Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord our God, grant that we may be ready
to receive Christ when he comes in glory
and to share in the banquet of heaven.  Amen.

—An Advent prayer

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

What Love Requires

Pretty much throughout my school years I felt called to excel academically. For several years I felt called to become a Jesuit priest. The call to marriage and children became stronger than the call to religious life. In business I felt called to work hard for the company, customers and society. I have felt called in so many different ways during the course of my life. I suspect you may have the same experience.

So what is the call of Andrew, Peter, James and John we read about in today’s gospel, and how does it relate to the various callings I have experienced?

As I reflect on my “callings” they have a couple of things in common; using the talents God has given me to the fullest; and constantly asking and answering the question “what does love require.” God creates us from his infinite, pure and unconditional love. He calls us to share that love with the people he puts in our lives and those who are marginalized.

The call of the Kingdom never ceases and it is always about love as we live it concretely in our everyday lives.

—David McNulty serves as Assistant for Operations at the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit Province.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Andrew, ap F

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 30, 2016

Andrew, ap F

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

What Love Requires

Pretty much throughout my school years I felt called to excel academically. For several years I felt called to become a Jesuit priest. The call to marriage and children became stronger than the call to religious life. In business I felt called to work hard for the company, customers and society. I have felt called in so many different ways during the course of my life. I suspect you may have the same experience.

So what is the call of Andrew, Peter, James and John we read about in today’s gospel, and how does it relate to the various callings I have experienced?

As I reflect on my “callings” they have a couple of things in common; using the talents God has given me to the fullest; and constantly asking and answering the question “what does love require.” God creates us from his infinite, pure and unconditional love. He calls us to share that love with the people he puts in our lives and those who are marginalized.

The call of the Kingdom never ceases and it is always about love as we live it concretely in our everyday lives.

—David McNulty serves as Assistant for Operations at the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit Province.

Prayer

Lord our God, grant that we may be ready
to receive Christ when he comes in glory
and to share in the banquet of heaven.  Amen.

—An Advent prayer

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

So Simple

What a comfort it is to hear Jesus say that the starting point of our faith is so simple that it is best received by “little ones.” God gives us gifts such as wisdom and learning, yet the beginning of our relationship with God lies in this simple openness to God, a beginning to which we must return time and time again.

What is it like to receive God as a little one? I imagine it’s a lot like the moment when God’s light shines on a fallow field within our heart or our world, unimportant and forgotten, populated by a few sheep and a few shepherds, so flooding it with joy that it comes to know its own dignity in an instant.

Today I give thanks for the “little ones,” the fallow fields of our hearts and our world that await the arrival of joy.

— Ryen Dwyer, S.J., a Chicago-Detroit province Jesuit scholastic, is currently studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 10: 21-24

At that same hour Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.” Then turning to the disciples, Jesus said to them privately, “Blessed are the eyes that see what you see! For I tell you that many prophets and kings desired to see what you see, but did not see it, and to hear what you hear, but did not hear it.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 29, 2016

Lk 10: 21-24

At that same hour Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.” Then turning to the disciples, Jesus said to them privately, “Blessed are the eyes that see what you see! For I tell you that many prophets and kings desired to see what you see, but did not see it, and to hear what you hear, but did not hear it.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

So Simple

What a comfort it is to hear Jesus say that the starting point of our faith is so simple that it is best received by “little ones.” God gives us gifts such as wisdom and learning, yet the beginning of our relationship with God lies in this simple openness to God, a beginning to which we must return time and time again.

What is it like to receive God as a little one? I imagine it’s a lot like the moment when God’s light shines on a fallow field within our heart or our world, unimportant and forgotten, populated by a few sheep and a few shepherds, so flooding it with joy that it comes to know its own dignity in an instant.

Today I give thanks for the “little ones,” the fallow fields of our hearts and our world that await the arrival of joy.

— Ryen Dwyer, S.J., a Chicago-Detroit province Jesuit scholastic, is currently studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord our God, grant that we may be ready
to receive Christ when he comes in glory
and to share in the banquet of heaven.  Amen.

—An Advent prayer

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

What Love Requires

Pretty much throughout my school years I felt called to excel academically. For several years I felt called to become a Jesuit priest. The call to marriage and children became stronger than the call to religious life. In business I felt called to work hard for the company, customers and society. I have felt called in so many different ways during the course of my life. I suspect you may have the same experience.

So what is the call of Andrew, Peter, James and John we read about in today’s gospel, and how does it relate to the various callings I have experienced?

As I reflect on my “callings” they have a couple of things in common; using the talents God has given me to the fullest; and constantly asking and answering the question “what does love require.” God creates us from his infinite, pure and unconditional love. He calls us to share that love with the people he puts in our lives and those who are marginalized.

The call of the Kingdom never ceases and it is always about love as we live it concretely in our everyday lives.

—David McNulty serves as Assistant for Operations at the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit Province.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Andrew, ap F

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 30, 2016

Andrew, ap F

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

What Love Requires

Pretty much throughout my school years I felt called to excel academically. For several years I felt called to become a Jesuit priest. The call to marriage and children became stronger than the call to religious life. In business I felt called to work hard for the company, customers and society. I have felt called in so many different ways during the course of my life. I suspect you may have the same experience.

So what is the call of Andrew, Peter, James and John we read about in today’s gospel, and how does it relate to the various callings I have experienced?

As I reflect on my “callings” they have a couple of things in common; using the talents God has given me to the fullest; and constantly asking and answering the question “what does love require.” God creates us from his infinite, pure and unconditional love. He calls us to share that love with the people he puts in our lives and those who are marginalized.

The call of the Kingdom never ceases and it is always about love as we live it concretely in our everyday lives.

—David McNulty serves as Assistant for Operations at the Chicago-Detroit Jesuit Province.

Prayer

Lord our God, grant that we may be ready
to receive Christ when he comes in glory
and to share in the banquet of heaven.  Amen.

—An Advent prayer

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

So Simple

What a comfort it is to hear Jesus say that the starting point of our faith is so simple that it is best received by “little ones.” God gives us gifts such as wisdom and learning, yet the beginning of our relationship with God lies in this simple openness to God, a beginning to which we must return time and time again.

What is it like to receive God as a little one? I imagine it’s a lot like the moment when God’s light shines on a fallow field within our heart or our world, unimportant and forgotten, populated by a few sheep and a few shepherds, so flooding it with joy that it comes to know its own dignity in an instant.

Today I give thanks for the “little ones,” the fallow fields of our hearts and our world that await the arrival of joy.

— Ryen Dwyer, S.J., a Chicago-Detroit province Jesuit scholastic, is currently studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 10: 21-24

At that same hour Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.” Then turning to the disciples, Jesus said to them privately, “Blessed are the eyes that see what you see! For I tell you that many prophets and kings desired to see what you see, but did not see it, and to hear what you hear, but did not hear it.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 29, 2016

Lk 10: 21-24

At that same hour Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.” Then turning to the disciples, Jesus said to them privately, “Blessed are the eyes that see what you see! For I tell you that many prophets and kings desired to see what you see, but did not see it, and to hear what you hear, but did not hear it.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

So Simple

What a comfort it is to hear Jesus say that the starting point of our faith is so simple that it is best received by “little ones.” God gives us gifts such as wisdom and learning, yet the beginning of our relationship with God lies in this simple openness to God, a beginning to which we must return time and time again.

What is it like to receive God as a little one? I imagine it’s a lot like the moment when God’s light shines on a fallow field within our heart or our world, unimportant and forgotten, populated by a few sheep and a few shepherds, so flooding it with joy that it comes to know its own dignity in an instant.

Today I give thanks for the “little ones,” the fallow fields of our hearts and our world that await the arrival of joy.

— Ryen Dwyer, S.J., a Chicago-Detroit province Jesuit scholastic, is currently studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

God, during Advent, may we remember the greatest gift ever given: your only Son, Jesus Christ. Fill our hearts with wonder and gratitude as we think of our Savior putting aside his heavenly glory and coming among us. As we prepare to celebrate Christmas, grow our understanding about the impact of our Lord’s birth. By Christmas day, may our hearts overflow with thanksgiving as we embrace the greatest of all  promises: God with us!

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!