Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Christ has no body now but yours; no hands, no feet on earth, but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which He looks with compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which He walks to do good;
Yours are the hands with which He blesses all the world.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

—St. Teresa of Avila

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mercy and Compassion

Pope Francis continues to draw the world’s attention to those who are poor and in need. He invites us to reach out to others with mercy and compassion. Each of us has a story: each of us has moments of brilliance and success, as well as times we are definitely poor and in need. It is precisely in such moments when we genuinely need the “mercy and compassion” about which Pope Francis speaks.

Today’s psalm reminds us that the needy will not be forgotten; those afflicted in any way will find hope. Tomorrow’s feast of Christ, the king and center of our lives, invites us to bring that part of our hearts that is afflicted or in need to the heart of Jesus. So what would happen if I invite Jesus into that part of myself where I experience doubt and shame and fear? What difference would there be if I let Jesus transform my anxieties and fears precisely through his life-giving mercy and holy compassion? And could it be that my own heart and soul become healed when I extend the compassion of Jesus, the mercy and hope of Jesus to those I live with and work with, to those I meet at work and on the street, or wherever my daily routine takes me? Come, Lord Jesus, let me be your hands and heart; help me share your mercy and compassion!

—The Jesuit prayer team

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 20: 27-40

Some Sadducees, those who say there is no resurrection, came to him and asked him a question, “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man’s brother dies, leaving a wife but no children, the man shall marry the widow and raise up children for his brother. Now there were seven brothers; the first married, and died childless; then the second and the third married her, and so in the same way all seven died childless. Finally the woman also died.

In the resurrection, therefore, whose wife will the woman be? For the seven had married her.” Jesus said to them, “Those who belong to this age marry and are given in marriage; but those who are considered worthy of a place in that age and in the resurrection from the dead neither marry nor are given in marriage. Indeed they cannot die anymore, because they are like angels and are children of God, being children of the resurrection. And the fact that the dead are raised Moses himself showed, in the story about the bush, where he speaks of the Lord as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Now he is God not of the dead, but of the living; for to him all of them are alive.”

Then some of the scribes answered, “Teacher, you have spoken well.” For they no longer dared to ask him another question.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 19, 2016

Lk 20: 27-40

Some Sadducees, those who say there is no resurrection, came to him and asked him a question, “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man’s brother dies, leaving a wife but no children, the man shall marry the widow and raise up children for his brother. Now there were seven brothers; the first married, and died childless; then the second and the third married her, and so in the same way all seven died childless. Finally the woman also died.

In the resurrection, therefore, whose wife will the woman be? For the seven had married her.” Jesus said to them, “Those who belong to this age marry and are given in marriage; but those who are considered worthy of a place in that age and in the resurrection from the dead neither marry nor are given in marriage. Indeed they cannot die anymore, because they are like angels and are children of God, being children of the resurrection. And the fact that the dead are raised Moses himself showed, in the story about the bush, where he speaks of the Lord as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Now he is God not of the dead, but of the living; for to him all of them are alive.”

Then some of the scribes answered, “Teacher, you have spoken well.” For they no longer dared to ask him another question.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Mercy and Compassion

Pope Francis continues to draw the world’s attention to those who are poor and in need. He invites us to reach out to others with mercy and compassion. Each of us has a story: each of us has moments of brilliance and success, as well as times we are definitely poor and in need. It is precisely in such moments when we genuinely need the “mercy and compassion” about which Pope Francis speaks.

Today’s psalm reminds us that the needy will not be forgotten; those afflicted in any way will find hope. Tomorrow’s feast of Christ, the king and center of our lives, invites us to bring that part of our hearts that is afflicted or in need to the heart of Jesus. So what would happen if I invite Jesus into that part of myself where I experience doubt and shame and fear? What difference would there be if I let Jesus transform my anxieties and fears precisely through his life-giving mercy and holy compassion? And could it be that my own heart and soul become healed when I extend the compassion of Jesus, the mercy and hope of Jesus to those I live with and work with, to those I meet at work and on the street, or wherever my daily routine takes me? Come, Lord Jesus, let me be your hands and heart; help me share your mercy and compassion!

—The Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

Christ has no body now but yours; no hands, no feet on earth, but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which He looks with compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which He walks to do good;
Yours are the hands with which He blesses all the world.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

—St. Teresa of Avila

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Christ has no body now but yours; no hands, no feet on earth, but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which He looks with compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which He walks to do good;
Yours are the hands with which He blesses all the world.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

—St. Teresa of Avila

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Mercy and Compassion

Pope Francis continues to draw the world’s attention to those who are poor and in need. He invites us to reach out to others with mercy and compassion. Each of us has a story: each of us has moments of brilliance and success, as well as times we are definitely poor and in need. It is precisely in such moments when we genuinely need the “mercy and compassion” about which Pope Francis speaks.

Today’s psalm reminds us that the needy will not be forgotten; those afflicted in any way will find hope. Tomorrow’s feast of Christ, the king and center of our lives, invites us to bring that part of our hearts that is afflicted or in need to the heart of Jesus. So what would happen if I invite Jesus into that part of myself where I experience doubt and shame and fear? What difference would there be if I let Jesus transform my anxieties and fears precisely through his life-giving mercy and holy compassion? And could it be that my own heart and soul become healed when I extend the compassion of Jesus, the mercy and hope of Jesus to those I live with and work with, to those I meet at work and on the street, or wherever my daily routine takes me? Come, Lord Jesus, let me be your hands and heart; help me share your mercy and compassion!

—The Jesuit prayer team

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 20: 27-40

Some Sadducees, those who say there is no resurrection, came to him and asked him a question, “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man’s brother dies, leaving a wife but no children, the man shall marry the widow and raise up children for his brother. Now there were seven brothers; the first married, and died childless; then the second and the third married her, and so in the same way all seven died childless. Finally the woman also died.

In the resurrection, therefore, whose wife will the woman be? For the seven had married her.” Jesus said to them, “Those who belong to this age marry and are given in marriage; but those who are considered worthy of a place in that age and in the resurrection from the dead neither marry nor are given in marriage. Indeed they cannot die anymore, because they are like angels and are children of God, being children of the resurrection. And the fact that the dead are raised Moses himself showed, in the story about the bush, where he speaks of the Lord as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Now he is God not of the dead, but of the living; for to him all of them are alive.”

Then some of the scribes answered, “Teacher, you have spoken well.” For they no longer dared to ask him another question.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

November 19, 2016

Lk 20: 27-40

Some Sadducees, those who say there is no resurrection, came to him and asked him a question, “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man’s brother dies, leaving a wife but no children, the man shall marry the widow and raise up children for his brother. Now there were seven brothers; the first married, and died childless; then the second and the third married her, and so in the same way all seven died childless. Finally the woman also died.

In the resurrection, therefore, whose wife will the woman be? For the seven had married her.” Jesus said to them, “Those who belong to this age marry and are given in marriage; but those who are considered worthy of a place in that age and in the resurrection from the dead neither marry nor are given in marriage. Indeed they cannot die anymore, because they are like angels and are children of God, being children of the resurrection. And the fact that the dead are raised Moses himself showed, in the story about the bush, where he speaks of the Lord as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Now he is God not of the dead, but of the living; for to him all of them are alive.”

Then some of the scribes answered, “Teacher, you have spoken well.” For they no longer dared to ask him another question.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Mercy and Compassion

Pope Francis continues to draw the world’s attention to those who are poor and in need. He invites us to reach out to others with mercy and compassion. Each of us has a story: each of us has moments of brilliance and success, as well as times we are definitely poor and in need. It is precisely in such moments when we genuinely need the “mercy and compassion” about which Pope Francis speaks.

Today’s psalm reminds us that the needy will not be forgotten; those afflicted in any way will find hope. Tomorrow’s feast of Christ, the king and center of our lives, invites us to bring that part of our hearts that is afflicted or in need to the heart of Jesus. So what would happen if I invite Jesus into that part of myself where I experience doubt and shame and fear? What difference would there be if I let Jesus transform my anxieties and fears precisely through his life-giving mercy and holy compassion? And could it be that my own heart and soul become healed when I extend the compassion of Jesus, the mercy and hope of Jesus to those I live with and work with, to those I meet at work and on the street, or wherever my daily routine takes me? Come, Lord Jesus, let me be your hands and heart; help me share your mercy and compassion!

—The Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

Christ has no body now but yours; no hands, no feet on earth, but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which He looks with compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which He walks to do good;
Yours are the hands with which He blesses all the world.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

—St. Teresa of Avila

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!