Prayer

Teach me to listen, O God, to those nearest me—
my family, my coworkers, my friends.
Help me to be aware that, no matter what words I hear,
the message is “Accept the person I am. Listen to me.”

Teach me to listen, my caring God, to those far from me—
the whisper of the hopeless, the plea of the forgotten,
the cry of the anguished.

Teach me to listen, O God my Mother, to myself.
Help me to be less afraid to trust the voice inside—
in the deepest part of me.

Teach me to listen, Holy Spirit, for your voice
in busy-ness and in boredom, in certainty and in doubt,
in noise and in silence.

Teach me, Lord, to listen. Amen.

—John Veltri, S.J.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Openness

Recently I have noticed that my own insecurities get in the way of seeing others around me as co-heirs and members of the same Body of Christ. I respond often with defensiveness or frustration because of the shortcomings I perceive in others. And being quick to judge others’ shortcomings allows me to be prepared if my own shortcomings are pointed out.  

But in today’s reading, I am reminded by St. Paul how rewarding humility can be, as he declares himself the least worthy. It allows for his interaction that isn’t coming from a place of tense defensiveness, but of openness to seeing the greatness and expansiveness of the Body of Christ. We recognize that the constraints we put on one another do not deepen the graces of the Holy Spirit but often limit our understanding of those gifts.

Spend a moment today to see the gifts of those whose shortcomings  you may usually recognize.

—Griffin Knipp serves as Campus Minister and Coordinator of Student Life at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Milwaukee WI.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Sts. Isaac Jogues, John de Brébeuf, and Companions, Jesuit martyr

Eph 3: 2-12

For surely you have already heard of the commission of God’s grace that was given to me for you, and how the mystery was made known to me by revelation, as I wrote above in a few words, a reading of which will enable you to perceive my understanding of the mystery of Christ. In former generations this mystery was not made known to humankind, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit: that is, the Gentiles have become fellow-heirs, members of the same body, and sharers in the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel.

Of this gospel I have become a servant according to the gift of God’s grace that was given to me by the working of his power. Although I am the very least of all the saints, this grace was given to me to bring to the Gentiles the news of the boundless riches of Christ, and to make everyone see what is the plan of the mystery hidden for ages in God who created all things; so that through the church the wisdom of God in its rich variety might now be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly places. This was in accordance with the eternal purpose that he has carried out in Christ Jesus our Lord, in whom we have access to God in boldness and confidence through faith in him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

St. Therese, flower of fervor and love, please intercede for us.
Fill our hearts with your pure love of God.
As we celebrate your feast day,
make us more aware of the goodness of God
and how well He tends His garden.
Instill in us your little way of doing 
ordinary things with extraordinary love.

—Carmelite novena prayer to St. Therese of Lisieux

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Returning to God

With Job we see someone who always returns to God. This gives me hope when our days and our newsfeeds are filled with so much suffering. How can I possibly see God in all this? Wave after wave of refugees and their children forced to make the impossible choice. And when we are given the opportunity to practice hospitality and empathy, so many respond in fear and trepidation.

We will not always understand why suffering seems so great in our world. We are dealing with things ‘that we do not understand,’ like Job. It’s a way of understanding that God is with us even when we can’t or refuse to see God. It is part of the mystery of redemption. Job always found a way to return to God during or after a time of suffering. How can I return to the knowledge of God’s love for me and act out of that love?

—Emily Schumacher-Novak lives in Milwaukee, WI, and works in Jesuit Higher Education and Ignatian Spirituality.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Jb 42: 1-3. 5-6. 12-17

Then Job answered the Lord: “I know that you can do all things, and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted. ‘Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge?’ Therefore I have uttered what I did not understand, things too wonderful for me, which I did not know. I had heard of you by the hearing of the ear, but now my eye sees you; therefore I despise myself, and repent in dust and ashes.”

The Lord blessed the latter days of Job more than his beginning; and he had fourteen thousand sheep, six thousand camels, a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand donkeys. He also had seven sons and three daughters. He named the first Jemimah, the second Keziah, and the third Keren-happuch. In all the land there were no women so beautiful as Job’s daughters; and their father gave them an inheritance along with their brothers. After this Job lived one hundred and forty years, and saw his children, and his children’s children, four generations. And Job died, old and full of days.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

October 19, 2016

Please refer to this email for the correct content for Oct 19, 2016.  May our Lord’s presence guide you throughout the moments of your day.

Sts. Isaac Jogues, John de Brébeuf, and Companions, Jesuit martyr

Eph 3: 2-12

For surely you have already heard of the commission of God’s grace that was given to me for you, and how the mystery was made known to me by revelation, as I wrote above in a few words, a reading of which will enable you to perceive my understanding of the mystery of Christ. In former generations this mystery was not made known to humankind, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit: that is, the Gentiles have become fellow-heirs, members of the same body, and sharers in the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel.

Of this gospel I have become a servant according to the gift of God’s grace that was given to me by the working of his power. Although I am the very least of all the saints, this grace was given to me to bring to the Gentiles the news of the boundless riches of Christ, and to make everyone see what is the plan of the mystery hidden for ages in God who created all things; so that through the church the wisdom of God in its rich variety might now be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly places. This was in accordance with the eternal purpose that he has carried out in Christ Jesus our Lord, in whom we have access to God in boldness and confidence through faith in him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Openness

Recently I have noticed that my own insecurities get in the way of seeing others around me as co-heirs and members of the same Body of Christ. I respond often with defensiveness or frustration because of the shortcomings I perceive in others. And being quick to judge others’ shortcomings allows me to be prepared if my own shortcomings are pointed out.

But in today’s reading, I am reminded by St. Paul how rewarding humility can be, as he declares himself the least worthy. It allows for his interaction that isn’t coming from a place of tense defensiveness, but of openness to seeing the greatness and expansiveness of the Body of Christ. We recognize that the constraints we put on one another do not deepen the graces of the Holy Spirit but often limit our understanding of those gifts.

Spend a moment today to see the gifts of those whose shortcomings  you may usually recognize.

—Griffin Knipp serves as Campus Minister and Coordinator of Student Life at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Milwaukee WI.

Prayer

Teach me to listen, O God, to those nearest me—
my family, my coworkers, my friends.
Help me to be aware that, no matter what words I hear,
the message is “Accept the person I am. Listen to me.”

Teach me to listen, my caring God, to those far from me—
the whisper of the hopeless, the plea of the forgotten,
the cry of the anguished.

Teach me to listen, O God my Mother, to myself.
Help me to be less afraid to trust the voice inside—
in the deepest part of me.

Teach me to listen, Holy Spirit, for your voice
in busy-ness and in boredom, in certainty and in doubt,
in noise and in silence.

Teach me, Lord, to listen. Amen.

—John Veltri, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to FaithCP

Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Prayer

Teach me to listen, O God, to those nearest me—
my family, my coworkers, my friends.
Help me to be aware that, no matter what words I hear,
the message is “Accept the person I am. Listen to me.”

Teach me to listen, my caring God, to those far from me—
the whisper of the hopeless, the plea of the forgotten,
the cry of the anguished.

Teach me to listen, O God my Mother, to myself.
Help me to be less afraid to trust the voice inside—
in the deepest part of me.

Teach me to listen, Holy Spirit, for your voice
in busy-ness and in boredom, in certainty and in doubt,
in noise and in silence.

Teach me, Lord, to listen. Amen.

—John Veltri, S.J.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Openness

Recently I have noticed that my own insecurities get in the way of seeing others around me as co-heirs and members of the same Body of Christ. I respond often with defensiveness or frustration because of the shortcomings I perceive in others. And being quick to judge others’ shortcomings allows me to be prepared if my own shortcomings are pointed out.  

But in today’s reading, I am reminded by St. Paul how rewarding humility can be, as he declares himself the least worthy. It allows for his interaction that isn’t coming from a place of tense defensiveness, but of openness to seeing the greatness and expansiveness of the Body of Christ. We recognize that the constraints we put on one another do not deepen the graces of the Holy Spirit but often limit our understanding of those gifts.

Spend a moment today to see the gifts of those whose shortcomings  you may usually recognize.

—Griffin Knipp serves as Campus Minister and Coordinator of Student Life at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Milwaukee WI.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Sts. Isaac Jogues, John de Brébeuf, and Companions, Jesuit martyr

Eph 3: 2-12

For surely you have already heard of the commission of God’s grace that was given to me for you, and how the mystery was made known to me by revelation, as I wrote above in a few words, a reading of which will enable you to perceive my understanding of the mystery of Christ. In former generations this mystery was not made known to humankind, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit: that is, the Gentiles have become fellow-heirs, members of the same body, and sharers in the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel.

Of this gospel I have become a servant according to the gift of God’s grace that was given to me by the working of his power. Although I am the very least of all the saints, this grace was given to me to bring to the Gentiles the news of the boundless riches of Christ, and to make everyone see what is the plan of the mystery hidden for ages in God who created all things; so that through the church the wisdom of God in its rich variety might now be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly places. This was in accordance with the eternal purpose that he has carried out in Christ Jesus our Lord, in whom we have access to God in boldness and confidence through faith in him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

St. Therese, flower of fervor and love, please intercede for us.
Fill our hearts with your pure love of God.
As we celebrate your feast day,
make us more aware of the goodness of God
and how well He tends His garden.
Instill in us your little way of doing 
ordinary things with extraordinary love.

—Carmelite novena prayer to St. Therese of Lisieux

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Returning to God

With Job we see someone who always returns to God. This gives me hope when our days and our newsfeeds are filled with so much suffering. How can I possibly see God in all this? Wave after wave of refugees and their children forced to make the impossible choice. And when we are given the opportunity to practice hospitality and empathy, so many respond in fear and trepidation.

We will not always understand why suffering seems so great in our world. We are dealing with things ‘that we do not understand,’ like Job. It’s a way of understanding that God is with us even when we can’t or refuse to see God. It is part of the mystery of redemption. Job always found a way to return to God during or after a time of suffering. How can I return to the knowledge of God’s love for me and act out of that love?

—Emily Schumacher-Novak lives in Milwaukee, WI, and works in Jesuit Higher Education and Ignatian Spirituality.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Jb 42: 1-3. 5-6. 12-17

Then Job answered the Lord: “I know that you can do all things, and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted. ‘Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge?’ Therefore I have uttered what I did not understand, things too wonderful for me, which I did not know. I had heard of you by the hearing of the ear, but now my eye sees you; therefore I despise myself, and repent in dust and ashes.”

The Lord blessed the latter days of Job more than his beginning; and he had fourteen thousand sheep, six thousand camels, a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand donkeys. He also had seven sons and three daughters. He named the first Jemimah, the second Keziah, and the third Keren-happuch. In all the land there were no women so beautiful as Job’s daughters; and their father gave them an inheritance along with their brothers. After this Job lived one hundred and forty years, and saw his children, and his children’s children, four generations. And Job died, old and full of days.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

October 19, 2016

Please refer to this email for the correct content for Oct 19, 2016.  May our Lord’s presence guide you throughout the moments of your day.

Sts. Isaac Jogues, John de Brébeuf, and Companions, Jesuit martyr

Eph 3: 2-12

For surely you have already heard of the commission of God’s grace that was given to me for you, and how the mystery was made known to me by revelation, as I wrote above in a few words, a reading of which will enable you to perceive my understanding of the mystery of Christ. In former generations this mystery was not made known to humankind, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit: that is, the Gentiles have become fellow-heirs, members of the same body, and sharers in the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel.

Of this gospel I have become a servant according to the gift of God’s grace that was given to me by the working of his power. Although I am the very least of all the saints, this grace was given to me to bring to the Gentiles the news of the boundless riches of Christ, and to make everyone see what is the plan of the mystery hidden for ages in God who created all things; so that through the church the wisdom of God in its rich variety might now be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly places. This was in accordance with the eternal purpose that he has carried out in Christ Jesus our Lord, in whom we have access to God in boldness and confidence through faith in him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Openness

Recently I have noticed that my own insecurities get in the way of seeing others around me as co-heirs and members of the same Body of Christ. I respond often with defensiveness or frustration because of the shortcomings I perceive in others. And being quick to judge others’ shortcomings allows me to be prepared if my own shortcomings are pointed out.

But in today’s reading, I am reminded by St. Paul how rewarding humility can be, as he declares himself the least worthy. It allows for his interaction that isn’t coming from a place of tense defensiveness, but of openness to seeing the greatness and expansiveness of the Body of Christ. We recognize that the constraints we put on one another do not deepen the graces of the Holy Spirit but often limit our understanding of those gifts.

Spend a moment today to see the gifts of those whose shortcomings  you may usually recognize.

—Griffin Knipp serves as Campus Minister and Coordinator of Student Life at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Milwaukee WI.

Prayer

Teach me to listen, O God, to those nearest me—
my family, my coworkers, my friends.
Help me to be aware that, no matter what words I hear,
the message is “Accept the person I am. Listen to me.”

Teach me to listen, my caring God, to those far from me—
the whisper of the hopeless, the plea of the forgotten,
the cry of the anguished.

Teach me to listen, O God my Mother, to myself.
Help me to be less afraid to trust the voice inside—
in the deepest part of me.

Teach me to listen, Holy Spirit, for your voice
in busy-ness and in boredom, in certainty and in doubt,
in noise and in silence.

Teach me, Lord, to listen. Amen.

—John Veltri, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!