satisfaction of my deepest longings.

—Tom McGrath


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lost and Found

At Catholic funerals you might hear: “May the angels lead you into paradise.” Lately I find myself humming, “May the angels lead you into paradox.” At the heart of God’s vision for us is paradox, like, “Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.” What could Jesus possibly mean by that?

Jesus knew the best way to comprehend paradox is through story. So, a man grew up poor. As a teenager he dreamt about the things he wanted to own. He slaved his way to attaining everything he had imagined would make him happy. When he looked out from his penthouse window he caught a glimpse of his reflection and realized he had no idea who that man was. “Never mind,” he thought, and went about dreaming of new possessions.

There is but one life, God’s life. Are you living that life?

—Tom McGrath is a spiritual director and the Director of Trade Books at Loyola Press in Chicago. Click here to enjoy Loyola Press’s “31 Days with St. Ignatius,” a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality in honor of St. Ignatius’ Feast Day on July 31. Content includes articles, blog posts, and videos to help you learn about and apply the principles of Ignatian spirituality.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God, help me to loosen my grip on everything that does not lead me to you, for in you I find the satisfaction of my deepest longings.

—Tom McGrath


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

MT 11:25-27

At that time Jesus said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Acting and Reacting

In the Gospel today we see Jesus become aware of the envy, righteousness, and cruel intentions of the Pharisees. Further, he notices that they are trying to find ways to undermine his authority, to diminish him, to destroy him. Despite this, Jesus is not deterred. Instead of losing time reacting to what the Pharisees think of him, he acts to the desires he has within him.

Oftentimes, we find ourselves worried and anxious about how others perceive us; then we react by trying to alter their perception of us. Jesus acted out of love for those around him, rather than reacting out of fear. Perhaps today we can ask Jesus for a still mind to listen to our hearts and not our worries.

When have I reacted because of the expectations of others rather than my own desires? If I was not worried about what they thought, how would I have acted? Today I resolve to act out of my loving desires rather than react out of worry or fear

 —Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Bonaventure

Mt 12: 1-8

At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the sabbath; his disciples were hungry, and they began to pluck heads of grain and to eat. When the Pharisees saw it, they said to him, “Look, your disciples are doing what is not lawful to do on the sabbath.” He said to them, “Have you not read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? He entered the house of God and ate the bread of the Presence, which it was not lawful for him or his companions to eat, but only for the priests.

Or have you not read in the law that on the sabbath the priests in the temple break the sabbath and yet are guiltless? I tell you, something greater than the temple is here. But if you had known what this means, ‘I desire mercy and not sacrifice,’ you would not have condemned the guiltless. For the Son of Man is lord of the sabbath.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 13, 2016

MT 11:25-27

At that time Jesus said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Lost and Found

At Catholic funerals you might hear: “May the angels lead you into paradise.” Lately I find myself humming, “May the angels lead you into paradox.” At the heart of God’s vision for us is paradox, like, “Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.” What could Jesus possibly mean by that?

Jesus knew the best way to comprehend paradox is through story. So, a man grew up poor. As a teenager he dreamt about the things he wanted to own. He slaved his way to attaining everything he had imagined would make him happy. When he looked out from his penthouse window he caught a glimpse of his reflection and realized he had no idea who that man was. “Never mind,” he thought, and went about dreaming of new possessions.

There is but one life, God’s life. Are you living that life?

—Tom McGrath is a spiritual director and the Director of Trade Books at Loyola Press in Chicago. Click here to enjoy Loyola Press’s “31 Days with St. Ignatius,” a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality in honor of St. Ignatius’ Feast Day on July 31. Content includes articles, blog posts, and videos to help you learn about and apply the principles of Ignatian spirituality.

Prayer

God, help me to loosen my grip on everything that does not lead me to you, for in you I find the satisfaction of my deepest longings.

—Tom McGrath


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lost and Found

At Catholic funerals you might hear: “May the angels lead you into paradise.” Lately I find myself humming, “May the angels lead you into paradox.” At the heart of God’s vision for us is paradox, like, “Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.” What could Jesus possibly mean by that?

Jesus knew the best way to comprehend paradox is through story. So, a man grew up poor. As a teenager he dreamt about the things he wanted to own. He slaved his way to attaining everything he had imagined would make him happy. When he looked out from his penthouse window he caught a glimpse of his reflection and realized he had no idea who that man was. “Never mind,” he thought, and went about dreaming of new possessions.

There is but one life, God’s life. Are you living that life?

—Tom McGrath is a spiritual director and the Director of Trade Books at Loyola Press in Chicago. Click here to enjoy Loyola Press’s “31 Days with St. Ignatius,” a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality in honor of St. Ignatius’ Feast Day on July 31. Content includes articles, blog posts, and videos to help you learn about and apply the principles of Ignatian spirituality.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God, help me to loosen my grip on everything that does not lead me to you, for in you I find the satisfaction of my deepest longings.

—Tom McGrath


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

MT 11:25-27

At that time Jesus said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!