February 15, 2018

Lk 9:22-25

“The Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.” Then he said to them all, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it.

What does it profit them if they gain the whole world, but lose or forfeit themselves?

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Disordered Desires

In the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius teaches us about “disordered desires” as those things that we think will bring us happiness, but in the end leave us empty and unfulfilled.  Before his conversion, Ignatius was very concerned about his status in society, how he looked, and seemed to be quite vain.  If he were a student at Prep today, I imagine Ignatius would want to have the newest phone or the best clothes, and I bet that he would pay attention to how many followers he had on twitter.  But when Ignatius was injured and lost all of the things that he thought brought his life meaning, he found that real happiness was found in experiencing God’s unconditional love.  By giving up his old life and following the invitation of Jesus, he found that he in fact saved his life.   

What are my “disordered desires”?  What are the things I do that I think will bring me happiness, but instead leave me unfulfilled?  Can I let go of one of these disordered desires during Lent?  

—Dave Lawler is a Campus Minister at Creighton Prep.  

Prayer

“You have made us for yourself O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they rest in you.”

-St. Augustine


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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February 15, 2018

Lk 9:22-25

“The Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.” Then he said to them all, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it.

What does it profit them if they gain the whole world, but lose or forfeit themselves?

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Disordered Desires

In the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius teaches us about “disordered desires” as those things that we think will bring us happiness, but in the end leave us empty and unfulfilled.  Before his conversion, Ignatius was very concerned about his status in society, how he looked, and seemed to be quite vain.  If he were a student at Prep today, I imagine Ignatius would want to have the newest phone or the best clothes, and I bet that he would pay attention to how many followers he had on twitter.  But when Ignatius was injured and lost all of the things that he thought brought his life meaning, he found that real happiness was found in experiencing God’s unconditional love.  By giving up his old life and following the invitation of Jesus, he found that he in fact saved his life.   

What are my “disordered desires”?  What are the things I do that I think will bring me happiness, but instead leave me unfulfilled?  Can I let go of one of these disordered desires during Lent?  

—Dave Lawler is a Campus Minister at Creighton Prep.  

Prayer

“You have made us for yourself O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they rest in you.”

-St. Augustine


Please share the Good Word with your friends!