April 26, 2017

Jn 3: 16-21

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life. “Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. Those who believe in him are not condemned; but those who do not believe are condemned already, because they have not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

And this is the judgment, that the light has come into the world, and people loved darkness rather than light because their deeds were evil. For all who do evil hate the light and do not come to the light, so that their deeds may not be exposed. But those who do what is true come to the light, so that it may be clearly seen that their deeds have been done in God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Darkness and Light

Images of lightness and darkness are used throughout scripture. Darkness is not always bad. In the story of creation, God does not annihilate darkness. Rather, God adds light. Darkness is part of human experience. The question to me is, how shall we use the light?

Well, “to see,” of course. But what does that mean?

Years ago, I heard the story of a blind person who was suddenly “sighted” through surgery. That person’s reaction was to say:  “I now know some things that I didn’t know before, but I am not sure why.”

One of my favorite things to do is to take photos of subtle light illuminating familiar things. The light reveals the wondrous beauty of God’s creation.  One of my least favorite things is the harsh illumination of noon sun or “flash.” But this too reveals God’s creation.

The story of the Resurrection is the story of darkness and light, with all of the terrible beauty of both.

—Bren Ortega Murphy, PhD is a faculty member in Communications Studies at Loyola University Chicago. She holds a joint appointment in Loyola’s Women’s Studies program.

Prayer

Life-giving God, source of all light,
lead us to the hope and possibility
of your Easter gifts. Amen.

—the Jesuit prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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April 26, 2017

Jn 3: 16-21

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life. “Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. Those who believe in him are not condemned; but those who do not believe are condemned already, because they have not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

And this is the judgment, that the light has come into the world, and people loved darkness rather than light because their deeds were evil. For all who do evil hate the light and do not come to the light, so that their deeds may not be exposed. But those who do what is true come to the light, so that it may be clearly seen that their deeds have been done in God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Darkness and Light

Images of lightness and darkness are used throughout scripture. Darkness is not always bad. In the story of creation, God does not annihilate darkness. Rather, God adds light. Darkness is part of human experience. The question to me is, how shall we use the light?

Well, “to see,” of course. But what does that mean?

Years ago, I heard the story of a blind person who was suddenly “sighted” through surgery. That person’s reaction was to say:  “I now know some things that I didn’t know before, but I am not sure why.”

One of my favorite things to do is to take photos of subtle light illuminating familiar things. The light reveals the wondrous beauty of God’s creation.  One of my least favorite things is the harsh illumination of noon sun or “flash.” But this too reveals God’s creation.

The story of the Resurrection is the story of darkness and light, with all of the terrible beauty of both.

—Bren Ortega Murphy, PhD is a faculty member in Communications Studies at Loyola University Chicago. She holds a joint appointment in Loyola’s Women’s Studies program.

Prayer

Life-giving God, source of all light,
lead us to the hope and possibility
of your Easter gifts. Amen.

—the Jesuit prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!