test

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Patient Courage

Lamentation passages from the Old Testament make me uncomfortable. They are the sort of readings I like to rush through because they ask me to sit with pain and suffering. I often flee from discomfort. I respond to pain by trying to fix it. When others share their sorrows, I immediately switch into problem-solving mode.

Jeremiah shows us a different way. After suffering hunger and violence, his community seeks peace, healing, and rest from destruction. When Jeremiah laments to God, he pours out his pain, confusion, loss, and hurt. He is direct and holds nothing back. In the midst of sorrow, he faithfully turns to God for a way forward.

Being in loving solidarity with others requires that we learn to sit with them in their joys and sorrows. Embracing our Christian call to be conscientious global citizens requires that we engage with the tragedies of our world. Fostering an intimate relationship with Christ requires aligning ourselves with Jesus’ suffering and death, even as he is crucified among us today.

Ask for the grace of patient courage to sit with pain and suffering. Then, as Jeremiah did, boldly express yourself to our listening God.

—Aaron Pierre, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Wisconsin province, is currently studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Sts. Joachim and Anne, parents of the Virgin Mary

Jer 14: 17-22

You shall say to them this word: Let my eyes run down with tears night and day, and let them not cease, for the virgin daughter—my people—is struck down with a crushing blow, with a very grievous wound. If I go out into the field, look—those killed by the sword! And if I enter the city, look—those sick with famine! For both prophet and priest ply their trade throughout the land, and have no knowledge.

Have you completely rejected Judah? Does your heart loathe Zion? Why have you struck us down so that there is no healing for us? We look for peace, but find no good; for a time of healing, but there is terror instead. We acknowledge our wickedness, O Lord, the iniquity of our ancestors, for we have sinned against you. Do not spurn us, for your name’s sake; do not dishonor your glorious throne; remember and do not break your covenant with us. Can any idols of the nations bring rain? Or can the heavens give showers? Is it not you, O Lord our God? We set our hope on you, for it is you who do all this.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Our Father

Today’s gospel opens with Jesus’ praying, and then being asked to teach his disciples how to pray as John the Baptist taught his disciples to pray. What follows is Luke’s version of the Our Father. While called the “Lord’s Prayer,” neither Matthew’s nor Luke’s version is Jesus’ prayer. That prayer happens in the agony in the garden and on the cross.

This is how we are to pray. We begin with our relationship to God, really Jesus’ relationship to God as Father. And to Jesus’ Father, who is our Father. Our Father is generous, compassionate, caring, and faithful. In the prayer we are called to honor God’s name, to see the reign of God over us and our world, to forgive each other (daily or hourly?), to hope that we can be like God, faithful to and at the end.

The early Church prayed this prayer three and more times a day. Matthew’s version is part of the liturgy. When we prepare adults to be received into the Church, we give them the treasures of the Church—the Our Father and the Creed. St. Ignatius of Loyola teaches what he terms “the second method of prayer”—the Our Father—in the Spiritual Exercises. Ignatius invites us to pull the prayer apart slowly, savoring each word or phrase, letting ourselves be held in Our Father’s arms. This is a prayer for the community, even when said alone. It is a prayer of mission. It is a prayer of trust. It is a prayer of forgiveness—daily, hourly, long term, or right now.  How do you pray this prayer? How do you live this prayer?

—Fr. Jim Dixon, S.J. serves as chaplain to the Ignatian Volunteer Corps and is Superior of the Woodlawn Jesuit Residence, Chicago IL.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


Get our FREE App

Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
28293031   
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
    123
45678910
       
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

test

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Patient Courage

Lamentation passages from the Old Testament make me uncomfortable. They are the sort of readings I like to rush through because they ask me to sit with pain and suffering. I often flee from discomfort. I respond to pain by trying to fix it. When others share their sorrows, I immediately switch into problem-solving mode.

Jeremiah shows us a different way. After suffering hunger and violence, his community seeks peace, healing, and rest from destruction. When Jeremiah laments to God, he pours out his pain, confusion, loss, and hurt. He is direct and holds nothing back. In the midst of sorrow, he faithfully turns to God for a way forward.

Being in loving solidarity with others requires that we learn to sit with them in their joys and sorrows. Embracing our Christian call to be conscientious global citizens requires that we engage with the tragedies of our world. Fostering an intimate relationship with Christ requires aligning ourselves with Jesus’ suffering and death, even as he is crucified among us today.

Ask for the grace of patient courage to sit with pain and suffering. Then, as Jeremiah did, boldly express yourself to our listening God.

—Aaron Pierre, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Wisconsin province, is currently studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Sts. Joachim and Anne, parents of the Virgin Mary

Jer 14: 17-22

You shall say to them this word: Let my eyes run down with tears night and day, and let them not cease, for the virgin daughter—my people—is struck down with a crushing blow, with a very grievous wound. If I go out into the field, look—those killed by the sword! And if I enter the city, look—those sick with famine! For both prophet and priest ply their trade throughout the land, and have no knowledge.

Have you completely rejected Judah? Does your heart loathe Zion? Why have you struck us down so that there is no healing for us? We look for peace, but find no good; for a time of healing, but there is terror instead. We acknowledge our wickedness, O Lord, the iniquity of our ancestors, for we have sinned against you. Do not spurn us, for your name’s sake; do not dishonor your glorious throne; remember and do not break your covenant with us. Can any idols of the nations bring rain? Or can the heavens give showers? Is it not you, O Lord our God? We set our hope on you, for it is you who do all this.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Our Father

Today’s gospel opens with Jesus’ praying, and then being asked to teach his disciples how to pray as John the Baptist taught his disciples to pray. What follows is Luke’s version of the Our Father. While called the “Lord’s Prayer,” neither Matthew’s nor Luke’s version is Jesus’ prayer. That prayer happens in the agony in the garden and on the cross.

This is how we are to pray. We begin with our relationship to God, really Jesus’ relationship to God as Father. And to Jesus’ Father, who is our Father. Our Father is generous, compassionate, caring, and faithful. In the prayer we are called to honor God’s name, to see the reign of God over us and our world, to forgive each other (daily or hourly?), to hope that we can be like God, faithful to and at the end.

The early Church prayed this prayer three and more times a day. Matthew’s version is part of the liturgy. When we prepare adults to be received into the Church, we give them the treasures of the Church—the Our Father and the Creed. St. Ignatius of Loyola teaches what he terms “the second method of prayer”—the Our Father—in the Spiritual Exercises. Ignatius invites us to pull the prayer apart slowly, savoring each word or phrase, letting ourselves be held in Our Father’s arms. This is a prayer for the community, even when said alone. It is a prayer of mission. It is a prayer of trust. It is a prayer of forgiveness—daily, hourly, long term, or right now.  How do you pray this prayer? How do you live this prayer?

—Fr. Jim Dixon, S.J. serves as chaplain to the Ignatian Volunteer Corps and is Superior of the Woodlawn Jesuit Residence, Chicago IL.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

July 23, 2016

Mt 13: 24-30

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’

He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Inextricably Interconnected

Over the last few decades it’s become increasingly clear just how interconnected our world is. An increase in average temperature in the Arctic raises the sea level around the world. An increase in output of oil in the Middle East drops prices throughout North America. An increased awareness of violence erodes trust within our global civilization.

Jesus’ parable today brings to light the unseen networks that tie us together. Whether ecological, economic, or interpersonal, our world is inextricably interconnected. These connections beneath the surface are the root system that tie together the weeds and the wheat. They cannot be separated without causing unpredictable and inexplicable harm to each other. Jesus recognized this thousands of years ago and tried to show us how much we depend on each other.

As I go about my day, help me to be sensitive to how my life is tied to that of others: how their gain is my gain and how their loss is my loss, or, how my gain is their gain and my loss is their loss.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Yahweh, I know You are near,
standing always at my side.
You guard me from the foe.
And You lead me in ways everlasting.

Lord, You have searched my heart,
and You know when I sit and when I stand.
Your hand is upon me protecting me from death,
keeping me from harm. [Refrain]

Where can I run from Your love?
If I climb to the heavens You are there;
If I fly to the sunrise or sail beyond the sea,
still I’d find You there. [Refrain]

—Daniel L. Schutte, “You Are Near,” © 1971, administered by OCP Publications.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!