Strength and New Life

This fourth day of Lent we read encouraging words from our God, as given to us by the prophet Isaiah. What would Lent 2017 really be like for each of us if we take to heart these encouraging phrases:
“Then light shall rise for you in the darkness” … “Then the Lord will guide you always” … “He will renew your strength.” We rightly begin Lent with a sense of “giving something up” and “serving others more thoughtfully.” But today’s reading from Isaiah turns the tables on us. It reminds us that God will not be outdone in generosity. It assures us that the Lord desires both to stretch and strengthen us along this Lenten journey 2017. God longs to renew us deep within, even as we walk the way of the cross with Jesus.

Consider today those particular ways you hope the Lord will “guide you” this Lent. Bless Jesus for renewing your strength. Open your heart to the insight and grace God longs to send you these 40 days of strength and new life.

—the Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Holy God, as Lent begins, 
may I carry out in word and in deed
all that you ask and invite. Amen.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Fasting in Action

Today’s reading turns my understanding of Lenten fasting on its head. “Do you call this a fast?“  I hear surprise and even anger in this question. Do you call this a fast?! God might even ask me, regarding my attempt to give up meat again this year, or refrain from the Tuesday box of donuts we sometimes luck into at the office.  Instead, I am given alternatives. They trip down the page like poetry, a litany of justice.  Untie and break yokes. Release. Set free. Feed and shelter and clothe. Don’t turn your back on your own.

Here, fasting is not refraining or cutting out: fasting is action. Fasting is rolling up my sleeves and doing the Gospel work of justice and mercy. In the face of our current political climate, with proposed policies that embrace further yoking and oppression of the marginalized, how might I plan to act this Lent?

—Catherine Ruffing Drotleff serves as the Director of Development for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Katharine Drexel

Mt 9: 14-15

Then the disciples of John came to him, saying, “Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “The wedding guests cannot mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them, can they? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

March 3, 2017

St. Katharine Drexel

Mt 9: 14-15

Then the disciples of John came to him, saying, “Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “The wedding guests cannot mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them, can they? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Fasting in Action

Today’s reading turns my understanding of Lenten fasting on its head. “Do you call this a fast?“  I hear surprise and even anger in this question. Do you call this a fast?! God might even ask me, regarding my attempt to give up meat again this year, or refrain from the Tuesday box of donuts we sometimes luck into at the office.  Instead, I am given alternatives. They trip down the page like poetry, a litany of justice.  Untie and break yokes. Release. Set free. Feed and shelter and clothe. Don’t turn your back on your own.

Here, fasting is not refraining or cutting out: fasting is action. Fasting is rolling up my sleeves and doing the Gospel work of justice and mercy. In the face of our current political climate, with proposed policies that embrace further yoking and oppression of the marginalized, how might I plan to act this Lent?

—Catherine Ruffing Drotleff serves as the Director of Development for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

Prayer

Holy God, as Lent begins,
may I carry out in word and in deed
all that you ask and invite. Amen.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Creighton Prep and the Midwest Jesuits have partnered to create FaithCP, a daily resource for prayer. FaithCP provides daily scripture, reflections, and prayers grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.


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Strength and New Life

This fourth day of Lent we read encouraging words from our God, as given to us by the prophet Isaiah. What would Lent 2017 really be like for each of us if we take to heart these encouraging phrases:
“Then light shall rise for you in the darkness” … “Then the Lord will guide you always” … “He will renew your strength.” We rightly begin Lent with a sense of “giving something up” and “serving others more thoughtfully.” But today’s reading from Isaiah turns the tables on us. It reminds us that God will not be outdone in generosity. It assures us that the Lord desires both to stretch and strengthen us along this Lenten journey 2017. God longs to renew us deep within, even as we walk the way of the cross with Jesus.

Consider today those particular ways you hope the Lord will “guide you” this Lent. Bless Jesus for renewing your strength. Open your heart to the insight and grace God longs to send you these 40 days of strength and new life.

—the Jesuit Prayer Team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Holy God, as Lent begins, 
may I carry out in word and in deed
all that you ask and invite. Amen.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Fasting in Action

Today’s reading turns my understanding of Lenten fasting on its head. “Do you call this a fast?“  I hear surprise and even anger in this question. Do you call this a fast?! God might even ask me, regarding my attempt to give up meat again this year, or refrain from the Tuesday box of donuts we sometimes luck into at the office.  Instead, I am given alternatives. They trip down the page like poetry, a litany of justice.  Untie and break yokes. Release. Set free. Feed and shelter and clothe. Don’t turn your back on your own.

Here, fasting is not refraining or cutting out: fasting is action. Fasting is rolling up my sleeves and doing the Gospel work of justice and mercy. In the face of our current political climate, with proposed policies that embrace further yoking and oppression of the marginalized, how might I plan to act this Lent?

—Catherine Ruffing Drotleff serves as the Director of Development for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Katharine Drexel

Mt 9: 14-15

Then the disciples of John came to him, saying, “Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “The wedding guests cannot mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them, can they? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

March 3, 2017

St. Katharine Drexel

Mt 9: 14-15

Then the disciples of John came to him, saying, “Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “The wedding guests cannot mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them, can they? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Fasting in Action

Today’s reading turns my understanding of Lenten fasting on its head. “Do you call this a fast?“  I hear surprise and even anger in this question. Do you call this a fast?! God might even ask me, regarding my attempt to give up meat again this year, or refrain from the Tuesday box of donuts we sometimes luck into at the office.  Instead, I am given alternatives. They trip down the page like poetry, a litany of justice.  Untie and break yokes. Release. Set free. Feed and shelter and clothe. Don’t turn your back on your own.

Here, fasting is not refraining or cutting out: fasting is action. Fasting is rolling up my sleeves and doing the Gospel work of justice and mercy. In the face of our current political climate, with proposed policies that embrace further yoking and oppression of the marginalized, how might I plan to act this Lent?

—Catherine Ruffing Drotleff serves as the Director of Development for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

Prayer

Holy God, as Lent begins,
may I carry out in word and in deed
all that you ask and invite. Amen.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!